2 Corinthians 5:21 - become the righteousness of God

JoeT

Well-known member
For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.
2 Corinthians 5:21

Catholics, how does one BECOME the righteousness OF GOD?
“Justice is uprightness rectitude-of-will kept for its own sake.” [St. Anselm, On Truth, 12], i.e. being right with God, righteousness. Continuing Anselm said, “Justice is not rightness of knowledge or rightness of action but is rightness of will.” [St. Anselm, On Truth, 12].

JoeT
 

JoeT

Well-known member
This doesn't answer the question.
We are justified in Baptism where we begin a process of perfection to a state of being right-with-God, [Cf. Matthew 5:48]. Likewise sanctification and righteousness. Consequently, one can rightly interchange justification, sanctification and righteousness where we read the word Greek word "dikaioō". Being justified is the state of righteousness, and one is not righteous unless sanctified. In the protest bible the word dikaioō is more often translated as "righteous" to avoid viewing justice as a virtue in progress.

JoeT
 

Our Lord's God

Well-known member
We are justified in Baptism where we begin a process of perfection to a state of being right-with-God, [Cf. Matthew 5:48]. Likewise sanctification and righteousness. Consequently, one can rightly interchange justification, sanctification and righteousness where we read the word Greek word "dikaioō"

Like you can call apples "oranges" whenever you see the word "apples" and just because you feel like it?

It would have been wiser for you to argue that justification and sanctification are two sides of the same coin rather than absurdly claim you can use one label or the other as if they are the same thing when they are obviously not.

and righteousness where we read the word Greek word "dikaioō". Being justified is the state of righteousness, and one is not righteous unless sanctified. In the protest bible the word dikaioō is more often translated as "righteous" to avoid viewing justice as a virtue in progress.

JoeT

Paul is referring to the righteousness OF GOD.

You still have not answered the question. Referring to baptism doesn't answer the question. How does one become the righteousness OF GOD? What must we BECOME to be the righteousness OF GOD?
 

Nondenom40

Well-known member
“Justice is uprightness rectitude-of-will kept for its own sake.” [St. Anselm, On Truth, 12], i.e. being right with God, righteousness. Continuing Anselm said, “Justice is not rightness of knowledge or rightness of action but is rightness of will.” [St. Anselm, On Truth, 12].

JoeT
So its the righteousness of your will?
 

Nondenom40

Well-known member
We are justified in Baptism where we begin a process of perfection to a state of being right-with-God, [Cf. Matthew 5:48]. Likewise sanctification and righteousness. Consequently, one can rightly interchange justification, sanctification and righteousness where we read the word Greek word "dikaioō". Being justified is the state of righteousness, and one is not righteous unless sanctified. In the protest bible the word dikaioō is more often translated as "righteous" to avoid viewing justice as a virtue in progress.

JoeT
We've been here before. Heres my verse;

Rom 5:1 Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Where is your verse that we are justified by baptism?
 

balshan

Well-known member
“Justice is uprightness rectitude-of-will kept for its own sake.” [St. Anselm, On Truth, 12], i.e. being right with God, righteousness. Continuing Anselm said, “Justice is not rightness of knowledge or rightness of action but is rightness of will.” [St. Anselm, On Truth, 12].

JoeT
More RC verbiage which actually says nothing at all and clearly does not answer the question. By the way is that how RCs justify sin, my will didn't want to sin, so everything is fine. Don't look over here.
 

balshan

Well-known member
We are justified in Baptism where we begin a process of perfection to a state of being right-with-God, [Cf. Matthew 5:48]. Likewise sanctification and righteousness. Consequently, one can rightly interchange justification, sanctification and righteousness where we read the word Greek word "dikaioō". Being justified is the state of righteousness, and one is not righteous unless sanctified. In the protest bible the word dikaioō is more often translated as "righteous" to avoid viewing justice as a virtue in progress.

JoeT
Water justifies no one. The Jewish people regularly had mitveh for cleansing.
 

JoeT

Well-known member
Water justifies no one. The Jewish people regularly had mitveh for cleansing.
No one that enters heaven is unclean. Christ commands Baptism as the Sacrament of cleansing, justification [Cf. John 3:5]. The sacrament itself is the outward sign of an inward grace, being made right with God (righteousness). It is not coincidental that you should bring up Mitveh, the cleansing was used for converts to enter the kingdom of Israel. Likewise Baptism is the doorway to enter of God's Kingdom, the Catholic Church.

JoeT
 

balshan

Well-known member
No one that enters heaven is unclean. Christ commands Baptism as the Sacrament of cleansing, justification [Cf. John 3:5]. The sacrament itself is the outward sign of an inward grace, being made right with God (righteousness). It is not coincidental that you should bring up Mitveh, the cleansing was used for converts to enter the kingdom of Israel. Likewise Baptism is the doorway to enter of God's Kingdom, the Catholic Church.

JoeT
Oh showing a little knowledge of mikveh but not complete knowledge. Baptism is not the doorway to enter God's kingdom that is a false claim. Jesus is the door according to scripture. No Jesus doesn't command baptism as a sacrament of cleansing, justification. Yep no understanding of that verse at all by you.
 

JoeT

Well-known member
Oh showing a little knowledge of mikveh but not complete knowledge. Baptism is not the doorway to enter God's kingdom that is a false claim. Jesus is the door according to scripture. No Jesus doesn't command baptism as a sacrament of cleansing, justification. Yep no understanding of that verse at all by you.
Why, yes Jesus is the doorway to enter the Body of Christ. the Catholic Church, not the body of deformation.

JoeT
 

balshan

Well-known member
Why, yes Jesus is the doorway to enter the Body of Christ. the Catholic Church, not the body of deformation.

JoeT
Your institution is deformed by sin, it leads you nowhere, it follows the Roman Emperors as shown by its fruit. So not it has nothing to do with leading a person to Jesus and has nothing to do with Jesus.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Like you can call apples "oranges" whenever you see the word "apples" and just because you feel like it?

It would have been wiser for you to argue that justification and sanctification are two sides of the same coin rather than absurdly claim you can use one label or the other as if they are the same thing when they are obviously not.



Paul is referring to the righteousness OF GOD.

You still have not answered the question. Referring to baptism doesn't answer the question. How does one become the righteousness OF GOD? What must we BECOME to be the righteousness OF GOD?
Easy--have faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and God and Savior, and trust in Him only for salvation, great and free.
 

JoeT

Well-known member
Jesus is the doorway to the true church and salvation. Yours stopped being the true church centuries ago, when it started teaching false doctrines.

Can you put a date and time to that is universally agreed to by the minions of the deformation? Catholics are still here as He promised, not even the gates of Hell and protest-ism will prevail.

JoeT
 
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