All the Fulness of Deity dwells in Him Bodily !

civic

Active member
Colossians 2:9
King James Bible
For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily

Now read the Greek below on the present ongoing meaning of DWELLS . The bodily dwelling of Deity is permanent not temporary. The Incarnation was PERMANENT.

κατοικεῖ (katoikei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2730: To dwell in, settle in, be established in (permanently), inhabit. From kata and oikeo; to house permanently, i.e. Reside.

8.2 σωματικός, ή, όν; σωματικῶςa: (derivatives of σῶμαa ‘body,’ 8.1) pertaining to a physical body—‘bodily, physical, bodily form.’[1] Louw Nida

Expositor's Greek Testament
Colossians 2:9. in Him and in Him alone.—κατοικεῖ: “permanently dwells”. The reference is to the Exalted State, not only on account of the present, but of the context and Paul’s Christology generally.—πᾶν τὸ πλήρωμα τῆς θεότητος: “all the fulness of the Godhead”. πᾶν is emphatic, the whole fulness dwells in Christ.

Body
sōmatikṓs (an adverb, derived from 4984 /sōmatikós which is an adjective derived from 4983 /sṓma, "body") – bodily(used only in Col 2:9)Loew & Nida Greek Lexicon

Never once in the NT is soma ever used of something nonphysical or immaterial .

Paul is talking in Col chapters 2-3 about the glorified resurrected Christ now seated at the right hand of God not the earthly Christ pre resurrection. This is a slam dunk that He is in a human glorified resurrection body and that He continues to have all the fullness of Deity dwelling bodily in the present.

Bodily (σωματικῶς) In bodily fashion or bodily-wise. The verse contains two distinct assertions: 1. That the fullness of the Godhead eternally dwells in Christ. The present tense κατοικεῖ dwelleth, is used like ἐστιν is (the image), Colossians 1:15, to denote an eternal and essential characteristic of Christ's being. The indwelling of the divine fullness in Him is characteristic of Him as Christ, from all ages and to all ages. Hence the fullness of the Godhead dwelt in Him before His incarnation, when He was "in the form of God" (Philippians 2:6). The Word in the beginning, was with God and was God (John 1:1). It dwelt in Him during His incarnation. It was the Word that became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth, and His glory which was beheld was the glory as of the Only begotten of the Father (John 1:14; compare 1 John 1:1-3). The fullness of the Godhead dwells in His glorified humanity in heaven.

2. The fullness of the Godhead dwells in Him in a bodily way, clothed the body. This means that it dwells in Him as one having a human body. This could not be true of His preincarnate state, when He was "in the form of God," for the human body was taken on by Him in the fullness of time, when "He became in the likeness of men" (Philippians 2:7), when the Word became flesh. The fullness of the Godhead dwelt in His person from His birth to His ascension. He carried His human body with Him into heaven, and in His glorified body now and ever dwells the fullness of the Godhead. Vincent Greek Word Studies


(2:9) Commenting on the contents of this verse, Lightfoot says; “The apostle justifies the foregoing charge that the doctrine was not according to Christ: ‘In Christ dwells the whole plērōma (πληρωμα) (fulness, plenitude), the entire fulness of the Godhead, whereas they represent it to you as dispersed among several spiritual agencies. Christ is the fountain-head of all spiritual life, whereas they teach you to seek it in communion with inferior creatures.’ ”

“Dwelleth” is katoikei (κατοικει). Oikeō (Ὀικεω) means “to be at home.” Kata (Κατα), prefixed, means “down,” thus showing permanence. The compound verb was used of the permanent residents of a town as compared with the transient community. The verb is in the present tense, showing durative action. The translation reads: “Because in Him there is continuously and permanently at home all the fulness of the Godhead in bodily fashion.”

Dwelleth imports more than a transient stay for a few minutes, or a little while, even abiding in him constantly and for ever, as dwelling most usually notes, 2 Corinthians 6:16. That which doth thus perpetually abide in his person, as denominated after the human nature, is all the fulness of the Godhead, viz. that rich and incomprehensible abundance of perfections, whereof the supreme and adorable nature is full; so that indeed there is not at all any perfection or excellency in the Divine nature but is found abiding in him. And after no common or ordinary way, but by a hypostatical or personal union of the Godhead with the manhood in Christ; which is not by way of mixture, confusion, conversion, or any other mutation;
 

civic

Active member
continued :


bodily, to exclude that inhabitation which is only by extrinsical denomination. It being an adverb, doth denote the manner as well as the subject; wherefore when he speaks of the temple of his body, John 2:21, that doth not fully reach the apostle’s meaning here: but it must be expounded personally, since in the Greek that which signifies with us a body, and so our English word body, is put for a person, Romans 12:1 2 Corinthians 5:10 Revelation 18:13: somebody or nobody, i.e. some person or no person. There is a presence of the Godhead general, by essence and power; particular, in the prophets and apostles working miracles: gracious, in all sanctified ones; glorious, in heaven, in light which no man can approach unto, 1 Timothy 6:16; relative, in the church visible and ordinances, typically under the law, and symbolically in the sacraments: but all these dwellings, or being present in the creature, fall short of that in the text, viz. bodily, connoting the personal habitation of the Deity in, and union of it with, the humanity of Christ, so close, and strait, and intimate, that the Godhead inhabiting and the manhood inhabited make but one and the same person, even as the reasonable soul and body in man make but one man. The way of the presence of the Deity with the humanity of Christ is above all those manners of the presence of God with angels and men. The Godhead dwells in him personally, in them in regard of assistance and energy: Godhead notes the truth of it; Christ was not only partaker of the Divine nature, 2 Peter 1:4, but the very Godhead dwells in him: it is not only the Divinity (as the Socinians, following the Vulgar Latin in this, would have it) but the Deity, the very nature and essence of God. Now it is observable, though in God himself Divinity and Deity be indeed the same, Romans 1:20, and may differ only from the manner of our conception and contemplation; yet here, when the enemies to Christ’s Deity might by their cavilling make more use of the word Divinity, (as when the soul of man is said to be a divine thing), to insinuate as if it here noted only the Divine will exclusive to the other attributes, (which exclusion the term all doth significantly prevent), the apostle puts in Deity or Godhead. Then lest Christ might (as by the Arians) be deemed a secondary God, or (as some since) a made god, inferior to the Father, he saith the fulness of the Godhead, which speaks him perfect God, coequal with the Father: further, connoting a numerical sameness of essence between the Godhead of the Father and the Son, all the fulness of the Godhead dwelleth in him. There is not one fulness of the Father and another of the Son, but one and the same singular Godhead in both, John 10:30. The fulness of the manhood in Adam and Eve were not numerically the same, but the Godhead of the Father and the Son is: yet is not the manhood of Christ co-extended and commensurate with the Godhead (as some Lutherans conceit); but where the manhood is, or Christ as man is, or hath his existence, there the fulness of the Godhead dwells bodily: so that this fulness is extended as the manhood only in which it is, and not as far as the Deity in which this derivative fulness is not as in its seat, though it be all originally from it, but inherently or subjectively in Christ. Matthew Poole

Conclusion: no one in the history of mankind has ever had all the fulness of Deity in them except Christ alone who is God manifest in the flesh. just as the Father and the Holy Spirit have all the fulness of Deity, so to does the Incarnate Son- Forever God in the flesh !

What a Marvelous Triune God we serve !

hope this helps !!!
 

Stephen

Active member
Paul is talking in Col chapters 2-3 about the glorified resurrected Christ now seated at the right hand of God not the earthly Christ pre resurrection. This is a slam dunk that He is in a human glorified resurrection body and that He continues to have all the fullness of Deity dwelling bodily in the present.

Read that closely, and I agree with this, Paul is speaking of the resurrected Christ, not the mortal Christ. And the Resurrected and Glorified Jesus is sitting next to God at present. Proving several things.
  • From the passage on Colossians, it cannot be claimed that during his mortal life that Jesus had the fullness of the Godhead dwelling in him bodily.
  • God is one person (not three), and Jesus is another person (and isn't God), because Jesus is sitting next to God.
  • Jesus is now a glorified human
This is an excellent understanding of the passage in Colossians.



Further, if you subscribe to the Trinity, this understanding of the passage makes the following things clear:
  • The word "Godhead" doesn't refer to the trinity, because Jesus is not the trinity.
  • The word "Godhead" doesn't refer to God, because God is sitting next to Jesus at the time the Godhead rests in him.
What an excellent repudiation of many of the Trinitarian arguments around this passage in Colossians.
 
Read that closely, and I agree with this, Paul is speaking of the resurrected Christ, not the mortal Christ. And the Resurrected and Glorified Jesus is sitting next to God at present. Proving several things.
  • From the passage on Colossians, it cannot be claimed that during his mortal life that Jesus had the fullness of the Godhead dwelling in him bodily.
  • God is one person (not three), and Jesus is another person (and isn't God), because Jesus is sitting next to God.
  • Jesus is now a glorified human
This is an excellent understanding of the passage in Colossians.



Further, if you subscribe to the Trinity, this understanding of the passage makes the following things clear:
  • The word "Godhead" doesn't refer to the trinity, because Jesus is not the trinity.
  • The word "Godhead" doesn't refer to God, because God is sitting next to Jesus at the time the Godhead rests in him.
What an excellent repudiation of many of the Trinitarian arguments around this passage in Colossians.
Then who did Isaiah see, he can see the Father as scripture say’s.
“Before Abraham, I am”

1 ¶ In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple.
2 Above it stood the seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly.
3 And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.
4 And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the house was filled with smoke.
5 ¶ Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.
 

Stephen

Active member
Then who did Isaiah see, he can see the Father as scripture say’s.
“Before Abraham, I am”

1 ¶ In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple.
2 Above it stood the seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly.
3 And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.
4 And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the house was filled with smoke.
5 ¶ Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.

Abraham saw Christ's day, he saw it and was glad.

Likewise, Isaiah, after witnessing the death of a mostly good king who erred in trying to do the priest's job, saw a vision of the Christ, the king priest after the order of Melchizedek.

What has this got to do with Colossians 2?
 
Abraham saw Christ's day, he saw it and was glad.

Likewise, Isaiah, after witnessing the death of a mostly good king who erred in trying to do the priest's job, saw a vision of the Christ, the king priest after the order of Melchizedek.

What has this got to do with Colossians 2?
Because you said Jesus isn’t God yet Isaiah saw God in real time.
It say’s the LORD in Isaiah.
“mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.”

Now again that would be impossible if it was the Father, Issaiah would have died.
Not impossible if Isaiah saw the WORD. John say’s speaking of Jesus wrote:
¶ In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

These things said Esaias, when he saw his glory, and spake of him.
 

Stephen

Active member
Because you said Jesus isn’t God yet Isaiah saw God in real time.
It say’s the LORD in Isaiah.
“mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.”
Now again that would be impossible if it was the Father, Issaiah would have died.

Not impossible if Isaiah saw the WORD. John say’s speaking of Jesus wrote:
¶ In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

These things said Esaias, when he saw his glory, and spake of him.

Yes, I agree that a prophet saw a prophetic vision of the future king. It is the sort of thing prophets do. Colossians 2 is speaking of the glorified king.

I don't know how John 1:1 applies as John 1:1 is speaking of the beginning of Christ's ministry and Isaiah 6 and Colossians 2 are speaking of Christ's present work.
 

civic

Active member
Yes, I agree that a prophet saw a prophetic vision of the future king. It is the sort of thing prophets do. Colossians 2 is speaking of the glorified king.

I don't know how John 1:1 applies as John 1:1 is speaking of the beginning of Christ's ministry and Isaiah 6 and Colossians 2 are speaking of Christ's present work.
John 1:1 - 1:4 is the beginning the same beginning in Genesis 1 - the Creation , the same Creator.

Its really unfortunate that you must read your doctrine into John 1 rather than reading the text and forming your doctrine from Johns Prologue.

hope this helps !!!
 

TrevorL

Member
Because you said Jesus isn’t God yet Isaiah saw God in real time.
It say’s the LORD in Isaiah.
“mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.”

Now again that would be impossible if it was the Father, Issaiah would have died.
Not impossible if Isaiah saw the WORD. John say’s speaking of Jesus wrote:
¶ In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

These things said Esaias, when he saw his glory, and spake of him.
Greetings Tanachreader,

I was interested in your post mainly because I have been very interested in Isaiah 6 for many years. Firstly I believe that Isaiah 6 is a vision of Jesus in glory in the future Kingdom, not an actual sighting the pre-existent Jesus in glory. One problem I have with your post is that you claim that Isaiah could not see the Father, but somehow he could see the Word. Where in Scripture can you substantiate this? The Scripture teaches that we cannot see God.

Kind regards
Trevor
 

Stephen

Active member
John 1:1 - 1:4 is the beginning the same beginning in Genesis 1 - the Creation , the same Creator.

Its really unfortunate that you must read your doctrine into John 1 rather than reading the text and forming your doctrine from Johns Prologue.

hope this helps !!!

Does this mean that you've now abandoned Colossians 2 as being related to the trinity and want to discuss John 1 instead?
 

civic

Active member
Read that closely, and I agree with this, Paul is speaking of the resurrected Christ, not the mortal Christ. And the Resurrected and Glorified Jesus is sitting next to God at present. Proving several things.
  • From the passage on Colossians, it cannot be claimed that during his mortal life that Jesus had the fullness of the Godhead dwelling in him bodily.
  • God is one person (not three), and Jesus is another person (and isn't God), because Jesus is sitting next to God.
  • Jesus is now a glorified human
This is an excellent understanding of the passage in Colossians.



Further, if you subscribe to the Trinity, this understanding of the passage makes the following things clear:
  • The word "Godhead" doesn't refer to the trinity, because Jesus is not the trinity.
  • The word "Godhead" doesn't refer to God, because God is sitting next to Jesus at the time the Godhead rests in him.
What an excellent repudiation of many of the Trinitarian arguments around this passage in Colossians.
You are going off topic and the focus is in the Person of Christ who is being called God bodily, meaning in His exalted state He is still God incarnate, in the flesh. Just as John 1:1 , John 1:14 declares and Matthew 1:23 even at His birth was God Incarnate. Jesus is Immutable- the same yesterday, today and forever. Hebrews 13:8

I have another thread discussing the Trinity if you want to discuss it in that thread.

hope this helps !!!
 

Stephen

Active member
You are going off topic and the focus is in the Person of Christ who is being called God bodily, meaning in His exalted state He is still God incarnate, in the flesh. Just as John 1:1 , John 1:14 declares and Matthew 1:23 even at His birth was God Incarnate. Jesus is Immutable- the same yesterday, today and forever. Hebrews 13:8

I have another thread discussing the Trinity if you want to discuss it in that thread.

hope this helps !!!

The topic is Colossians 2. Was I not directly engaging your analysis of Colossians 2.

As you analysis explained,
  • From the passage on Colossians, it cannot be claimed that during his mortal life that Jesus had the fullness of the Godhead dwelling in him bodily.
  • God is one person (not three), and Jesus is another person (and isn't God), because Jesus is sitting next to God.
  • Jesus is now a glorified human

And as the bible readily explains, Jesus died. That means he was certainly mutable before his glorification.

Do you wish to discuss Colossians 2, or do you wish to discuss the endless slew of new passages you've run off to?
 

civic

Active member
The topic is Colossians 2. Was I not directly engaging your analysis of Colossians 2.

As you analysis explained,
  • From the passage on Colossians, it cannot be claimed that during his mortal life that Jesus had the fullness of the Godhead dwelling in him bodily.
  • God is one person (not three), and Jesus is another person (and isn't God), because Jesus is sitting next to God.
  • Jesus is now a glorified human

And as the bible readily explains, Jesus died. That means he was certainly mutable before his glorification.

Do you wish to discuss Colossians 2, but rather wish to discuss the slew of new passages you've run off to?
The OP addressed in detail Colossians 2:9. You brought the Trinity into the discussion and separate Persons not me. You have changed the topic of Discussion and have gone off topic.

hope this helps !!!
 

Stephen

Active member
The OP addressed in detail Colossians 2:9. You brought the Trinity into the discussion and separate Persons not me. You have changed the topic of Discussion and have gone off topic.

hope this helps !!!

So when you stated "Christ now seated at the right hand of God", you aren't talking about separate persons? The grammar of the sentence seemed pretty clear that Christ is one person and God is another person and they have a spatial relationship to each other.

If you aren't talking about separate persons in this sentence, then can you show in a diagram where the two nouns (Christ and God) have the spatial relationship indicated (i.e. at the right hand) where these aren't separate persons.
 
Colossians 2:9
King James Bible
For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily

Now read the Greek below on the present ongoing meaning of DWELLS . The bodily dwelling of Deity is permanent not temporary. The Incarnation was PERMANENT.

κατοικεῖ (katoikei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2730: To dwell in, settle in, be established in (permanently), inhabit. From kata and oikeo; to house permanently, i.e. Reside.

8.2 σωματικός, ή, όν; σωματικῶςa: (derivatives of σῶμαa ‘body,’ 8.1) pertaining to a physical body—‘bodily, physical, bodily form.’[1] Louw Nida

Expositor's Greek Testament
Colossians 2:9. in Him and in Him alone.—κατοικεῖ: “permanently dwells”. The reference is to the Exalted State, not only on account of the present, but of the context and Paul’s Christology generally.—πᾶν τὸ πλήρωμα τῆς θεότητος: “all the fulness of the Godhead”. πᾶν is emphatic, the whole fulness dwells in Christ.

Body
sōmatikṓs (an adverb, derived from 4984 /sōmatikós which is an adjective derived from 4983 /sṓma, "body") – bodily(used only in Col 2:9)Loew & Nida Greek Lexicon

Never once in the NT is soma ever used of something nonphysical or immaterial .

Paul is talking in Col chapters 2-3 about the glorified resurrected Christ now seated at the right hand of God not the earthly Christ pre resurrection. This is a slam dunk that He is in a human glorified resurrection body and that He continues to have all the fullness of Deity dwelling bodily in the present.

Bodily (σωματικῶς) In bodily fashion or bodily-wise. The verse contains two distinct assertions: 1. That the fullness of the Godhead eternally dwells in Christ. The present tense κατοικεῖ dwelleth, is used like ἐστιν is (the image), Colossians 1:15, to denote an eternal and essential characteristic of Christ's being. The indwelling of the divine fullness in Him is characteristic of Him as Christ, from all ages and to all ages. Hence the fullness of the Godhead dwelt in Him before His incarnation, when He was "in the form of God" (Philippians 2:6). The Word in the beginning, was with God and was God (John 1:1). It dwelt in Him during His incarnation. It was the Word that became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth, and His glory which was beheld was the glory as of the Only begotten of the Father (John 1:14; compare 1 John 1:1-3). The fullness of the Godhead dwells in His glorified humanity in heaven.

2. The fullness of the Godhead dwells in Him in a bodily way, clothed the body. This means that it dwells in Him as one having a human body. This could not be true of His preincarnate state, when He was "in the form of God," for the human body was taken on by Him in the fullness of time, when "He became in the likeness of men" (Philippians 2:7), when the Word became flesh. The fullness of the Godhead dwelt in His person from His birth to His ascension. He carried His human body with Him into heaven, and in His glorified body now and ever dwells the fullness of the Godhead. Vincent Greek Word Studies


(2:9) Commenting on the contents of this verse, Lightfoot says; “The apostle justifies the foregoing charge that the doctrine was not according to Christ: ‘In Christ dwells the whole plērōma (πληρωμα) (fulness, plenitude), the entire fulness of the Godhead, whereas they represent it to you as dispersed among several spiritual agencies. Christ is the fountain-head of all spiritual life, whereas they teach you to seek it in communion with inferior creatures.’ ”

“Dwelleth” is katoikei (κατοικει). Oikeō (Ὀικεω) means “to be at home.” Kata (Κατα), prefixed, means “down,” thus showing permanence. The compound verb was used of the permanent residents of a town as compared with the transient community. The verb is in the present tense, showing durative action. The translation reads: “Because in Him there is continuously and permanently at home all the fulness of the Godhead in bodily fashion.”

Dwelleth imports more than a transient stay for a few minutes, or a little while, even abiding in him constantly and for ever, as dwelling most usually notes, 2 Corinthians 6:16. That which doth thus perpetually abide in his person, as denominated after the human nature, is all the fulness of the Godhead, viz. that rich and incomprehensible abundance of perfections, whereof the supreme and adorable nature is full; so that indeed there is not at all any perfection or excellency in the Divine nature but is found abiding in him. And after no common or ordinary way, but by a hypostatical or personal union of the Godhead with the manhood in Christ; which is not by way of mixture, confusion, conversion, or any other mutation;
Of course it is permanent and that is because this was written after Jesus was resurrected and had fulfilled all obedience unto God.

Therefore he was resurrected and ascended to the throne of God and as per the promise of God to David, that those anointed to be the heirs (Human Sons) from his lineage would and right up to the last and greatest of them all and which was Jesus Christ.

Also, the fact that all of the fullness of God's Divine nature hardly means that Jesus himself was God.

For if Paul believed Jesus was God, then it would be quite redundant to say that all of the fullness of God's Divine nature dwelt within him bodily. For that would be like saying all the fullness of God dwelt within him who is God.

By the way and while I have brought that up civic, don't you believe that the body of Jesus also belongs to God's being now that the Logos was made flesh?

After all you do believe that Jesus' blood was literally God's blood and belonging to his own nature now and as per your misinterpretation of Acts 20:28, don't you?

So then, if Paul believed Jesus was God in his full being and including his body and blood, for him to say that all of the fulness of the Divine nature dwelt within him bodily, would still be redundant if indeed Paul really believed Jesus was God and as you say he did.

Oh and by the way, when Paul said in Philippians 2 that Jesus made himself in the likeness (homoiomai) of men, that cannot mean that he made himself a man.

For that is not what that Greek word "homoiomai" means at all, but rather it means he made himself like other men when he was instead born much greater than any other men and beginning "huparchon) in the form "morphe" of God from his birth and which also doesn't mean he preexisted as God before he was born a man either.
 
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Colossians 2:9
King James Bible
For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily

Now read the Greek below on the present ongoing meaning of DWELLS . The bodily dwelling of Deity is permanent not temporary. The Incarnation was PERMANENT.

κατοικεῖ (katoikei)
Verb - Present Indicative Active - 3rd Person Singular
Strong's Greek 2730: To dwell in, settle in, be established in (permanently), inhabit. From kata and oikeo; to house permanently, i.e. Reside.

8.2 σωματικός, ή, όν; σωματικῶςa: (derivatives of σῶμαa ‘body,’ 8.1) pertaining to a physical body—‘bodily, physical, bodily form.’[1] Louw Nida

Expositor's Greek Testament
Colossians 2:9. in Him and in Him alone.—κατοικεῖ: “permanently dwells”. The reference is to the Exalted State, not only on account of the present, but of the context and Paul’s Christology generally.—πᾶν τὸ πλήρωμα τῆς θεότητος: “all the fulness of the Godhead”. πᾶν is emphatic, the whole fulness dwells in Christ.

Body
sōmatikṓs (an adverb, derived from 4984 /sōmatikós which is an adjective derived from 4983 /sṓma, "body") – bodily(used only in Col 2:9)Loew & Nida Greek Lexicon

Never once in the NT is soma ever used of something nonphysical or immaterial .

Paul is talking in Col chapters 2-3 about the glorified resurrected Christ now seated at the right hand of God not the earthly Christ pre resurrection. This is a slam dunk that He is in a human glorified resurrection body and that He continues to have all the fullness of Deity dwelling bodily in the present.

Bodily (σωματικῶς) In bodily fashion or bodily-wise. The verse contains two distinct assertions: 1. That the fullness of the Godhead eternally dwells in Christ. The present tense κατοικεῖ dwelleth, is used like ἐστιν is (the image), Colossians 1:15, to denote an eternal and essential characteristic of Christ's being. The indwelling of the divine fullness in Him is characteristic of Him as Christ, from all ages and to all ages. Hence the fullness of the Godhead dwelt in Him before His incarnation, when He was "in the form of God" (Philippians 2:6). The Word in the beginning, was with God and was God (John 1:1). It dwelt in Him during His incarnation. It was the Word that became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth, and His glory which was beheld was the glory as of the Only begotten of the Father (John 1:14; compare 1 John 1:1-3). The fullness of the Godhead dwells in His glorified humanity in heaven.

2. The fullness of the Godhead dwells in Him in a bodily way, clothed the body. This means that it dwells in Him as one having a human body. This could not be true of His preincarnate state, when He was "in the form of God," for the human body was taken on by Him in the fullness of time, when "He became in the likeness of men" (Philippians 2:7), when the Word became flesh. The fullness of the Godhead dwelt in His person from His birth to His ascension. He carried His human body with Him into heaven, and in His glorified body now and ever dwells the fullness of the Godhead. Vincent Greek Word Studies


(2:9) Commenting on the contents of this verse, Lightfoot says; “The apostle justifies the foregoing charge that the doctrine was not according to Christ: ‘In Christ dwells the whole plērōma (πληρωμα) (fulness, plenitude), the entire fulness of the Godhead, whereas they represent it to you as dispersed among several spiritual agencies. Christ is the fountain-head of all spiritual life, whereas they teach you to seek it in communion with inferior creatures.’ ”

“Dwelleth” is katoikei (κατοικει). Oikeō (Ὀικεω) means “to be at home.” Kata (Κατα), prefixed, means “down,” thus showing permanence. The compound verb was used of the permanent residents of a town as compared with the transient community. The verb is in the present tense, showing durative action. The translation reads: “Because in Him there is continuously and permanently at home all the fulness of the Godhead in bodily fashion.”

Dwelleth imports more than a transient stay for a few minutes, or a little while, even abiding in him constantly and for ever, as dwelling most usually notes, 2 Corinthians 6:16. That which doth thus perpetually abide in his person, as denominated after the human nature, is all the fulness of the Godhead, viz. that rich and incomprehensible abundance of perfections, whereof the supreme and adorable nature is full; so that indeed there is not at all any perfection or excellency in the Divine nature but is found abiding in him. And after no common or ordinary way, but by a hypostatical or personal union of the Godhead with the manhood in Christ; which is not by way of mixture, confusion, conversion, or any other mutation;
As soon as you said, "The incarnation was PERMANENT," I knew you were OFF-BASE covid, I mean civic. No SUCH thing as...INCARNATION. Not in the Text, at all sir.
 
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