Did general Milley commit Treason or Mutiny and Sedition?

Mike McK

Well-known member

So, Is It Treason or Mutiny and Sedition?​

14 September 2021
KITDAFBS
I pose the question above in light of the reports that are circulating about the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley. A new book entitled “Peril”, by journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, details the behavior of Milley during the lame duck period of Donald Trump’s presidency.

It seems the general issued orders to slow walk any launch of nukes during that period. Milley ordered the officials in charge of the National Military Command Center not to take orders from anyone except him. “No matter what you are told, you do the procedure. You do the process. And I’m part of that procedure,” Milley ordered, according to the book. The general then moved around the room and received verbal confirmation from each person.

It gets worse if that’s possible. In a pair of secret phone calls with his chinese counterpart, Milley promised to warn the chinese of any imminent attack. “General Li, I want to assure you that the American government is stable and everything is going to be okay,” Milley said. “We are not going to attack or conduct any kinetic operations against you.”

“General Li, you and I have known each other for now five years,” Milley added. “If we’re going to attack, I’m going to call you ahead of time. It’s not going to be a surprise.”



Below you’ll find the definitions of Treason and mutiny or sedition as they appear in the US code.



So, which one is it? Treason or Mutiny or Sedition? Or is it all three?

It's not treason. Under the Constitution, treason only applies to aid and comfort to the enemy. While we're in a cold war with China, under the law, they're considered an adversary, not an enemy. The two sound similar, but they're very different things.

Under Article 94 of the UCMJ, he appears to have committed insubordination, at best, and a good case could be made that he committed sedition and mutiny.
 

Backup

Well-known member
It's not treason. Under the Constitution, treason only applies to aid and comfort to the enemy. While we're in a cold war with China, under the law, they're considered an adversary, not an enemy. The two sound similar, but they're very different things.

Under Article 94 of the UCMJ, he appears to have committed insubordination, at best, and a good case could be made that he committed sedition and mutiny.
Yes. I think a lot of the military actions under the Orange Weirdo amount to insubordination.

There needs to be a serious public discussion about this. Yes, the American military is under civilian control, and should be. The President is Comander-in-Chief. But, and it’s a big but, Trump was a baby-man, and a nutcase. He very well could have done something horrible for selfish reasons. This is not normal.

Civilian control of the military works with the idea that the electoral college was designed to stop someone like Trump from getting in office, not allow it.

Our checks and balances need to be recalibrated.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Yes. I think a lot of the military actions under the Orange Weirdo amount to insubordination.

There needs to be a serious public discussion about this. Yes, the American military is under civilian control, and should be. The President is Comander-in-Chief. But, and it’s a big but, Trump was a baby-man, and a nutcase. He very well could have done something horrible for selfish reasons. This is not normal.

Civilian control of the military works with the idea that the electoral college was designed to stop someone like Trump from getting in office, not allow it.

Our checks and balances need to be recalibrated.
I've said many times before this that we now need a constitutional amendment; one that further defines and limits the powers of the presidency.

I'm not contradicting anything you wrote, but instead, suggesting one method of recalibration.
 

Thistle

Well-known member
It's not treason. Under the Constitution, treason only applies to aid and comfort to the enemy. While we're in a cold war with China, under the law, they're considered an adversary, not an enemy. The two sound similar, but they're very different things.

Under Article 94 of the UCMJ, he appears to have committed insubordination, at best, and a good case could be made that he committed sedition and mutiny.
I understand how you get there, but I'd like to see a military tribunal take up the question, and consider whether the modern fifth generation warfare qualifies as a state of war given this is a new era of warfare. Either way it's extremely serious.
 
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