1 John regeneration precedes faith !

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guest1

Guest
Several texts from 1 John demonstrate that regeneration precedes faith. The texts are as follows:

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts. First, in every instance the verb “born” (gennaô) is in the perfect tense, denoting an action that precedes the human actions of practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, loving, or believing.

Second, no evangelical would say that before we are born again we must practice righteousness, for such a view would teach works-righteousness. Nor would we say that first we avoid sinning, and then are born of God, for such a view would suggest that human works cause us to be born of God. Nor would we say that first we show great love for God, and then he causes us to be born again. No, it is clear that practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, and loving are all the consequences or results of the new birth. But if this is the case, then we must interpret 1 John 5:1 in the same way, for the structure of the verse is the same as we find in the texts about practicing righteousness (1 John 2:29), avoiding sin (1 John 3:9), and loving God (1 John 4:7). It follows, then, that 1 John 5:1 teaches that first God grants us new life and then we believe Jesus is the Christ.

We see the same truth in Acts 16:14. First God opens Lydia’s heart and the consequence is that she pays heed to and believes in the message proclaimed by Paul. Similarly, no one can come to Jesus in faith unless God has worked in his heart to draw him to faith in Christ (John 6:44). But all those whom the Father has drawn or given to the Son will most certainly put their faith in Jesus (John 6:37).

God regenerates us and then we believe, and hence regeneration precedes our conversion. Therefore, we give all the glory to God for our conversion, for our turning to him is entirely a work of his grace. T.Schreiner

hope this helps !!!
 
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brightfame52

Well-known member
Several texts from 1 John demonstrate that regeneration precedes faith. The texts are as follows:

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts. First, in every instance the verb “born” (gennaô) is in the perfect tense, denoting an action that precedes the human actions of practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, loving, or believing.

Second, no evangelical would say that before we are born again we must practice righteousness, for such a view would teach works-righteousness. Nor would we say that first we avoid sinning, and then are born of God, for such a view would suggest that human works cause us to be born of God. Nor would we say that first we show great love for God, and then he causes us to be born again. No, it is clear that practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, and loving are all the consequences or results of the new birth. But if this is the case, then we must interpret 1 John 5:1 in the same way, for the structure of the verse is the same as we find in the texts about practicing righteousness (1 John 2:29), avoiding sin (1 John 3:9), and loving God (1 John 4:7). It follows, then, that 1 John 5:1 teaches that first God grants us new life and then we believe Jesus is the Christ.

We see the same truth in Acts 16:14. First God opens Lydia’s heart and the consequence is that she pays heed to and believes in the message proclaimed by Paul. Similarly, no one can come to Jesus in faith unless God has worked in his heart to draw him to faith in Christ (John 6:44). But all those whom the Father has drawn or given to the Son will most certainly put their faith in Jesus (John 6:37).

God regenerates us and then we believe, and hence regeneration precedes our conversion. Therefore, we give all the glory to God for our conversion, for our turning to him is entirely a work of his grace. schreiner

hope this helps !!!
Very well stated
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Several texts from 1 John demonstrate that regeneration precedes faith. The texts are as follows:

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts. First, in every instance the verb “born” (gennaô) is in the perfect tense, denoting an action that precedes the human actions of practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, loving, or believing.

Second, no evangelical would say that before we are born again we must practice righteousness, for such a view would teach works-righteousness. Nor would we say that first we avoid sinning, and then are born of God, for such a view would suggest that human works cause us to be born of God. Nor would we say that first we show great love for God, and then he causes us to be born again. No, it is clear that practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, and loving are all the consequences or results of the new birth. But if this is the case, then we must interpret 1 John 5:1 in the same way, for the structure of the verse is the same as we find in the texts about practicing righteousness (1 John 2:29), avoiding sin (1 John 3:9), and loving God (1 John 4:7). It follows, then, that 1 John 5:1 teaches that first God grants us new life and then we believe Jesus is the Christ.

We see the same truth in Acts 16:14. First God opens Lydia’s heart and the consequence is that she pays heed to and believes in the message proclaimed by Paul. Similarly, no one can come to Jesus in faith unless God has worked in his heart to draw him to faith in Christ (John 6:44). But all those whom the Father has drawn or given to the Son will most certainly put their faith in Jesus (John 6:37).

God regenerates us and then we believe, and hence regeneration precedes our conversion. Therefore, we give all the glory to God for our conversion, for our turning to him is entirely a work of his grace. T.Schreiner

hope this helps !!!
Every Christian has Pretexts, but not all Christians have Compatibalism and a Temporal Order where Pretexts flow Concurrently...
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
Several texts from 1 John demonstrate that regeneration precedes faith. The texts are as follows:

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts....
Here's my observation; John is speaking to faithful saints who have already believed. It's not about John telling how they were first regenerated in order to believe.
 

zerinus

Well-known member
Several texts from 1 John demonstrate that regeneration precedes faith. The texts are as follows:

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts. First, in every instance the verb “born” (gennaô) is in the perfect tense, denoting an action that precedes the human actions of practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, loving, or believing.

Second, no evangelical would say that before we are born again we must practice righteousness, for such a view would teach works-righteousness. Nor would we say that first we avoid sinning, and then are born of God, for such a view would suggest that human works cause us to be born of God. Nor would we say that first we show great love for God, and then he causes us to be born again. No, it is clear that practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, and loving are all the consequences or results of the new birth. But if this is the case, then we must interpret 1 John 5:1 in the same way, for the structure of the verse is the same as we find in the texts about practicing righteousness (1 John 2:29), avoiding sin (1 John 3:9), and loving God (1 John 4:7). It follows, then, that 1 John 5:1 teaches that first God grants us new life and then we believe Jesus is the Christ.

We see the same truth in Acts 16:14. First God opens Lydia’s heart and the consequence is that she pays heed to and believes in the message proclaimed by Paul. Similarly, no one can come to Jesus in faith unless God has worked in his heart to draw him to faith in Christ (John 6:44). But all those whom the Father has drawn or given to the Son will most certainly put their faith in Jesus (John 6:37).

God regenerates us and then we believe, and hence regeneration precedes our conversion. Therefore, we give all the glory to God for our conversion, for our turning to him is entirely a work of his grace. T.Schreiner

hope this helps !!!
How do you explain Cornelius, who was found righteous without being “born of God”:

Acts 10:

34 Then Peter opened his mouth, and said, Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons:
35 But in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.
 
G

guest1

Guest
How do you explain Cornelius, who was found righteous without being “born of God”:

Acts 10:

34 Then Peter opened his mouth, and said, Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons:
35 But in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.
I’ll comment on the scriptures in the OP, thanks !
 

zerinus

Well-known member
I do hence the OP.

Not interested in your diversion and avoidance of the texts in the OP.
No avoidance. Christian theology is built on scripture as a whole, not just on the bits you like, to the exclusion of the bits you don’t. If one scripture appears to be saying one thing, and another scripture appears to be saying something different, the most likely explanation is that your interpretation of one or both scriptures is wrong. You don’t just build your theology on the bits you like, and exclude the bits you don’t.
 
G

guest1

Guest
No avoidance. Christian theology is built on scripture as a whole, not just on the bits you like, to the exclusion of the bits you don’t. If one scripture appears to be saying one thing, and another scripture appears to be saying something different, the most likely explanation is that your interpretation of one or both scriptures is wrong. You don’t just build your theology on the bits you like, and exclude the bits you don’t.
If you are capable of sticking to the texts in the OP I’m all in otherwise I’m not.
 

brightfame52

Well-known member
...but these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God,
and that believing
you may have life in His name.

...but these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God,
and that having life
you may believe in His name.
And so whats your point in posting these scriptures ?
 
G

guest1

Guest
...but these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God,
and that believing
you may have life in His name.

...but these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God,
and that having life
you may believe in His name.
Great verses but the OP was discussing 1 John not the gospel of John . Thanks !
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
Here's my observation; John is speaking to faithful saints who have already believed. It's not about John telling how they were first regenerated in order to believe.
The grammar says otherwise
The context says otherwise.
No it doesn’t hence the grammar
Nice try its called the OP and dealing with the context( 1 John).
I dealt with the context (1John); you wanted grammar.
 
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