1 John regeneration precedes faith !

Daniel.

Member
Several texts from 1 John demonstrate that regeneration precedes faith. The texts are as follows:

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts. First, in every instance the verb “born” (gennaô) is in the perfect tense, denoting an action that precedes the human actions of practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, loving, or believing.

Second, no evangelical would say that before we are born again we must practice righteousness, for such a view would teach works-righteousness. Nor would we say that first we avoid sinning, and then are born of God, for such a view would suggest that human works cause us to be born of God. Nor would we say that first we show great love for God, and then he causes us to be born again. No, it is clear that practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, and loving are all the consequences or results of the new birth. But if this is the case, then we must interpret 1 John 5:1 in the same way, for the structure of the verse is the same as we find in the texts about practicing righteousness (1 John 2:29), avoiding sin (1 John 3:9), and loving God (1 John 4:7). It follows, then, that 1 John 5:1 teaches that first God grants us new life and then we believe Jesus is the Christ.

We see the same truth in Acts 16:14. First God opens Lydia’s heart and the consequence is that she pays heed to and believes in the message proclaimed by Paul. Similarly, no one can come to Jesus in faith unless God has worked in his heart to draw him to faith in Christ (John 6:44). But all those whom the Father has drawn or given to the Son will most certainly put their faith in Jesus (John 6:37).

God regenerates us and then we believe, and hence regeneration precedes our conversion. Therefore, we give all the glory to God for our conversion, for our turning to him is entirely a work of his grace. T.Schreiner

hope this helps !!!
This is just another in a series of "tests"--the epistle is littered with them--believers are to perform on purported Christians.

1 John 4
1Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God

Spirits are inside of people--they are not to be believed but tested.

Yes, when I test someone to see if they're really "in the faith", one of the tests, among many, I am to perform is to assay whether they believe Jesus is the Christ (with all the full meaning of those words--eg, "Christ" cannot mean "space alien", etc).
 

Daniel.

Member
Two issues here.

1. You've left out the Gospel. Which is very important. Is it your requirement that a person hear the Gospel before they're regenerated?

2. God opened Lydia's heart to help Paul. It had nothing to do with regeneration. Read the context of your reference.

Act 16:14 One who heard us was a woman named Lydia, from the city of Thyatira, a seller of purple goods, who was a worshiper of God. The Lord opened her heart to pay attention to what was said by Paul.
Act 16:15 And after she was baptized, and her household as well, she urged us, saying, “If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come to my house and stay.” And she prevailed upon us.
Calvinism teaches that people are born of God first and only afterward can believe--and this, they claim, interlockingly conforms with and reinforces Calvinism's "Soli Deo Gloria" (Glory To God Alone) structure.

Of course, this schema of justification is Edit per mod
 
Last edited by a moderator:
G

guest1

Guest
This is just another in a series of "tests"--the epistle is littered with them--believers are to perform on purported Christians.

1 John 4
1Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God

Spirits are inside of people--they are not to be believed but tested.

Yes, when I test someone to see if they're really "in the faith", one of the tests, among many, I am to perform is to assay whether they believe Jesus is the Christ (with all the full meaning of those words--eg, "Christ" cannot mean "space alien", etc).
diversion.

From the OP below :

“If you know that he is righteous, you may be sure that everyone who practices righteousness has been born of him” (1 John 2:29).
“No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God’s seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God” (1 John 3:9).
“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4:7).
“Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the Father loves whomever has been born of him” (1 John 5:1).

We can make two observations from these texts. First, in every instance the verb “born” (gennaô) is in the perfect tense, denoting an action that precedes the human actions of practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, loving, or believing.

Second, no evangelical would say that before we are born again we must practice righteousness, for such a view would teach works-righteousness. Nor would we say that first we avoid sinning, and then are born of God, for such a view would suggest that human works cause us to be born of God. Nor would we say that first we show great love for God, and then he causes us to be born again.

No, it is clear that practicing righteousness, avoiding sin, and loving are all the consequences or results of the new birth. But if this is the case, then we must interpret 1 John 5:1 in the same way, for the structure of the verse is the same as we find in the texts about practicing righteousness (1 John 2:29), avoiding sin (1 John 3:9), and loving God (1 John 4:7). It follows, then, that 1 John 5:1 teaches that first God grants us new life and then we believe Jesus is the Christ.
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
This is just another in a series of "tests"--the epistle is littered with them--believers are to perform on purported Christians.

1 John 4
1Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God

Spirits are inside of people--they are not to be believed but tested.

"Do not believe" is in the imperative mood (ie. "command").
It is "prescriptive".

1John 5:1, "everyone who believes" is a continuous participle, and is "descxriptive". It is not a command, like 1 John 4:1 is. So you are in error to describe it as something "one must perform", because the text simply doesn't say that.

Yes, when I test someone to see if they're really "in the faith", one of the tests, among many, I am to perform is to assay whether they believe Jesus is the Christ (with all the full meaning of those words--eg, "Christ" cannot mean "space alien", etc).

Where does the Bible teach that you have authority or responsibility to "test someone [else] to see if they're really 'in the faith' "?
 
Top