A short defense of open theism...

Caroljeen

Well-known member
Many passages of Scripture depict God as foreknowing and/or predetermining certain things about the future. But there are also many passages that depict the future is open (not determined) and depict God as knowing it as a realm partly comprised of possibilities.

Some examples of these Scriptures include:

Classical theologians often consider only the passages that demonstrate that the future is settled either in God’s mind (foreknowledge) or in God’s will (predestination) as revealing the whole truth about God’s knowledge of the future. They interpret passages (such as the above) that suggest God faces a partly open future as merely figurative. I do not see this approach as warranted on either exegetical or theological grounds. I am therefore compelled to interpret both sets of passages as equally literal and therefore draw the conclusion that the future that God faces is partly open and partly settled.

 

Stephen

Well-known member
Amen.

God has free will. Like a loving parent responding to their children's good or bad behavior, he can, and does, change his mind. God changing his mind is one of the ways he expresses his deep love for his children.

Inability to change his mind when his children respond to his calling and correction would be psychopathic.
 

Caroljeen

Well-known member
Amen.

God has free will. Like a loving parent responding to their children's good or bad behavior, he can, and does, change his mind. God changing his mind is one of the ways he expresses his deep love for his children.

Inability to change his mind when his children respond to his calling and correction would be psychopathic.
The Open view also gives our prayers more meaning. Prayers can sway God and circumstances can be changed.
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
The Open view also gives our prayers more meaning. Prayers can sway God and circumstances can be changed.

One could argue that simply not knowing the future does not somehow make it undetermined.

See, determination is not at all based on knowledge and that is the big error constantly being foisted upon us by Calvinists and Open Thesists.

You know what you did yesterday, so it cannot change, do you feel this knowledge you have makes your past choice no longer free?

Take that same logic—and use it for your future choices that will one day be past.

Certainty does NOT equal necessity, it just shows the thing chosen.
 

Caroljeen

Well-known member
One could argue that simply not knowing the future does not somehow make it undetermined.
That isn't quite what Open Theism is all about. They would say that the future is open and not predetermined. The future is known by God in part as all possibilities. So God knows all possible choices and the results of those choice beforehand as possibilities. Those potential possibilities can be changed by our prayers. Our prayers can change things as opposed to the Calvinists view in which are prayers are meaningless in that God has already predetermined all things.

I didn't understand your answer. Would you rephrase it?
 

cjab

Well-known member
For humans the future is open, or as open as God has made it for them, whilst for God the future is already known. In order to interact with humans, God must contextualize the future as open. It's really a question of context. The human context requires uncertainty to be considered: in the context of heaven all things are known.
 
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