CDC, FDA faked covid test protocol using common cold

Bonnie

Super Member
My understanding is that they run the test about 40 cycles and in doing that, you would get a positive on just about anything, whcih was what happened when they tested orange peels, hair samples, etc.

They need to keep the fear factor in play.
You are right--except that the tests are run lower now, 30-33 cycles, the last I read, a couple of months ago, or maybe a little longer.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
My understanding is that they run the test about 40 cycles and in doing that, you would get a positive on just about anything, whcih was what happened when they tested orange peels, hair samples, etc.

They need to keep the fear factor in play.
correct. ...and they had nothing to calibrate the instrument with.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
You are right--except that the tests are run lower now, 30-33 cycles, the last I read, a couple of months ago, or maybe a little longer.
When they ere locking down the nation the test were run at such higher cycles.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
Sorry CrowCross, as it turns out the CDC isn't involved in calibration standards. Any requests for information* should have been directed to NIST.

Have you considered being a member of the Constitution Party instead?



* "To help meet the measurement and standards needs of U.S. industry and the nation, NIST provides calibrations, standard reference materials, standard reference data, test methods, proficiency evaluation materials [1], tools that facilitate the evaluation of measurement uncertainty [2], measurement quality assurance programs, and laboratory acceditation services that assist a customer in establishing traceability of measurement results."
I failed to see you point.

Sounds like the calibrations were not very good.
 

Deist

Active member
I failed to see you point.

Sounds like the calibrations were not very good.
My step sin is a lefty and got the vaccine about 2-3 months ago and as lefties do was hacking about me and my wife refusing to do so. He was sick two weeks ago and went to see the doctor and the Covid test was negative. Was sent home abd told to take a few aspirins and rest. He got worse and went back and tested again and the test showed he had Covid!!!
As for the test itself I was told it shouldn’t be run more than several times so 33 still seems excessive.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
My step sin is a lefty and got the vaccine about 2-3 months ago and as lefties do was hacking about me and my wife refusing to do so. He was sick two weeks ago and went to see the doctor and the Covid test was negative. Was sent home abd told to take a few aspirins and rest. He got worse and went back and tested again and the test showed he had Covid!!!
As for the test itself I was told it shouldn’t be run more than several times so 33 still seems excessive.
Yes, the PCR will see the portion of the genetic "sequence"....but Covid-19 isn't the only thing that has the genetic sequence. From the OP we learn that the genetic sequence isn't really what we think it is.
 

vibise

Well-known member
My step sin is a lefty and got the vaccine about 2-3 months ago and as lefties do was hacking about me and my wife refusing to do so. He was sick two weeks ago and went to see the doctor and the Covid test was negative. Was sent home abd told to take a few aspirins and rest. He got worse and went back and tested again and the test showed he had Covid!!!
As for the test itself I was told it shouldn’t be run more than several times so 33 still seems excessive.
The test is not run 33 times. PCR is a process that uses multiple temperature cycles to denature and renature DNA bonds. Short segments of DNA called primers are designed that flank the DNA segment of interest. They are allowed to bind to a sample DNA and then initiate copying of that segment through an added polymerase enzyme. Then the thermocycler machine alters temperature to denature these bonds so the process of copying can be reinitiated. This is done over and over to amplify the segment in question until it can be observed by gel electrophoresis and characterized by size and sequence. If there are too many cycles, then semi-related segments can be amplified, which should be avoided.
 

vibise

Well-known member
Yes, the PCR will see the portion of the genetic "sequence"....but Covid-19 isn't the only thing that has the genetic sequence. From the OP we learn that the genetic sequence isn't really what we think it is.
The shorter the DNA segment, the less unique it will be. A DNA of only 6 base pairs will be very common.
PCR relies on primers to initiate the process that are at least 18 bp and these are often quite specific*. The product of the PCR will be a much longer fragment that is several hundred to several thousand bp and is very specific.

*Mammalian genomes contain repetitive regions with shared DNA sequences, and families of genes with common motifs.
 

Deist

Active member
The test is not run 33 times. PCR is a process that uses multiple temperature cycles to denature and renature DNA bonds. Short segments of DNA called primers are designed that flank the DNA segment of interest. They are allowed to bind to a sample DNA and then initiate copying of that segment through an added polymerase enzyme. Then the thermocycler machine alters temperature to denature these bonds so the process of copying can be reinitiated. This is done over and over to amplify the segment in question until it can be observed by gel electrophoresis and characterized by size and sequence. If there are too many cycles, then semi-related segments can be amplified, which should be avoided.
 

inertia

Super Member
I failed to see you point.

Sounds like the calibrations were not very good.

The point:

During the initial outbreak, NIST developed synthetic fragments of SARS-CoV-2 RNA for manufacturers to effectively calibrate their instruments. As stated in your OP, the Thermo Fisher Scientific TaqPath™ 1-Step RT-qPCR Master Mix was employed. This instrument is directly traceable to NIST standards.

NIST - Watch this video to learn more.


 

CrowCross

Well-known member
The point:

During the initial outbreak, NIST developed synthetic fragments of SARS-CoV-2 RNA for manufacturers to effectively calibrate their instruments. As stated in your OP, the Thermo Fisher Scientific TaqPath™ 1-Step RT-qPCR Master Mix was employed. This instrument is directly traceable to NIST standards.

NIST - Watch this video to learn more.


Yes, synthetic fragments....a couple of man made snips out of 30,000 base pairs. Snips that are also represented in other viruses. That's the problem. They "effectively" calibrated their instruments to idenity other RNA to appear as Covid-19.
 

Fenuay

Well-known member
Yes, synthetic fragments....a couple of man made snips out of 30,000 base pairs. Snips that are also represented in other viruses. That's the problem. They "effectively" calibrated their instruments to idenity other RNA to appear as Covid-19.
Are you familiar with genetic cloning of viruses?
 
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