A New Space Observatory

inertia

Super Member
Even while working through a gauntlet of imposing and exceedingly costly technical problems for many years including the recent COVID-19 slowdown, Northrop Grumman's tests are now coming to an end prior to transferring the telescope to Europe's spaceport near the city of Kourou, in French Guiana.

Lockheed C-5B Galaxy.JPG

It's time for the next stage of exploration.

"When Webb is in space, commands will flow from STScI to one of the three Deep Space Network locations: Goldstone, California; Madrid, Spain; or Canberra, Australia. Signals will then be sent to the orbiting observatory nearly one million miles away. Additionally, NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite network – the Space Network in New Mexico, the European Space Agency’s Malindi station in Kenya, and European Space Operations Centre in Germany – will help keep a constant line of communication open with Webb. "

..................
References and credits:
- How to ship an $8.8 billion telescope
- Completion of functional testing
 

SteveB

Well-known member
Even while working through a gauntlet of imposing and exceedingly costly technical problems for many years including the recent COVID-19 slowdown, Northrop Grumman's tests are now coming to an end prior to transferring the telescope to Europe's spaceport near the city of Kourou, in French Guiana.

View attachment 997

It's time for the next stage of exploration.

"When Webb is in space, commands will flow from STScI to one of the three Deep Space Network locations: Goldstone, California; Madrid, Spain; or Canberra, Australia. Signals will then be sent to the orbiting observatory nearly one million miles away. Additionally, NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite network – the Space Network in New Mexico, the European Space Agency’s Malindi station in Kenya, and European Space Operations Centre in Germany – will help keep a constant line of communication open with Webb. "

..................
References and credits:
- How to ship an $8.8 billion telescope
- Completion of functional testing
pretty cool!
I've been waiting for this since I first heard about it in either 1999 or 2000.
Back then it was going to have every conceivable gadget, and be a 10 meter device.... Last I'd heard it's now down to 6-8 meters, and the gadgets have been reduced by half.


Apparently, it's a 6.5 meter "dish" now.....
Sad.
I recall how excited we all were when they said 10 meters and every conceivable gadget..... Admittedly, since tech has advanced so much since then, the tech that will be included will probably be far more advanced than the initial scheduled launch date.

https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/

Well...... grab a cup of cocoa, a nice warm blanket, and a seat to see what happens.
I'm know I'm ecstatic about it.
 

inertia

Super Member
pretty cool!
I've been waiting for this since I first heard about it in either 1999 or 2000.
Back then it was going to have every conceivable gadget, and be a 10 meter device.... Last I'd heard it's now down to 6-8 meters, and the gadgets have been reduced by half.


Apparently, it's a 6.5 meter "dish" now.....
Sad.
I recall how excited we all were when they said 10 meters and every conceivable gadget..... Admittedly, since tech has advanced so much since then, the tech that will be included will probably be far more advanced than the initial scheduled launch date.

https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/

Well...... grab a cup of cocoa, a nice warm blanket, and a seat to see what happens.
I'm know I'm ecstatic about it.

Very cool indeed - literally

I'm absolutely elated that this telescope did not suffer the same cultural delays that the Thirty Meter Telescope encountered. In order to correct atmospheric turbulence, the Thirty Meter Telescope must include adaptive and active optics, but unlike the James Webb, the number of planned optical diagnostic instruments hasn't decreased to date. Nonetheless, as you know, the James Webb space telescope does not require an expensive adaptive optics package as its location will be in a metastable second Lagrange point with a Sun, Earth, and Moon shield help to keep its instruments at cryogenic temperatures.

The primary mirror substrates are made of Beryllium with eighteen separate 1.32-meter gold-coated mechanically actuated hexagonal segments that align each mirror to within fractions of an angstrom. We have to get this telescope engineered perfectly since sending a technician to the second Lagrange point to provide corrective optics is not in the back-up plan.

James Webb Primary.JPG
 

SteveB

Well-known member
Very cool indeed - literally

I'm absolutely elated that this telescope did not suffer the same cultural delays that the Thirty Meter Telescope encountered. In order to correct atmospheric turbulence, the Thirty Meter Telescope must include adaptive and active optics, but unlike the James Webb, the number of planned optical diagnostic instruments hasn't decreased to date. Nonetheless, as you know, the James Webb space telescope does not require an expensive adaptive optics package as its location will be in a metastable second Lagrange point with a Sun, Earth, and Moon shield help to keep its instruments at cryogenic temperatures.

The primary mirror substrates are made of Beryllium with eighteen separate 1.32-meter gold-coated mechanically actuated hexagonal segments that align each mirror to within fractions of an angstrom. We have to get this telescope engineered perfectly since sending a technician to the second Lagrange point to provide corrective optics is not in the back-up plan.

View attachment 1001
It would indeed have been awesome to have a 30 meter scope on JWST.

I think what's so disappointing to me is that JWST decreased, after being touted to be 10 meters.
I think too that what we were told back then was that they'd be able to get all the way back to the beginning.

What I think will happen is that they'll reach what they thought was 200 million years, and realize/find/discover that the cosmos goes back even further, but they couldn't have known that with the Hubble.

So.... for now.... we wait.
The L1 point should sufficiently be free from gravitational disruptions. I hope it doesn't take too long. 1.2 million miles I'd think would be a 2 week trip, but I'd read years ago that they have to do a series of loops to get there. I.e., not like the moon trip.
 

inertia

Super Member
The telescope container with the payload arrives at Europe's Spaceport in the French Guiana staging area. 10/15/2021

JWST now at French Guiana Credit_ESA and CNES and Arianespace.JPG
Photograph credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace

Welcome to Kourou!

Kourou.JPG



Current launch date: 12/18/2021

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