Catholics praying the Psalms

Atemi

Well-known member
I constantly hear Catholics boast about how they pray the psalms.

Well I was reading probably the most well known Psalm the other day, and was reminded of yet another part of the Word that Roman Catholics have to reject.

David, in Psalm 23, declares confidently at the end:

Surely your goodness and love will follow me
all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord

forever.

Right there, the Catholic has to stop and admit that this Scripture is not speaking about them....and thus they have to stop praying that Psalm at verse 5.

David says what no Roman Catholic can accept:

"Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Even David knew he would have eternal life.
 
I constantly hear Catholics boast about how they pray the psalms.

Well I was reading probably the most well known Psalm the other day, and was reminded of yet another part of the Word that Roman Catholics have to reject.

David, in Psalm 23, declares confidently at the end:

Surely your goodness and love will follow me
all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord

forever.

Right there, the Catholic has to stop and admit that this Scripture is not speaking about them....and thus they have to stop praying that Psalm at verse 5.

David says what no Roman Catholic can accept:

"Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Even David knew he would have eternal life.
RC can say words over and over again but they do not think through about how the words do not back up what they are taught.

This the psalm that I find extremely comforting.
 
David, in Psalm 23, declares confidently at the end:

Surely your goodness and love will follow me
all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord

forever.


"Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."


Even David knew he would have eternal life.
The Psalms are an example of Scriptures that are meant to be taken more metaphorical than literal. In particular, this Psalm uses the metaphor a shepherd caring for his sheep to illustrate the love that God has for them. This is obvious by the fact that no qualifier is mentioned, like the ones on Paul's letters, for "living in the house of the Lord" that would make anyone think it applied to anyone other than David.
 
David, in Psalm 23, declares confidently at the end:

Surely your goodness and love will follow me
all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord

forever.



"Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Even David knew he would have eternal life.
The Psalms are an example of Scriptures that are meant to be taken more metaphorical than literal.

Hahahaha.

More unbelief from you.

David says he surely will have eternal life....but LifeIn knows better! LOL.

Don't worry. When you Catholics are praying this Psalm, you can just skip verse 6 because your confession is that it does not apply to you.

David had more hope than Roman Catholics.
 
Hahahaha.

More unbelief from you.

David says he surely will have eternal life....but LifeIn knows better! LOL.

Don't worry. When you Catholics are praying this Psalm, you can just skip verse 6 because your confession is that it does not apply to you.

David had more hope than Roman Catholics.
Yep they think the words of scripture are to be taken as literal when it suits them and then they are metaphorical when it suits. Jesus is our shepherd.

Jesus said He is:

11 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. (john 10:11)

This is a clear connection with the psalm. This also shows why the RCC is not His church, they do not protect the sheep, they harm the sheep.

Yep Jesus being a good shepherd is metaphorical, but wine being his blood is literal. For RCs the scriptures are really confusing they don't want is literal and what isn't and then their are whole books they don't believe are literal.
 
When you Catholics are praying this Psalm, you can just skip verse 6 because your confession is that it does not apply to you.

David had more hope than Roman Catholics.
David was expressing his feelings in the Psalm. He was not laying down doctrine. That's what comes of treating every book of the bible exactly the same. They are not all of the same genre. Psalms are inspirational songs.
 
Jesus is our shepherd.

Jesus said He is:

11 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. (john 10:11)

This is a clear connection with the psalm.
The connection is a common one - the image of God as a shepherd of his people. It does not mean every bible verse that uses it is using it for exactly the same purpose. In the case of John 10:11, the image of the shepherd is told from the point of view of the shepherd. In the case of the Psalm 23, it is from the point of view of the sheep. Two different purposes for the same image.
 
David was expressing his feelings in the Psalm. He was not laying down doctrine. That's what comes of treating every book of the bible exactly the same. They are not all of the same genre. Psalms are inspirational songs.
David is described:

Acts 13:22

And when he had removed him, he raised up David to be their king, of whom he testified and said, ‘I have found in David the son of Jesse a man after my heart, who will do all my will.’

eze 34:23

And I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd

It is interesting how many verses in scripture describe David or are about David. He is a good shepherd unlike the RCC. He feeds the sheep, he feeds them the truth because he is a good shepherd. The RCC feeds them a false gospel. Nothing like David.

The psalm is a great insight into the love our Lord has for us. He is a good shepherd, he will not lose us.
 
The connection is a common one - the image of God as a shepherd of his people. It does not mean every bible verse that uses it is using it for exactly the same purpose. In the case of John 10:11, the image of the shepherd is told from the point of view of the shepherd. In the case of the Psalm 23, it is from the point of view of the sheep. Two different purposes for the same image.
It is the same. The psalm and the verse from John give us a good understanding of who Jesus is and what he does. No they have the same purpose, to show we can trust Jesus. No other purpose at all. We know we cannot trust the RCC because it lies, this proves who its father is and it harms the sheep, so it does not follow Jesus who is the good shepherd.

The sheep cannot have that view of the RCC at all - after it has tortured and maimed the sheep, it has abused the sheep, it has lied to the sheep etc.
 
eze 34:23

And I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd
This is yet another very different instance of using the image of the shepherd. In Psalm 23 it was the Lord that is a shepherd to David. In this verse, it is David that is a shepherd to the people Israel. These two instances have nothing to do with each other besides the fact that the image of a shepherd is a very good one for expressing positive relationships.


It is interesting how many verses in scripture describe David or are about David.
Not surprising, since he was such a pivotal figure in Jewish history.

The psalm is a great insight into the love our Lord has for us.
That is true.

He is a good shepherd, he will not lose us.
That is also true, if we keep faith in him.
 
It is the same. The psalm and the verse from John give us a good understanding of who Jesus is and what he does. No they have the same purpose, to show we can trust Jesus.
That is true, it is about that, but the point is made metaphorical in one instance and the other is factual regarding the extent to which Christ has gone for us. The Psalm 23 does not say anything about Christ making a sacrifice for us, which is understandable since David, when he wrote this, was not describing New Testament chronology.
 
When you Catholics are praying this Psalm, you can just skip verse 6 because your confession is that it does not apply to you.

David had more hope than Roman Catholics.
David was expressing his feelings in the Psalm

That is NOT what he....and the Holy Spirit....said.

David said "Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Surely I will.


And this confuses Catholics into thinking David is instead committing the sin of presumption?

It's OK. You Catholics have to skip that line.
 
I have posted over and over, Scriptures from the very lips of our Lord, that says verbatim, that we are assured eternal life. But you have chosen to just gloss over those and not believe what Jesus did say. Salvation and eternal life was promised by God from the beginning. David like Abraham, believed God. That is why David was able to confidently say that that he would dwell in the house of the Lord forever.
 
That is NOT what he....and the Holy Spirit....said.

David said "Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Surely I will.
The Holy Spirit inspired David to have that feeling and write that Psalm. The Holy Spirit did not chose the exact words. That's not what "inspired Scripture" means. The psalms express feelings inspired by the Holy Spirit.
 
The Holy Spirit inspired David to have that feeling and write that Psalm. The Holy Spirit did not chose the exact words. That's not what "inspired Scripture" means. The psalms express feelings inspired by the Holy Spirit.
You as an RC would not understand what is meant in the psalms. This is because you don't which part of scripture is real.
 
That is NOT what he....and the Holy Spirit....said.

David said "Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Surely I will.
The Holy Spirit inspired David to have that feeling

He did not have a "feeling." He recorded a revelation of his future.

Only in Roman Catholicism does "Surely...I will" mean "Maybe....I might"

LOL!

You refuse to believe David. You refuse to believe the Holy Spirit. All you will believe is what you feel.

The Holy Spirit did not chose the exact words.

Your argument that the Holy Spirit inspired David to record a lie in God's Word is laughable. There is no depth of depravity devout Catholics will go to express their disdain and distrust of God's Word.
 
The entirety of the Word of God is revelation.
As most people know, "revelation" in a religious context means:

the divine or supernatural disclosure to humans of something relating to human existence or the world.

...which applies to some portions of Scripture, but certainly not to all. For example, the list of rulers of Israel in the book of Kings is knowledge that was passed down from person to person from observations that were originally made by a human. The thing they observed may have been a divine event, but the reporting of that event - the thing that is disclosed - is essentially just good journalism. In the case of Scripture, it is good journalism plus the guidance of the Holy Spirit so that we know that what is reported is trustworthy. This is very different from the book of Revelation, which is entirely a vision given to the author by God, which the author wrote down. The case in point is Psalms, which is simply inspirational songs by David or other psalmists in which they express their hopes, fears, loves, about the relationship between God and His people. It is not an exposition of doctrine. In most cases the psalms are prayers to God spoken in verse form. If David writes in the 23rd Psalm the "I shall surely live in the house of the Lord forever" he is expressing his own personal confidence that God will treat him like that. It is not God telling us that He will treat David that way, although we can infer from elsewhere in Scripture that it is very likely true. And the 23rd Psalm is certainly not telling anyone else that they will live in the house of the Lord forever. According to the text, the psalmist only says that about himself. For all these reasons, the 23rd Psalm does not guarantee that anyone today will live the house of the Lord forever with no conditions.
 
I constantly hear Catholics boast about how they pray the psalms.

Well I was reading probably the most well known Psalm the other day, and was reminded of yet another part of the Word that Roman Catholics have to reject.

David, in Psalm 23, declares confidently at the end:

Surely your goodness and love will follow me
all the days of my life,
and I will dwell in the house of the Lord

forever.

Right there, the Catholic has to stop and admit that this Scripture is not speaking about them....and thus they have to stop praying that Psalm at verse 5.

David says what no Roman Catholic can accept:

"Surely...I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever."

Even David knew he would have eternal life.
And John tells us that we can know we are saved. Catholics have to ignore a lot of Scripture to continue believing their sectarian leaders.
 
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