Apologetics - A Walk On The Wild Side

Redeemed

Well-known member
The person free from the expectations of others is free to be his or her own person before God. This is genuine freedom.

I was told and I read in the rules that in the Apologetics forum were free to discuss whatever we like. Of course we have to do so in a civilized manner and respect each other. So I'm going for it!

I believe most people have no idea who they are, where they‘re heading, or why. Knowledge of life is necessary. Knowledge comes by experience, but it can also come by authoritative instruction. And that's where I believe the Bible comes into play.

All Scripture is God-breathed, and profitable for teaching, correction, training in righteousness, that the man of God may be equipped for every good work.” 2 Timothy 3:13

Then there's the value of theology. I've said many times that there are quite a few people on these forms that know what they're talking about, that are well-educated, and most importantly they are intelligent. There's been people like that for a long time and and some of them have helped us to understand the Bible for the last 2000 years. I know there's been quite a few that have gone off the rails and taught some weird, weird boogie-woogie. It's pretty easy to spot them in these modern times. But in earlier times they've run amok and who knew till they were passing out the Kool-Aid. I think they have one goal in mind and that's to make second Timothy 3:13 ineffective in your life and keeping you in bondage. To rob kill and destroy.

Now after all that gobbledygook let's engage in some theology about freedom in Christ.

I see the purpose of theology as not to tickle our intellects or emotions but to instruct us in the ways of God, so that we can grow up into maturity and fullness of obedience to Him.

“It was for freedom that Christ set us free” (Gal. 5:1).

The way I see biblical freedom is is that it's always expressed in contrast to bondage. I also see it as both freedom from something and freedom for something else. So then neither freedom nor slavery function alone; they are correlative states.

Paul Paul tells us about this freedom and our former slavery. In Romans 6, he declares that the grace and liberty we possess can never be a license to sin (it can't happen). This is because our freedom in Christ brings with it a definitive break from sin. Paul tells us that we who are in Christ “died to sin”... That's huge. That's what I call being free.

Paul goes on to say that not only are we dead to sin, but being dead, we are freed from sin. Without this freedom we would be still alive to sin; that is, sin was the reality TV show that we lived by. We were “slaves to sin.” Ever been there? I know I have. But freedom in Christ is so huge that Paul declares we are “set free from sin” and have now become “slaves of righteousness”

On top of that we are living sacrifices. But that'll be for another post.
 

Algernon

Member
“It was for freedom that Christ set us free” (Gal. 5:1).

The way I see biblical freedom is is that it's always expressed in contrast to bondage. I also see it as both freedom from something and freedom for something else. So then neither freedom nor slavery function alone; they are correlative states.

Paul Paul tells us about this freedom and our former slavery. In Romans 6, he declares that the grace and liberty we possess can never be a license to sin (it can't happen). This is because our freedom in Christ brings with it a definitive break from sin. Paul tells us that we who are in Christ “died to sin”... That's huge. That's what I call being free.

Paul goes on to say that not only are we dead to sin, but being dead, we are freed from sin. Without this freedom we would be still alive to sin; that is, sin was the reality TV show that we lived by. We were “slaves to sin.” Ever been there? I know I have. But freedom in Christ is so huge that Paul declares we are “set free from sin” and have now become “slaves of righteousness”

John 8
"34Jesus answered them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, everyone who commits sin is the slave of sin."
" 31 ...If you abide in My word, then you are truly disciples of Mine; 32and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.”
"36So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed. "

In the above, Jesus makes it clear what He meant by being made "free": Free from committing sin.

Yet the vast majority of Christians seem to believe that they have been made "free" even though they continue to commit sin. Unless you are a rare exception, this would be a belief that you hold.

Thoughts?
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
Sure I have thoughts. Actually some of my thoughts are sinful. Take the other day I'm driving down south on the 5 freeway on my way to La Jolla beautiful day. The ocean on my right side some beautiful lagoons on my left hand side. All of a sudden a car cuts in front of me from the fast lane so he can get off the exit ramp three lanes over.

I call that guy A straight up f OO L. (Under my breath of course, so my plastic Jesus on the dashboard of my car wouldn't hear it).

Jesus also made clear about what I had just done, you know I'm going With this right? Yep you guessed it right there in my car I became the same as a murderer. So yeah I guess I'm one of those people that say saved Christians still commit sins. Wait a minute it's in the Bible.

1 John 1:8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10 If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

What are your thoughts on that? I do appreciate your point of view and I thank you for posting on this thread. Looking forward to your reply. And by the way I'm not at all trying to be sarcastic just trying to keep things light and have a good time. So I do apologize if I seem rude.
 
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Gary Mac

Well-known member
Sure I have thoughts. Actually some of my thoughts are sinful. Take the other day I'm driving down south on the 5 freeway on my way to La Jolla beautiful day. The ocean on my right side some beautiful lagoons on my left hand side. All of a sudden a car cuts in front of me from the fast lane so he can get off the exit ramp three lanes over.

I call that guy A straight up f OO L. (Under my breath of course, so my plastic Jesus on the dashboard of my car wouldn't hear it).

Jesus also made clear about what I had just done, you know I'm going With this right? Yep you guessed it right there in my car I became the same as a murderer. So yeah I guess I'm one of those people that say saved Christians still commit sins. Wait a minute it's in the Bible.

1 John 1:8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10 If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

What are your thoughts on that? I do appreciate your point of view and I thank you for posting on this thread. Looking forward to your reply. And by the way I'm not at all trying to be sarcastic just trying to keep things light and have a good time. So I do apologize if I seem rude.
If some of your thoughts are sinful then you do not have the mind of Christ at all. for in Christ there is no sin, only those outside of Christ are sinners. Christ in you means you anointed of God as Jesus was anointed of God to walk as He walks in His same light.

DO you think Jesus thoughts was sinful? If so then you have made Jesus to think as you do/.
 

En Hakkore

Active member
I was told and I read in the rules that in the Apologetics forum were free to discuss whatever we like. Of course we have to do so in a civilized manner and respect each other. So I'm going for it!
I'm a few days away from taking a three-week vacation from CARM and now you decide to take a walk on the wild side! :D

I believe most people have no idea who they are, where they‘re heading, or why. Knowledge of life is necessary. Knowledge comes by experience, but it can also come by authoritative instruction. And that's where I believe the Bible comes into play.

All Scripture is God-breathed, and profitable for teaching, correction, training in righteousness, that the man of God may be equipped for every good work.” 2 Timothy 3:13

Then there's the value of theology. I've said many times that there are quite a few people on these forms that know what they're talking about, that are well-educated, and most importantly they are intelligent. There's been people like that for a long time and and some of them have helped us to understand the Bible for the last 2000 years. I know there's been quite a few that have gone off the rails and taught some weird, weird boogie-woogie. It's pretty easy to spot them in these modern times. But in earlier times they've run amok and who knew till they were passing out the Kool-Aid. I think they have one goal in mind and that's to make second Timothy 3:13 ineffective in your life and keeping you in bondage. To rob kill and destroy.
I believe the text to which you refer is 2 Tim 3:16-17. Based on your comments above, we have very different approaches to the Bible... I would categorize parts of it as inspiring rather than inspired and the whole as culturally-bound rather than timeless. As such, its profitability is limited... it is thus best used as paradigm rather than prescription. Themes of liberation, justice, forgiveness, care for the poor and downtrodden, maintaining hope through pain and suffering, etc. are intermingled with some truly disturbing ideas and practices that need to be filtered out through a critical lens that is sensitive to the real harm these have caused people through the centuries. What remains are inspiring stories that can help people navigate the uncertainties, disappointments and tribulations of life... as they have for nearly three thousand years.

Kind regards,
Jonathan
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
I'm a few days away from taking a three-week vacation from CARM and now you decide to take a walk on the wild side! :D


I believe the text to which you refer is 2 Tim 3:16-17. Based on your comments above, we have very different approaches to the Bible... I would categorize parts of it as inspiring rather than inspired and the whole as culturally-bound rather than timeless. As such, its profitability is limited... it is thus best used as paradigm rather than prescription. Themes of liberation, justice, forgiveness, care for the poor and downtrodden, maintaining hope through pain and suffering, etc. are intermingled with some truly disturbing ideas and practices that need to be filtered out through a critical lens that is sensitive to the real harm these have caused people through the centuries. What remains are inspiring stories that can help people navigate the uncertainties, disappointments and tribulations of life... as they have for nearly three thousand years.

Kind regards,
Jonathan
I love a good sense of humor, I'm going to miss you. I have to be honest with you, for me to understand your post about the Bible I'm gonna have to study it out. I'm thinking when it comes to smarts your pay grade is higher than mine. But that's exactly why I come here. With that in mind what do you think about the Bible being living word. What I'm getting at is say one person is not very educated maybe not that intelligent, do you think the Bible may speak to them on there level? So that they could really understand it's message?

And then to go to the other extreme, do you think one could be to intelligent to believe and understand the Bible? Say they read it and come to their own conclusion based on their intellect and be deceiving themselves?

I don't know how well I'm explaining this but I hope you get the idea of what I'm trying to figure out and could offer some advice.
 

En Hakkore

Active member
I love a good sense of humor, I'm going to miss you. I have to be honest with you, for me to understand your post about the Bible I'm gonna have to study it out. I'm thinking when it comes to smarts your pay grade is higher than mine.
My paycheck must have got lost in the mail! :D

But that's exactly why I come here. With that in mind what do you think about the Bible being living word. What I'm getting at is say one person is not very educated maybe not that intelligent, do you think the Bible may speak to them on there level? So that they could really understand it's message?

And then to go to the other extreme, do you think one could be to intelligent to believe and understand the Bible? Say they read it and come to their own conclusion based on their intellect and be deceiving themselves?

I don't know how well I'm explaining this but I hope you get the idea of what I'm trying to figure out and could offer some advice.
Yes, I understand what you're saying and would be more than happy to comment. Unfortunately, I need to go to work now -- gotta pay the bills because of the lost check -- so I'll be back this evening to respond. Enjoy your day!

Kind regards,
Jonathan
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
My paycheck must have got lost in the mail! :D


Yes, I understand what you're saying and would be more than happy to comment. Unfortunately, I need to go to work now -- gotta pay the bills because of the lost check -- so I'll be back this evening to respond. Enjoy your day!

Kind regards,
Jonathan
Your paycheck joke goes to prove my point as it took me a while to figure it out. But I got it that's the main thing.
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
I'm a few days away from taking a three-week vacation from CARM and now you decide to take a walk on the wild side! :D


I believe the text to which you refer is 2 Tim 3:16-17. Based on your comments above, we have very different approaches to the Bible... I would categorize parts of it as inspiring rather than inspired and the whole as culturally-bound rather than timeless. As such, its profitability is limited... it is thus best used as paradigm rather than prescription. Themes of liberation, justice, forgiveness, care for the poor and downtrodden, maintaining hope through pain and suffering, etc. are intermingled with some truly disturbing ideas and practices that need to be filtered out through a critical lens that is sensitive to the real harm these have caused people through the centuries. What remains are inspiring stories that can help people navigate the uncertainties, disappointments and tribulations of life... as they have for nearly three thousand years.

Kind regards,
Jonathan
Okay now I understand what your post saying. I'm blaming the reason I didn't understand it before was was too early in my brain electrons weren't functioning properly. But I'm good to go now. And while you're on your three week vacation... Not to worry tear it up for you. I'm gonna hit it so hard I'll probably crash the board and there be a new one when you get back.
 

En Hakkore

Active member
With that in mind what do you think about the Bible being living word.
I would say that this concept (as you implicitly define it through your subsequent questions) is compatible with your understanding of the biblical texts (inspired), but not with mine (inspiring). As I identify below what I understand to be the significant differences between our two approaches to the Bible, please let me know if anything I write does not accurately represent your belief...

Inspired implies a divine agent (ie. God) who has infused the biblical texts with certain timeless truths... this inspiration occurred in the past when the texts were written and, while they have been sufficiently preserved so their truths are available to subsequent readers down through the centuries (in this sense it is a 'living word'), the moment of inspiration and God's role as the agent of this inspiration are key.

Inspiring, on the other hand, shifts focus from an event in the past to the reader's engagement with the text in the present... while divine inspiration could play a role in this approach, it is not a necessary or key component --- the focus of the engagement is on one person's or community's experience anchored to circumstances in the past (in this sense it is not a 'living word') inspiring another person or community in the present.

What I'm getting at is say one person is not very educated maybe not that intelligent, do you think the Bible may speak to them on there level? So that they could really understand it's message?
With the clarification above on the differences between inspired and inspiring, I can interact with your questions from both perspectives. That the Bible might have a single message available to those who read it assumes the first approach... the intention of the divine Author responsible for the text being paramount. The question then is whether this Author intends his written message to be understood by everyone irrespective of their levels of education and intelligence. The average person does not have a working knowledge of the languages in which the biblical texts were written so is necessarily reliant on the higher education and linguistic expertise of translators even to access the Bible... the existence of diverse theological frameworks, thick commentaries and even discussion forums like this compound the problem of what expertise may be required to understand whatever message the Author intends to convey.

The inspiring approach wrestles with the same issues, not to ascertain the divine Author's timeless meaning, but the human authors' culture-bound meanings. That said, those who approach the Bible in this manner typically do not view these texts as unique in their inspiring potential and would affirm others' use of different texts for this same purpose or no texts at all, in which case necessary expertise evaporates altogether. Indeed, understanding the general themes for which sacred texts are typically read for inspiration that I referred to in my earlier post are not contingent on anyone's level of education or intelligence... people of all ages and education levels can, in their own ways, understand principles of fairness, empathize with those in pain and show compassion.

And then to go to the other extreme, do you think one could be to intelligent to believe and understand the Bible? Say they read it and come to their own conclusion based on their intellect and be deceiving themselves?
I've touched somewhat on this already... I would just add that there are a lot of harmful ideologies that have been developed by intelligent people and a lot of uneducated people who brim with love and compassion toward those with whom we share this planet --- what is important is not one's intelligence or education levels, but their starting assumptions and core values.

Kind regards,
Jonathan
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
Thank you so much! I'm going to copy and paste that and put it in my notes and study it out. That post was so good I'm rather stunned at the moment. That's it I'm not buying any more books I'm going to just read your posts.
 

Algernon

Member
Sorry I didn't back to this sooner. Tried to respond yesterday evening, but the site wasn't available.

1 John 1:8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10 If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

What are your thoughts on that?

People often take 1 John1:8-10 out of context and make as if it says things it doesn't. Not sure what point or points you were trying to make here, but...

1 John 1
5This then is the message which we have heard of him, and declare unto you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. 6If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth: 7But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. 8If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

For example, in 1:7 "the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin" is conditional as denoted by "if we walk in the light, as he is in the light". Only those who "walk in the light, as he is in the light" are cleansed. It doesn't make logical sense that an individual can "walk in the light, as he is in the light" and continue to commit sin. Especially given what immediately precedes it: "...God is light, and in him is no darkness at all If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth".

The above is also logically consistent with what the author says in 1 John 3:
4Whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law: for sin is the transgression of the law. 5And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins; and in him is no sin. 6Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him. 7Little children, let no man deceive you: he that doeth righteousness is righteous, even as he is righteous. 8He that committeth sin is of the devil; for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil. 9Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God. 10In this the children of God are manifest, and the children of the devil: whosoever doeth not righteousness is not of God, neither he that loveth not his brother.

Those that commit sin are "of the devil". Those that are born of God "doth not commit sin".

Putting 1 John 1:5-10 in context of 1 John 3:4-10, how can an individual "walk in the light, as he is in the light", yet be "of the devil"?

Your seeming allusion to Matthew 5:21-22 is also problematic.

21Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time, Thou shalt not kill; and whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment: 22But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire.

Especially in light of what Jesus says here:

Matthew 23
15Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte, and when he is made, ye make him twofold more the child of hell than yourselves.
16Woe unto you, ye blind guides, which say, Whosoever shall swear by the temple, it is nothing; but whosoever shall swear by the gold of the temple, he is a debtor!
17Ye fools and blind: for whether is greater, the gold, or the temple that sanctifieth the gold?

Also, it would be helpful if you could directly address what Jesus explicitly states in John 8:34,31,36 instead of talking around it.
 
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Redeemed

Well-known member
Well thank you for getting back to me especially with such an informative post. I think I'm going to stop trying to make a point and go back to learning things and studying things out. I think I got chaired away with myself. I'm really interested with the stuff you guys talk about here. I think I just got a information overload. I caught myself wanting to go through the Bible this morning. Maybe I just need a break ...I'm going to put myself on ignore. I'm going to copy and paste your post and put it in my study notes and I'll go over it and look at everything.
 

Algernon

Member
Well thank you for getting back to me especially with such an informative post. I think I'm going to stop trying to make a point and go back to learning things and studying things out. I think I got chaired away with myself. I'm really interested with the stuff you guys talk about here. I think I just got a information overload. I caught myself wanting to go through the Bible this morning. Maybe I just need a break ...I'm going to put myself on ignore. I'm going to copy and paste your post and put it in my study notes and I'll go over it and look at everything.

When you feel comfortable, post a response in this thread. I'll b e interested in seeing what you have to say about my previous post.

What you've written above is a really positive sign. It's refreshing to come across someone who is truly trying to understand. The The Parable of the Talents speaks to this. Many seem content to mindlessly parrot back what others have told them or what they've read in books.
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
When you feel comfortable, post a response in this thread. I'll b e interested in seeing what you have to say about my previous post.

What you've written above is a really positive sign. It's refreshing to come across someone who is truly trying to understand. The The Parable of the Talents speaks to this. Many seem content to mindlessly parrot back what others have told them or what they've read in books.
Will do I'm going to bookmark your post I haven't tried that before And tomorrow study it out.
 

En Hakkore

Active member
Thank you so much! I'm going to copy and paste that and put it in my notes and study it out. That post was so good I'm rather stunned at the moment. That's it I'm not buying any more books I'm going to just read your posts.
You're welcome and thanks. Of course, I highly recommend a broader library than CARM posts... whether they be my own or those of others. :) Even if we don't agree with everything or even most of what others write, we can always learn from it in some fashion... be it to understand things from the perspective of others and empathize with them or to sharpen the defense of those positions we currently hold.

Kind regards,
Jonathan
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
You're welcome and thanks. Of course, I highly recommend a broader library than CARM posts... whether they be my own or those of others. :) Even if we don't agree with everything or even most of what others write, we can always learn from it in some fashion... be it to understand things from the perspective of others and empathize with them or to sharpen the defense of those positions we currently hold.

Kind regards,
Jonathan
Looks like I need you to start writing a book then. I know you can do it. Of course you realize I want a signed copy. But seriously folks. Just that short post right there makes a tremendous amount of sense. And that's exactly where I'm coming from.
 

Redeemed

Well-known member
John 8
"34Jesus answered them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, everyone who commits sin is the slave of sin."
" 31 ...If you abide in My word, then you are truly disciples of Mine; 32and you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free.”
"36So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed. "

In the above, Jesus makes it clear what He meant by being made "free": Free from committing sin.

Yet the vast majority of Christians seem to believe that they have been made "free" even though they continue to commit sin. Unless you are a rare exception, this would be a belief that you hold.

Thoughts?
Hi Algernon, Okay I've calmed down now and I thank you for your concern. No I'm not the rare exception and yes that is a belief that I hold. I'd love to discuss it with an hear what your beliefs are. I have study this out pretty good over a long period time and I'm pretty sure I can present my points clearly once we clarify exactly what were talking about. The reason I say that is because this is actually a huge issue. And I'm sure we could discuss it for days which is fine with me.

One of the things I believe about sin and this may fit in with your point of view as far as sin goes. I believe that Jesus dealt with sin on the cross. That's huge and somewhat complex as far as all the different aspects of forgiveness. So my way of thinking goes... if Jesus dealt with sin on the cross it's no longer a sin issue. The sin issue has been taken out of the way. What I need to deal with now that I'm no longer a slave to sin but a slave to righteousness is obedience. It's now an issue of my being obedient. I wish I was one of those Greek and Hebrew scholar guys because I'd like to see the correlation between sin and disobedience. Because I'm looking at where I think you're coming from and saying to myself while maybe he's right. It's like that thing we hear about Christians not being sinless he just sin less. I'm wondering if that sin less could just be disobedience. I don't know maybe somebody's reading this and their thinking "dude disobedience is sin" and they're probably right.

Say I mock and ridicule my neighbor by making a joke about their behavior to my wife. And my wife gets on my case and brings it to my attention that Jesus has commanded me to love my neighbor. So I felt guilty and ashamed for making a a derogatory joke about my neighbor. So I go to God and I pray in Jesus name for Him to forgive me of that sin. Bible says that if I do then:

I believe then he is faithful and just to forgive all my sins and cleanse me of all unrighteousness.1 John 1:9

See right I start getting confused because the Bible says sins but in my head I can turn that around to saying I was just being disobedient to what Jesus commanded me to do.

So that's my dilemma.

I'm interested in what you have to say about this as far as your post and your thoughts. You asked for mine and now I'm asking yours. And I do believe yours are going to be very interesting.
 

En Hakkore

Active member
Looks like I need you to start writing a book then. I know you can do it.
Well, I churned out a 200+ page thesis last year and my sabbatical from here is to get some solid writing in over the holidays on the book I started on after that. I was hoping to have it published next year, but a certain worldwide pandemic threw a wrench into those plans! It's now on more of a slow burn to complete... 2023/24 maybe?

Of course you realize I want a signed copy.
It will probably have to be virtual signed in a post-COVID world, though a bigger impediment would be that I keep my CARM and academic lives strictly separate... you could wind up reading it without making the connection to me! The book has very little to do with anything I discuss here on CARM, but is in the areas of cultural and film studies... I will touch briefly on Jesus/Bible in film, "religious" horrors and evangelical filmmaking that might be of some interest to you and others here, but my focus is elsewhere.

But seriously folks. Just that short post right there makes a tremendous amount of sense. And that's exactly where I'm coming from.
Now don't get too "wild" in your thread while I'm away... I look forward to picking up with you when I'm back. In the meantime, keep safe and have a Merry Christmas! :cool:

Kind regards,
Jonathan

 

Algernon

Member
Have to say I'm more than a bit perplexed by your response. Hopefully you can help me to better understand your position.

One of the things I believe about sin and this may fit in with your point of view as far as sin goes. I believe that Jesus dealt with sin on the cross. That's huge and somewhat complex as far as all the different aspects of forgiveness. So my way of thinking goes... if Jesus dealt with sin on the cross it's no longer a sin issue. The sin issue has been taken out of the way. What I need to deal with now that I'm no longer a slave to sin but a slave to righteousness is obedience. It's now an issue of my being obedient.

As best as I can figure out, the premise of your position is that since "Jesus dealt with sin on the cross", going against the ways of God is now merely "disobedience" rather than "sin". And what Jesus explicitly states about committing sin in John 8:34,31,36 is no longer of importance. And similarly that what the author says in 1 John 1:5-8, 10 and 1 John 3:4-10 is no longer of importance.

Do I understand you correctly? If not, where do John 8:34,31,36 and 1 John 1:5-8, 10 and 1 John 3:4-10 fit?
 
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