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  • Why homeschool?

    I'm a California credentialed teacher. I'm all for homeschooling, if the parents actually DO homeschooling. The kids are better taught, can learn more things, and are better raised in their faith and culture. Homeschooled kids do better (if they aren't left on their own) in college than high school graduates. Since I retired, I have had more fun doing online classes for homeschooled kids (and I'm all for that, too) than I ever did in the public classroom. So the question is....

    What makes a good homeschool family, in your view? Personally, I know that the homeschool teacher...Mom or Dad...had better be willing to spend a LOT of time and energy on this, and not everybody does, or can. So....if you homeschool, why do you?

    And how much time do you spend doing it?
    My opinions are mine, and my opinions are not necessarily the official stands or doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints.If you are not a member, your opinions are even less likely to represent them. Just sayin'.

  • #2
    I travel. A lot. Homeschooled four kids. 1 Army nurse, 1 Congressional nominee to the USNA and Silicon Valley fortune 500 employee, 1 sucessful entrapenuer, 1 NCAA athlete.

    Pulled them from public school. Negative socialization occurring there with 'values free" education. Plus, I would have never seen them with my traveling and their public high school schedules abs rigidity of excuses absences.

    Proud of their mama who sacrificed an executive career to train 4 awesome adults. It's not for everyone, but it worked very well for our family

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Locutus View Post
      I travel. A lot. Homeschooled four kids. 1 Army nurse, 1 Congressional nominee to the USNA and Silicon Valley fortune 500 employee, 1 sucessful entrapenuer, 1 NCAA athlete.

      Pulled them from public school. Negative socialization occurring there with 'values free" education. Plus, I would have never seen them with my traveling and their public high school schedules abs rigidity of excuses absences.

      Proud of their mama who sacrificed an executive career to train 4 awesome adults. It's not for everyone, but it worked very well for our family
      Yeah, it takes sacrifice....and a great deal more interest in one's family and children than in one's personal career ambitions. Kudos to both of you....AND to your kids!!!
      My opinions are mine, and my opinions are not necessarily the official stands or doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints.If you are not a member, your opinions are even less likely to represent them. Just sayin'.

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      • #4
        Yeah as really you have to have patience as well as it is a 24/7 job in being in a home school. But the flip side is as parents, they care more about kids education and know what they are capable of. Just IMHO.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JPPT1974 View Post
          Yeah as really you have to have patience as well as it is a 24/7 job in being in a home school. But the flip side is as parents, they care more about kids education and know what they are capable of. Just IMHO.
          OK, AS a credentialed teacher, I can absolutely concur. I have seen both sides of home schooled kids; the ones whose parents really care about it and who are truly involved.....and the ones who just play at it, leaving their kids nearly illiterate, completely uninformed and requiring all sorts of remedial education to 'catch them up." When homeschooling works, it is absolutely the BEST way to educate kids. When it doesn't....hoo, boy.

          I'm all for homeschooling. Absolutely 100% for it, when the parents take the time to do it right, and I spent a good part of my career helping homeschool parents to understand what the problems are, what their kids MUST know to deal with the world (and with college) and to teach them (the teachers) how to teach their kids. It's been very rewarding. I love it...and I have seen homeschooled kids go on to get advanced degrees and find university EASY, because their early education hadn't let them down. You know...kids who went to museums and concerts and events their public school peers never get to see.

          So count me as a firm supporter.

          IF the parents are as committed to the idea as they need to be, because it's not easy.
          My opinions are mine, and my opinions are not necessarily the official stands or doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints.If you are not a member, your opinions are even less likely to represent them. Just sayin'.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by doama View Post
            I'm a California credentialed teacher. I'm all for homeschooling, if the parents actually DO homeschooling. The kids are better taught, can learn more things, and are better raised in their faith and culture. Homeschooled kids do better (if they aren't left on their own) in college than high school graduates. Since I retired, I have had more fun doing online classes for homeschooled kids (and I'm all for that, too) than I ever did in the public classroom. So the question is....

            What makes a good homeschool family, in your view? Personally, I know that the homeschool teacher...Mom or Dad...had better be willing to spend a LOT of time and energy on this, and not everybody does, or can. So....if you homeschool, why do you?

            And how much time do you spend doing it?
            Yes! My granddaughter is 15 and she scored 1250 on her SAT's and she was home schooled. Public schools spend all their time indoctrinating rather than educating and they wonder why kid do poorly in that environment. To top it off teachers just want tax payers to throw more money at schools. This country built wealth and success teaching children in one room school houses.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by doama View Post
              What makes a good homeschool family, in your view?
              Two parents who support each other. If the parents send mixed messages, the kid will know it.

              Originally posted by doama View Post
              So....if you homeschool, why do you?
              Kids are sponges, if you surround them with dung filled water, they will absorb it. If you surround them with love, they will absorb it.

              Originally posted by doama View Post
              And how much time do you spend doing it?
              I think about 4 hours a day in formal schooling.
              John 17:3 Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by doama View Post
                I'm a California credentialed teacher. I'm all for homeschooling, if the parents actually DO homeschooling. The kids are better taught, can learn more things, and are better raised in their faith and culture. Homeschooled kids do better (if they aren't left on their own) in college than high school graduates. Since I retired, I have had more fun doing online classes for homeschooled kids (and I'm all for that, too) than I ever did in the public classroom. So the question is....

                What makes a good homeschool family, in your view? Personally, I know that the homeschool teacher...Mom or Dad...had better be willing to spend a LOT of time and energy on this, and not everybody does, or can. So....if you homeschool, why do you?

                And how much time do you spend doing it?
                I disagree with home schooling. Our government is promoting and creating a smorgasbord culture for us commoners, so you might as well let your children learn to deal with it in public school at an early age. That way it won’t be so hard on them to adjust in the adult world. Now, if your kids are among the elite who won't have to deal with commoners on a daily basis... have at it.
                Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and difficult things, which thou knowest not. Jeremiah 33:3

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by inquiring mind View Post

                  I disagree with home schooling. Our government is promoting and creating a smorgasbord culture for us commoners, so you might as well let your children learn to deal with it in public school at an early age. That way it won’t be so hard on them to adjust in the adult world. Now, if your kids are among the elite who won't have to deal with commoners on a daily basis... have at it.
                  (remembering...) Y'know, I went to public (OK, in the UK a 'public' school may still mean the opposite of what the US means when it refers to 'public' schools, and other nation's nomenclature may vary) school.

                  It was, please pardon me, hell. When I graduated into the 'real world,' suddenly everybody was more polite, more willing to help, less willing to gossip and back bite...once I graduated I NEVER had my phone number written on the boy's gym, for instance.

                  My daughter was attacked, physically, with a knife in the school I graduated from. She is why I got into homeschooling in the first place. While I was teaching, the students were so trapped in the system...and absolutely had to worry about what color scarf s/he wore in order to avoid getting attacked for associating with the 'wrong gang." There was a list of school rules about what items of clothing could not be worn. We don't do uniforms over this way.

                  Neither I nor my children have ever dealt with the sort of culture, IRL, that we had to deal with in elementary, middle or high school, and I wouldn't subject any child to that. There's no need. I haven't seen that the 'adult world" is anywhere NEAR as nasty or as emotionally traumatic as schools can be.
                  My opinions are mine, and my opinions are not necessarily the official stands or doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints.If you are not a member, your opinions are even less likely to represent them. Just sayin'.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by doama View Post

                    (remembering...) Y'know, I went to public (OK, in the UK a 'public' school may still mean the opposite of what the US means when it refers to 'public' schools, and other nation's nomenclature may vary) school.

                    It was, please pardon me, hell. When I graduated into the 'real world,' suddenly everybody was more polite, more willing to help, less willing to gossip and back bite...once I graduated I NEVER had my phone number written on the boy's gym, for instance.

                    My daughter was attacked, physically, with a knife in the school I graduated from. She is why I got into homeschooling in the first place. While I was teaching, the students were so trapped in the system...and absolutely had to worry about what color scarf s/he wore in order to avoid getting attacked for associating with the 'wrong gang." There was a list of school rules about what items of clothing could not be worn. We don't do uniforms over this way.

                    Neither I nor my children have ever dealt with the sort of culture, IRL, that we had to deal with in elementary, middle or high school, and I wouldn't subject any child to that. There's no need. I haven't seen that the 'adult world" is anywhere NEAR as nasty or as emotionally traumatic as schools can be.
                    I'm sorry about your daughter. If kids can attain the grades, or otherwise afford college, I agree that the resulting adult job atmospheres for them will and does isolate them from most of the liberally created culture we're seeing now in public schools. But, if they're average and can't... hello real world.
                    Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and difficult things, which thou knowest not. Jeremiah 33:3

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by inquiring mind View Post

                      I'm sorry about your daughter. If kids can attain the grades, or otherwise afford college, I agree that the resulting adult job atmospheres for them will and does isolate them from most of the liberally created culture we're seeing now in public schools. But, if they're average and can't... hello real world.
                      If your 'real world' really does look like high school, I'm really, really sorry for you.

                      I have found, though (having lived in both worlds, both the 'blue collar" and the 'college educated white collar'), I can pretty much tell you that the blue collar world is a lot more mature than academia. Or pretty much any other white collar arena....and the 'white collar' arena is nothing like high school.
                      My opinions are mine, and my opinions are not necessarily the official stands or doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints.If you are not a member, your opinions are even less likely to represent them. Just sayin'.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by doama View Post

                        If your 'real world' really does look like high school, I'm really, really sorry for you.

                        I have found, though (having lived in both worlds, both the 'blue collar" and the 'college educated white collar'), I can pretty much tell you that the blue collar world is a lot more mature than academia. Or pretty much any other white collar arena....and the 'white collar' arena is nothing like high school.
                        My school years and career were in Mayberry. I just wish the best for kids today who want to be successful at whatever they do. But, I don't think we should try to isolate them from a society and school system we’ve created though... we should fix it.
                        Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and difficult things, which thou knowest not. Jeremiah 33:3

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by inquiring mind View Post

                          My school years and career were in Mayberry. I just wish the best for kids today who want to be successful at whatever they do. But, I don't think we should try to isolate them from a society and school system we’ve created though... we should fix it.
                          I've heard that before; we should change the system. We should. Absolutely. However, I do not think that throwing MY children at the problem is a good way to fix it. If they want to pay the price themselves and become academics in order to do so, that's fine; up to them. However, MY making them pay that price for my own political views is, in my opinion, not appropriate.

                          As for socialization, there are many, many ways to get kids 'socialized' without sending them to what amounts to a training camp for gangs. They can join clubs. They can take dance, music, art...classes in areas they are interested in with students who share that interest. Get them involved in local charities, like homeless shelters, etc. Take them to museums and parks. Get them involved in your church groups. Join other homeschooling folks who share your vision of how the world should be, where they are the problem solvers, not the problem. If their interest in, say, math goes beyond your ability to teach it, sign them up for a local community college class in it. You know, a class where the teacher can, if there is any disruption, kick the disrupters OUT.

                          So...how does 'the public' ensure that kids actually learn what they need to know? Testing. Yes, I know that's a dirty word, but 'testing' is what is required. You want a high school diploma? Fine. It doesn't matter how you get there...public school, homeschool, a combination of formal and homeschool? No problem. Take the final. Provide the project. Write the paper. Get the diploma.

                          If you do it through the public school system, terrific...try not to get bullied, knifed or kicked out of any of the elitist, racist, whatever clubs on your way, and try really hard to learn what you need to know in classes full of kids who couldn't care less and spend all their time on stuff they think is more important (like the good opinion of the leader of whatever clique or gang can make their lives miserable).

                          If you do it through your parents doing a good job of homeschooling, try not to correct the examiner about his/her opinion of whether Van Gogh primed his canvasses because YOU actually went to the museum and had a good look at one of his sunflower paintings up close. (Hint...he didn't prime his canvasses, at least all the time). This is not an opportunity public school students have, y'know? I can't remember the last time my old high school had a field trip to the Getty museum.

                          but I took my daughter there several times in our own homeschool experience.

                          At the VERY least, parents should 'take over' where the public schools end.
                          My opinions are mine, and my opinions are not necessarily the official stands or doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints.If you are not a member, your opinions are even less likely to represent them. Just sayin'.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by doama View Post

                            I've heard that before; we should change the system. We should. Absolutely. However, I do not think that throwing MY children at the problem is a good way to fix it. If they want to pay the price themselves and become academics in order to do so, that's fine; up to them. However, MY making them pay that price for my own political views is, in my opinion, not appropriate.

                            As for socialization, there are many, many ways to get kids 'socialized' without sending them to what amounts to a training camp for gangs. They can join clubs. They can take dance, music, art...classes in areas they are interested in with students who share that interest. Get them involved in local charities, like homeless shelters, etc. Take them to museums and parks. Get them involved in your church groups. Join other homeschooling folks who share your vision of how the world should be, where they are the problem solvers, not the problem. If their interest in, say, math goes beyond your ability to teach it, sign them up for a local community college class in it. You know, a class where the teacher can, if there is any disruption, kick the disrupters OUT.

                            So...how does 'the public' ensure that kids actually learn what they need to know? Testing. Yes, I know that's a dirty word, but 'testing' is what is required. You want a high school diploma? Fine. It doesn't matter how you get there...public school, homeschool, a combination of formal and homeschool? No problem. Take the final. Provide the project. Write the paper. Get the diploma.

                            If you do it through the public school system, terrific...try not to get bullied, knifed or kicked out of any of the elitist, racist, whatever clubs on your way, and try really hard to learn what you need to know in classes full of kids who couldn't care less and spend all their time on stuff they think is more important (like the good opinion of the leader of whatever clique or gang can make their lives miserable).

                            If you do it through your parents doing a good job of homeschooling, try not to correct the examiner about his/her opinion of whether Van Gogh primed his canvasses because YOU actually went to the museum and had a good look at one of his sunflower paintings up close. (Hint...he didn't prime his canvasses, at least all the time). This is not an opportunity public school students have, y'know? I can't remember the last time my old high school had a field trip to the Getty museum.

                            but I took my daughter there several times in our own homeschool experience.

                            At the VERY least, parents should 'take over' where the public schools end.
                            I’m not arguing, you make some very good points. No one wants to throw their children at the problem, but many of the same people will support a political agenda that creates these type conditions and then bellyache about it… my point.
                            Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and show thee great and difficult things, which thou knowest not. Jeremiah 33:3

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by doama View Post
                              I'm a California credentialed teacher. I'm all for homeschooling, if the parents actually DO homeschooling. The kids are better taught, can learn more things, and are better raised in their faith and culture. Homeschooled kids do better (if they aren't left on their own) in college than high school graduates. Since I retired, I have had more fun doing online classes for homeschooled kids (and I'm all for that, too) than I ever did in the public classroom. So the question is....

                              What makes a good homeschool family, in your view? Personally, I know that the homeschool teacher...Mom or Dad...had better be willing to spend a LOT of time and energy on this, and not everybody does, or can. So....if you homeschool, why do you?

                              And how much time do you spend doing it?
                              Public Education can have some easy fixes like restoring authority to front line teachers to boot problem students. Enforce a code of conduct. Also let students fail. More local control. The DOE can lay off local schools. The problems are not so much with the schools in my area. The problem is mostly from home situations. I get it many parents do not what their child sitting next to some black kid from the hood and single-parent family or sitting next to Forrest Gump in the school classroom. They do not have to keep habitual bullies hanging around and they eventually find ways to remove or isolate habituals in my area. It is getting better since they hired behaviorists to deal and evaluate leaving teachers more time to teach and less time to deal with behavior problems.

                              We just had the super bowl and i am wondering how many of them athletes got their training from public schools, perhaps failing public schools in the hood? Any, for example, from the Chicago public school system? Students can and do learn in public schools and do advance to top professions. I see it all the time. The last doctor at the VA told me she went to my school (K-5) so it did not fail her. Anyone can just about predict these kids will do well in life by the way they conduct themselves in schools.

                              I certainly can understand parents' homeschooling kids if they are being terrorized in the schools and the schools are failing to deal with the bullies. A terrorized kid is not going to learn much. The school needs to be safe. Some are homeschooled and do school activities. This idea that schools are terrible places based largely on ignorance and prejudice. They might view things differently if they spent a couple of years inside with these kids, many of whom will melt your heart.
                              Last edited by lightbeamrider; 02-07-2020, 04:02 PM.
                              Inequality is therefore natural law. Nordau.

                              ''Why is it that when it comes to the age of the earth, people reject the recorded history of the Bible in favor of "scientific" guesswork?

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