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  • Tips for good writing

    Here are some writing tips I have found on the internet.

    1. Always avoid alliteration.

    2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

    3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They’re old hat.)

    4. Employ the vernacular

    5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.

    6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.

    7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

    8. Contractions aren’t necessary.

    9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.

    10. One should never generalize.

    11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Emerson said, “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”

    12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

    13. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; it’s highly superfluous.

    14. Be more or less specific.

    15. Understatement is always best.

    16. One word sentences? Eliminate.

    17. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

    18. The passive voice is to be avoided.

    19. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.

    20. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

    21. Who needs rhetorical questions?

    22. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

    23. Superlatives are the worst.

    24. Brevity is the soul of wit; that is to say, in order to best maximize one’s rhetorical effect, it is necessary to strip down any given idea to its bare essentials, and to use as few words as necessary to convey the sentiment, generally speaking.

    25. You shouldn’t never, ever use double negatives.
    God wants full custody of is children, not just visits on Sunday.

  • #2
    Always avoid alliteration?
    Why?

    Comment


    • #3
      Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.
      I had to look up what ampersands are!

      Now I know!

      >>>> &&&&

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by theophilus View Post
        Here are some writing tips I have found on the internet.

        1. Always avoid alliteration.

        2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

        3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They’re old hat.)

        4. Employ the vernacular

        5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.

        6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.

        7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

        8. Contractions aren’t necessary.

        9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.

        10. One should never generalize.

        11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Emerson said, “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”

        12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

        13. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; it’s highly superfluous.

        14. Be more or less specific.

        15. Understatement is always best.

        16. One word sentences? Eliminate.

        17. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

        18. The passive voice is to be avoided.

        19. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.

        20. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

        21. Who needs rhetorical questions?

        22. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

        23. Superlatives are the worst.

        24. Brevity is the soul of wit; that is to say, in order to best maximize one’s rhetorical effect, it is necessary to strip down any given idea to its bare essentials, and to use as few words as necessary to convey the sentiment, generally speaking.

        25. You shouldn’t never, ever use double negatives.
        Hahaha Very funny, for a moment I thought "God wants full custody of is children, not just visits on Sunday." was number 26. Going to church is visiting the mother after all.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Silvan View Post
          Always avoid alliteration?
          Why?
          Why not???
          God wants full custody of is children, not just visits on Sunday.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Silvan View Post
            Always avoid alliteration?
            Why?
            Read closer, each line mocks itself.
            1Corinthians 1:30-31
            30
            And because of him you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, righteousness and sanctification and redemption, 31 so that, as it is written, “Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord.”

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by theophilus View Post
              Here are some writing tips I have found on the internet.

              1. Always avoid alliteration.

              2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

              3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They’re old hat.)

              4. Employ the vernacular

              5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.

              6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.

              7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

              8. Contractions aren’t necessary.

              9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.

              10. One should never generalize.

              11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Emerson said, “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”

              12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

              13. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; it’s highly superfluous.

              14. Be more or less specific.

              15. Understatement is always best.

              16. One word sentences? Eliminate.

              17. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

              18. The passive voice is to be avoided.

              19. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.

              20. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

              21. Who needs rhetorical questions?

              22. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

              23. Superlatives are the worst.

              24. Brevity is the soul of wit; that is to say, in order to best maximize one’s rhetorical effect, it is necessary to strip down any given idea to its bare essentials, and to use as few words as necessary to convey the sentiment, generally speaking.

              25. You shouldn’t never, ever use double negatives.
              In other words, everything that you have stated is what you have done.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am not sure, but repitition of vowels may not be alliteration. I thought that was the repitition of letters that are not vowels.
                "It is easy to fool a man, but almost impossible to get him to admit he was fooled." (attributed to Mark Twain)

                "If the truth hurts--it's working." (Anonymous)

                "Let the wife make her husband glad to come home and let him make her sorry to see him leave." (Martin Luther)

                "A layman who has the Scripture is more than Pope or council without it."
                (Martin Luther)

                "A Mormon acquaintance once pushed Mark Twain into an argument on the issue of polygamy. After a long and tedious exposition justifying the practice, the Mormon demanded that Twain cite any passage of scripture expressly forbidding the practice of plural marriage. 'Nothing easier,' Twain replied, 'No man can serve two masters.'"
                (source unknown)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
                  I am not sure, but repitition of vowels may not be alliteration. I thought that was the repitition of letters that are not vowels.
                  Yes I remember learning it like that also. I think one could differentiate between consonance, and assonance.

                  Nice Luther Rose btw.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bonnie View Post
                    I am not sure, but repitition of vowels may not be alliteration. I thought that was the repitition of letters that are not vowels.
                    I believe alliteration is the use of words that all start with the same letter, regardless of whether it is a vowel or a consonant. Anyway "always avoid alliteration" sounds like alliteration, whether it really is or not.
                    God wants full custody of is children, not just visits on Sunday.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by theophilus View Post
                      Here are some writing tips I have found on the internet.

                      1. Always avoid alliteration.

                      2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

                      3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They’re old hat.)

                      4. Employ the vernacular

                      5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.

                      6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.

                      7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

                      8. Contractions aren’t necessary.

                      9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.

                      10. One should never generalize.

                      11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Emerson said, “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”

                      12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

                      13. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; it’s highly superfluous.

                      14. Be more or less specific.

                      15. Understatement is always best.

                      16. One word sentences? Eliminate.

                      17. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

                      18. The passive voice is to be avoided.

                      19. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.

                      20. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

                      21. Who needs rhetorical questions?

                      22. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

                      23. Superlatives are the worst.

                      24. Brevity is the soul of wit; that is to say, in order to best maximize one’s rhetorical effect, it is necessary to strip down any given idea to its bare essentials, and to use as few words as necessary to convey the sentiment, generally speaking.

                      25. You shouldn’t never, ever use double negatives.
                      Nice summary. Be consistent -

                      Last edited by inertia; 02-21-2020, 05:12 AM.
                      " But I, the LORD, make the following promise: I have made a covenant governing the coming of day and night. I have established the fixed laws governing heaven and earth. " ( Jeremiah 33:25, NET)
                      ..........

                      - The exact sciences also start from the assumption that in the end, it will always be possible to understand nature, even in every new field of experience, but that we may make no a priori assumptions about the meaning of the word "understand." - Heisenberg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by inertia View Post

                        Nice summary. Be consistent -

                        I like your seventh point.
                        God wants full custody of is children, not just visits on Sunday.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by theophilus View Post

                          I like your seventh point.
                          Seven of Nine agrees.
                          " But I, the LORD, make the following promise: I have made a covenant governing the coming of day and night. I have established the fixed laws governing heaven and earth. " ( Jeremiah 33:25, NET)
                          ..........

                          - The exact sciences also start from the assumption that in the end, it will always be possible to understand nature, even in every new field of experience, but that we may make no a priori assumptions about the meaning of the word "understand." - Heisenberg

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by theophilus View Post
                            Here are some writing tips I have found on the internet.

                            1. Always avoid alliteration.

                            2. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.

                            3. Avoid cliches like the plague. (They’re old hat.)

                            4. Employ the vernacular

                            5. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc.

                            6. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary.

                            7. It is wrong to ever split an infinitive.

                            8. Contractions aren’t necessary.

                            9. Foreign words and phrases are not apropos.

                            10. One should never generalize.

                            11. Eliminate quotations. As Ralph Emerson said, “I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.”

                            12. Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

                            13. Don’t be redundant; don’t use more words than necessary; it’s highly superfluous.

                            14. Be more or less specific.

                            15. Understatement is always best.

                            16. One word sentences? Eliminate.

                            17. Analogies in writing are like feathers on a snake.

                            18. The passive voice is to be avoided.

                            19. Go around the barn at high noon to avoid colloquialisms.

                            20. Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

                            21. Who needs rhetorical questions?

                            22. Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

                            23. Superlatives are the worst.

                            24. Brevity is the soul of wit; that is to say, in order to best maximize one’s rhetorical effect, it is necessary to strip down any given idea to its bare essentials, and to use as few words as necessary to convey the sentiment, generally speaking.

                            25. You shouldn’t never, ever use double negatives.
                            The best approach is to forget the list and write the truth as clearly and simply as possible.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by e v e View Post
                              The best approach is to forget the list and write the truth as clearly and simply as possible.
                              This is of course easier said than done because clarity and simplicity are often mutually exclusive and the truth, more often than not, monstrously subjective.

                              Comment

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