💡 Orbital Resonance

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Exoplanet studies theorize that Hot Jupiters migrated closer to their Star over Time. It is believed that our Jupiter began to do this, but Saturn attracted it back to the outer regions of the Solar System. Is this an example of Orbital Resonance acting to Fine Tune the System?

I'm interested in finding out if Orbital Resonance can be a trait of the Rare Earth Hypothesis. Some questions I have are things like "Does a Solar System around another Yellow Dwarf Star require eight comparable Planets like ours, in order to have an Earth Analog resonating in the middle of their Liquid Water Habitable Zone?"

Is Orbital Resonance already applied to the Rare Earth Hypothesis? Should it be added to it?

If Mercury didn't exist, would this disrupt and adjust our place in the Liquid Water Habitable Zone? Can we calculate the effect of our Orbital Resonance if Mercury at one time used to be a Hot Neptune; as some speculate it is the core of a Gas Giant Planet?


@inertia I am the former bruisermiller...
 
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inertia

Super Member
Exoplanet studies theorize that Hot Jupiters migrated closer to their Star over Time. It is believed that our Jupiter began to do this, but Saturn attracted it back to the outer regions of the Solar System. Is this an example of Orbital Resonance acting to Fine Tune the System?

I'm interested in finding out if Orbital Resonance can be a trait of the Rare Earth Hypothesis. Some questions I have are things like "Does a Solar System around another Yellow Dwarf Star require eight comparable Planets like ours, in order to have an Earth Analog resonating in the middle of their Liquid Water Habitable Zone?"

Is Orbital Resonance already applied to the Rare Earth Hypothesis? Should it be added to it?

If Mercury didn't exist, would this disrupt and adjust our place in the Liquid Water Habitable Zone? Can we calculate the effect of our Orbital Resonance if Mercury at one time used to be a Hot Neptune; as some speculate it is the core of a Gas Giant Planet?


@inertia I am the former bruisermiller...

Hi, Bruisermiller ( ReverendRV ). It has been a while since our last discussion. :cool:

Because it takes an immense number of well-timed physical events that must be sustained for enough time within a set of overlapping habitable zones, it seems reasonable to extrapolate the concept of the Rare Earth Hypothesis with the physics of orbital resonances. You might be interested in results found in the Grand Track Model of our solar system.
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Hi, Bruisermiller ( ReverendRV ). It has been a while since our last discussion. :cool:

Because it takes an immense number of well-timed physical events that must be sustained for enough time within a set of overlapping habitable zones, it seems reasonable to extrapolate the concept of the Rare Earth Hypothesis with the physics of orbital resonances. You might be interested in results found in the Grand Track Model of our solar system.
As usual, you're a fountain of information. Part of me wants to look at Orbital Resonance as a Great Filter for the existence of Life; here and elsewhere. I think there are just too many Scientific reasons to not believe we are all there is. Orbital Resonance is the reason we're smack-dab in the middle of the Liquid Water Habitable Zone at the right time of the Sun's lifecycle...

More Goldilocks stuff...
 
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inertia

Super Member
Have I asked you about the Ultraviolet Habitable Zone yet?

I remember reading about it although I don't recall the original source.

Even within a number of habitable zones, a gamma-ray burst within the Milky Way that is directed toward Earth could eviscerate our ozone layer and thereby allow a broad range of UV radiation to reach Earth's surface and kill many species. - This may have been a factor during the Ordovician mass extinction.
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
I remember reading about it although I don't recall the original source.

Even within a number of habitable zones, a gamma-ray burst within the Milky Way that is directed toward Earth could eviscerate our ozone layer and thereby allow a broad range of UV radiation to reach Earth's surface and kill many species. - This may have been a factor during the Ordovician mass extinction.
Yes. The reason I looked into the Ultraviolet Habitable Zone is because I heard Hugh Ross talk about it; we're also in that Habitable Zone. So I looked it up and found Japanese Scientists who teach it; though the teaching is not prevalent yet because it's newish...

 

inertia

Super Member
Yes. The reason I looked into the Ultraviolet Habitable Zone is because I heard Hugh Ross talk about it; we're also in that Habitable Zone. So I looked it up and found Japanese Scientists who teach it; though the teaching is not prevalent yet because it's newish...


Thanks -

The authors linked also briefly discuss the potential existence of life on exomoons without atmospheres.

" It could be possible on Europa, which seems to have liquid water under the surface because of tidal heating by Jupiter (e.g., McCollom 1999, Schulze-Makuch & Irwin 2001, Marion et al. 2003). As another example, on Ceres, water under the surface is also expected because water vapor ejects from there (Küppers et al. 2014). If similar condition are possible on exo-moons in extrasolar systems, life may exist under their surfaces. However, in case of lack of atmosphere, life is not protected from harmful radiation. And then, primitive life is not able to prosper and do not evolve to evolved life."

Sending a robot to Europa with an extra-long drill and drone submarines would be a fascinating exploration mission.

..
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Thanks -

The authors linked also briefly discuss the potential existence of life on exomoons without atmospheres.

" It could be possible on Europa, which seems to have liquid water under the surface because of tidal heating by Jupiter (e.g., McCollom 1999, Schulze-Makuch & Irwin 2001, Marion et al. 2003). As another example, on Ceres, water under the surface is also expected because water vapor ejects from there (Küppers et al. 2014). If similar condition are possible on exo-moons in extrasolar systems, life may exist under their surfaces. However, in case of lack of atmosphere, life is not protected from harmful radiation. And then, primitive life is not able to prosper and do not evolve to evolved life."

Sending a robot to Europa with an extra-long drill and drone submarines would be a fascinating exploration mission.

..
I would be Willing to lay odds that no Life will be found. But if it were, would you attribute it to Abiogenesis or to Panspermia? I don't think either are viable except possibly on an Earth Analog...
 

inertia

Super Member
I would be Willing to lay odds that no Life will be found. But if it were, would you attribute it to Abiogenesis or to Panspermia? I don't think either are viable except possibly on an Earth Analog...

Oh, I don't believe that we will find life there either, especially sentient, intelligent, technologically advanced life. If God wanted life there we might find it. A fungus perhaps?

.......
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Oh, I don't believe that we will find life there either, especially sentient, intelligent, technologically advanced life. If God wanted life there we might find it. A fungus perhaps?

.......
Abiogenesis and Genesis. Biblically speaking, if Life is elsewhere out of the reach of Panspermia, it should be due to Genesis...

I think...
 
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