Authority Required?

Aaron32

Well-known member
Sacrifices in the Old Testament required to be performed by priesthood authority.

If Christians are to "present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God", and baptism is witnessing that, is baptism to be performed by someone holding authority?
 
Sacrifices in the Old Testament required to be performed by priesthood authority.

If Christians are to "present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God", and baptism is witnessing that, is baptism to be performed by someone holding authority?
Apart from that characterization of baptism, the baptized believes are the body of Christ. The One to whom was given all authority in heaven and Earth.
 
Sacrifices in the Old Testament required to be performed by priesthood authority.

If Christians are to "present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God", and baptism is witnessing that, is baptism to be performed by someone holding authority?
See Matthew 28:18-20.

"And Jesus came and said to them, "All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age."" - Matthew 28:18-20 RSV​
You could hardly have more authority than that…
 
See Matthew 28:18-20.

"And Jesus came and said to them, "All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age."" - Matthew 28:18-20 RSV​
You could hardly have more authority than that…
True, but his audience was the 11 remaining apostles, not all of his disciples in general.
 
True, but his audience was the 11 remaining apostles, not all of his disciples in general.
So no one has been authentically in reception of Christian baptism since the death of John? I'm sorry, I can't accept that limited reading of the passage.
 
So no one has been authentically in reception of Christian baptism since the death of John? I'm sorry, I can't accept that limited reading of the passage.
No, clearly many were baptized in the Book of Acts.
 
Sacrifices in the Old Testament required to be performed by priesthood authority.

If Christians are to "present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God", and baptism is witnessing that, is baptism to be performed by someone holding authority?

To baptize "in the name of Jesus Christ" means a servant doing something in the name of his Lord, that is, by his Lord's authority.
 
I'm not sure if that answers my question.
The one to Whom all authority in heaven and earth was given sent out His previously baptized disciples, His body, to baptize and teach all peoples.

If a person concludes that Jesus only spoke to the eleven then the question is how did the eleven understand that imperative, command, or commission? Obviously, neither that section of Scripture or any other passage of Scripture says only those you eleven baptize and teach will be saved.

An easy way to see how the eleven understood it is through Paul's letter to the believers at Rome. While it is true that Paul was not one of the eleven, it is also true that in preaching the gospel of Christ, that which has been revealed or apocalypsed regarding Christ to and for all men, to those saints at Rome he said:

“2. God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? 3. Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?...” (Rom 6:2-3..., KJVA)

There is no qualifier such as as many of us as were baptized by an Apostle, or baptized by a specially authorized class of Christian. This is also true in the case of the Apostle Paul who was baptized by an anonymous Christian.

More importantly, Scripture plainly says that baptism does now save you through the resurrection of Christ. It categorically does not say that the one administering baptism does now save you through the resurrection of Christ.

The one who knows and believes the true gospel of Jesus Christ receives what Scripture actually says and means according to the immediate context in which it was given. That one does not go around redefining terms and searching for proof texts that he thinks can be used to support this or that imagined doctrine.
 
The one to Whom all authority in heaven and earth was given sent out His previously baptized disciples, His body, to baptize and teach all peoples.

If a person concludes that Jesus only spoke to the eleven then the question is how did the eleven understand that imperative, command, or commission? Obviously, neither that section of Scripture or any other passage of Scripture says only those you eleven baptize and teach will be saved.

An easy way to see how the eleven understood it is through Paul's letter to the believers at Rome. While it is true that Paul was not one of the eleven, it is also true that in preaching the gospel of Christ, that which has been revealed or apocalypsed regarding Christ to and for all men, to those saints at Rome he said:

“2. God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? 3. Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?...” (Rom 6:2-3..., KJVA)

There is no qualifier such as as many of us as were baptized by an Apostle, or baptized by a specially authorized class of Christian. This is also true in the case of the Apostle Paul who was baptized by an anonymous Christian.

More importantly, Scripture plainly says that baptism does now save you through the resurrection of Christ. It categorically does not say that the one administering baptism does now save you through the resurrection of Christ.

The one who knows and believes the true gospel of Jesus Christ receives what Scripture actually says and means according to the immediate context in which it was given. That one does not go around redefining terms and searching for proof texts that he thinks can be used to support this or that imagined doctrine.

The earliest post-Pentecost followers of Jesus did not suppose putting faith in Jesus was one thing but water baptism was another. Everyone comprehended that water baptism was HOW one puts his faith in Christ since water baptism is how one dies to the flesh together with Christ.
 
Oh really?

Tell it to your Lutheran peers
That would be pointless since they already know it.

Are you one of those who imagine a relative pronoun into Mark 16:16 so that faith refers to something that isn't in the passage? Something like, He who believed this [other thing] and is baptized will be saved.. "
 
Not pitting faith against baptism is a good start, but it is plain that baptism into Christ is a free gift. The one being baptized is passive.
Baptism is a command.
Acts 10:48
And he commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord. Then prayed they him to tarry certain days.
 
Two things, the ones to be baptized are passive in their baptism, they aren't the active agent in their baptism. See the verb translated as "be baptized "

The other thing to note is the immediate context. It was a unique situation in which the words "forbid" and "command" are paired because what occurred before their eyes was the fulfillment of the vision to those who were slow to understand and act on the Lord's command to disciple alll peoples by baptizing and teaching them, see Matthew 28:19-20.
 
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Baptism is only a command to act to his previously baptized disciples as a means by which they were to disciple all peoples along with teaching. The Verb is disciple and the participles are baptize and teach. End of story.
No, it only seems like babble to the confused and the unbeliever since Christians with a right understanding of the pericope know that the command of the Lord is not subject to the opinion of His disciples. Do you really want to say that a disciple of the Lord has the authority to forbid what the Lord has commanded? The right answer to that question is of course not.
It is a demonstration of the difference between a command from the Lord for a person to act, that is, the baptized disciples of Christ were to disciple by baptizing and teaching, and Peter commanding a passive to remove all doubt from those who had received that command of the Lord that the Gentiles were to be baptized. That is implicit if not explicit in Peter's explanation of the event in chapter eleven.

"So he ordered that they be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Then they asked Peter to stay with them for a few days." Acts 10:48 NIV.
 
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Sacrifices in the Old Testament required to be performed by priesthood authority.

If Christians are to "present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God", and baptism is witnessing that, is baptism to be performed by someone holding authority?
Addressing the OP only, I agree with Thistle, are we not Priest in Christ Jesus? let's check the record. Revelation 1:5 "And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, "Revelation 1:6 "And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen."
and we are a priesthood in Christ. 1 Peter 2:9 "But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light:"

PICJAG, 101G
 
Addressing the OP only, I agree with Thistle, are we not Priest in Christ Jesus? let's check the record. Revelation 1:5 "And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, "Revelation 1:6 "And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen."
and we are a priesthood in Christ. 1 Peter 2:9 "But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light:"

PICJAG, 101G
1:6 "And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen."
It says God and his father of Jesus. Therefore God is Jesus' father.
 
Baptism is only a command to act to his previously baptized disciples as a means by which they were to disciple all peoples along with teaching. The Verb is disciple and the participles are baptize and teach. End of story.
Nonsense...baptism is a command to everyone who believes...
Mark 16:16
He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned.
 
Baptism is a command.
Acts 10:48
And he commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord. Then prayed they him to tarry certain days.
The command to be baptized applies only to those who would be saved from the damnation that they have already earned. It is not a sin, not to be baptized. We simply will be damned for the sins that we actually have committed, if we refuse gospel commands which come from God as he exercises his authority as our Redeemer.

From God's authority as our Sovereign we are absolutely obligated to obey his moral law. Failure to do that perpetually, cumulatively, and perfectly results in our damnation. From God's authority as our Creator we are obligated to be holy as he is holy, so as not to offend our Creator. Failure to be holy as God is holy results in damnnation, but for grace, to which we are rightly consigned.

But whether God is your Redeemer or not is a choice that you make. God does not have to be your Redeemer, God wants to be your Redeemer. So when he commands you to be baptized, as your Redeemer, you are not sinning against an absolute obligation you have to God. You are sinning against God's beneficent grace and mercy toward you. It is categorically different from a sin for which we are properly damned. We are damned for violating our absolute obligations to God not for violating God's beneficent intentions for us.
 
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