Do phrases like white fragility, white supremacy, white privilege, white washing and white lash come from critical race theory directly or indir...

Do phrases like white fragility, white supremacy, white privilege, white washing and white lash come from critical race theory directly or indirectly, or where do they come from?
 
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Ficciones

Active member
Frankly, John James, I'm pretty tired of this culture wars nonsense where conservative snowflakes get triggered about phrases more than the horrible material conditions many people are forced to live in.
 

Harry Leggs

Active member
Frankly, John James, I'm pretty tired of this culture wars nonsense where conservative snowflakes get triggered about phrases more than the horrible material conditions many people are forced to live in.
How are they forced? For the most part we put ourselves in the circumstances we are in and that is for good or bad. Nobody is forcing anybody. Besides most of your crime-ridden slums are in Dem run hellholes like Chicago.

Kids graduate with 4th-grade reading level and for the most part, they are to blame because they do not study.

All they really have to do to make it to the middle class is graduate from High school and not get pregnant before marriage. Mostly applies to everybody regardless of skin color. There are plenty of ways out of poverty so don't lie about being forced anywhere.
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Do phrases like white fragility, white supremacy, white privilege, white washing and white lash come for critical race theory directly or indirectly, or where do they come from?
They come from observations of the reality of life for everybody else.
The use of euphemisms like "property values" and "crime" to defend the exclusion negros from certain neighborhoods in america, is a fact of life.
Redlining communities to keep negros from owning homes or businesses, is a fact of life.
Gerrymandering to devalue nergro votes, is a fact of life.
And when negros try to change or challenge the status-quo, violent reaction from frightened white folks is another fact of life.

The erasure of African history is also fact of life.
 

Temujin

Well-known member
Do phrases like white fragility, white supremacy, white privilege, white washing and white lash come from critical race theory directly or indirectly, or where do they come from?
The phrase used in the UK is institutionalised racism. It was coined by a judge who conducted a public enquiry into the investigation of a racist killing in London. The enquiry found that all arms of government, including the judiciary, the police the armed forces, etc, discriminated directly or indirectly on racial grounds. A massive effort was put into training public employees and there have been several changes in the law. There are still elements of built in racism and racists still exist, but nothing remotely like the racism that dominates American society.

Call it what you will, just don't think for a moment that it doesn't exist, that it doesn't matter or that your society is not worse for it being there.
 

Ficciones

Active member
Kids graduate with 4th-grade reading level and for the most part, they are to blame because they do not study.

Despite the rhetoric of American equality, the school experiences of African-American and other “minority” students in the United States continue to be substantially separate and unequal. Few Americans realize that the U.S. educational system is one of the most unequal in the industrialized world, and that students routinely receive dramatically different learning opportunities based on their social status. In contrast to European and Asian nations that fund schools centrally and equally, the wealthiest 10% of school districts in the United States spend nearly 10 times more than the poorest 10%, and spending ratios of 3 to 1 are common within states. Poor and minority students are concentrated in the least well-funded schools, most of which are located in central cities or rural areas and funded at levels substantially below those of neighboring suburban districts. Recent analyses of data prepared for school finance cases in Alabama, New Jersey, New York, Louisiana, and Texas have found that on every tangible measure—from qualified teachers to curriculum offerings—schools serving greater numbers of students of color had significantly fewer resources than schools serving mostly white students.

 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Do phrases like white fragility, white supremacy, white privilege, white washing and white lash come from critical race theory directly or indirectly, or where do they come from?
They come from observation of American society over the last four centuries.

Whether the labels are applied correctly or not, they represent real trends/practices/phenomena in American culture. This is an inescapable fact, and trying to relegate them to some partisan strategy is a strategy born of racism itself.
 

Gus Bovona

Active member
. . . . For the most part we put ourselves in the circumstances we are in and that is for good or bad. . . .
Of course, one's circumstances are always a mixture of things within your control and things outside of your control. But, even the things within your control are ultimately less in your control than they seem. I was not in control of putting myself in the circumstance of having parents who valued education and had good jobs, nor of having good schools to go to, nor of having my peers be in the same situation so my peers reinforced those values.
 

Harry Leggs

Active member
Despite the rhetoric of American equality, the school experiences of African-American and other “minority” students in the United States continue to be substantially separate and unequal. Few Americans realize that the U.S. educational system is one of the most unequal in the industrialized world, and that students routinely receive dramatically different learning opportunities based on their social status. In contrast to European and Asian nations that fund schools centrally and equally, the wealthiest 10% of school districts in the United States spend nearly 10 times more than the poorest 10%, and spending ratios of 3 to 1 are common within states. Poor and minority students are concentrated in the least well-funded schools, most of which are located in central cities or rural areas and funded at levels substantially below those of neighboring suburban districts. Recent analyses of data prepared for school finance cases in Alabama, New Jersey, New York, Louisiana, and Texas have found that on every tangible measure—from qualified teachers to curriculum offerings—schools serving greater numbers of students of color had significantly fewer resources than schools serving mostly white students.

All anyone has to do is study and not make excuses for failure. It means parent involvement with the teachers and kids doing their work and behaving. The more they are in school, the more they study, the more they learn, the more they learn the better they advance.

Separate and unequal does not apply to blacks, who for the most part, excel in sports in public education. If they can do the latter then by the same standard they can do the former.

Almost every professional athlete got their start in public education. That also includes college grads. It is public education.

So take your talking points down the road. They can learn if they study. If they do not study, do not attend, and screw off then they do not make the A-team. It is that simple.
 

Harry Leggs

Active member
Of course, one's circumstances are always a mixture of things within your control and things outside of your control. But, even the things within your control are ultimately less in your control than they seem. I was not in control of putting myself in the circumstance of having parents who valued education and had good jobs, nor of having good schools to go to, nor of having my peers be in the same situation so my peers reinforced those values.
All schools are good if the student studies, behave, and does what the teacher tells them.
 

Gus Bovona

Active member
All schools are good if the student studies, behave, and does what the teacher tells them.
My larger point still holds: there a plenty of things in one's circumstances that can be very difficult to rise above, although some can. Just because some can doesn't mean everyone can.

Unless you're going to claim that we're in complete control of everything significant in our lives, this is just a glass-half-full, half-empty conversation.
 

Harry Leggs

Active member
My larger point still holds:
Then why do blacks excel in sports if they are disadvantaged?
there a plenty of things in one's circumstances that can be very difficult to rise above
So? If i wanted to make the A-team in football competing against mostly blacks then there would be plenty of difficulties to overcome.

Unless you're going to claim that we're in complete control of everything significant in our lives, this is just a glass-half-full, half-empty conversation.
You have not made your point and you aren't going to by ignoring counter-arguments. If they want to excel in math then they are going to have to study. There is no easy way. Public School educators are among the most top-trained in the country for K-12. These are facts. You have no point and seem unable to make a rationed case. You just totally blow off everything i wrote. For the most part, their life is in their hands. It is up to them.

Stay away from drugs alcohol and be law-abiding. Don't be a bully and do what the teacher says. Study your behind off and don't make excuses for failure. This will all bounce off your head.
 

Ficciones

Active member
All schools are good if the student studies, behave, and does what the teacher tells them.
I'm sorry, the fact is, this is simply wrong. Schools vary widely in quality for reasons having nothing to do with the behavior of individual students. A poorly funded overcrowded high school with 50 students per class is simply not going to provide the same quality of education as one with 15 to 20 students per class - to say nothing of funding for labs, textbooks, libraries, phys ed facilities, and basic building maintenance.
 

Harry Leggs

Active member
I'm sorry, the fact is, this is simply wrong.
Really? Why do blacks excel in sports if disadvantaged and do not have top-line equipment?
Schools vary widely in quality for reasons having nothing to do with the behavior of individual students.
It has everything to do with behavior. The more behaved the class the less time class time is wasted on dealing with behavior problems. Learning stops for everybody every time a student goes off.
A poorly funded overcrowded high school with 50 students per class is simply not going to provide the same quality of education as one with 15 to 20 students per class - to say nothing of funding for labs, textbooks, libraries, phys ed facilities, and basic building maintenance.
Public school classrooms with 50 students is ripe for lawsuits. There is Office of Civil Rights, EEOC and Dept of Labor to name a few and these can be federal or state-level agencies. So i am not buying that. As is they are suing schools in Ca. on account of lockdowns and kids not being in schools to learn. They are failing.

Schools do not welcome lawsuits and all anyone has to do is demand smaller class sizes or risk civil rights complaints with federal agencies and if that does not resolve they can go to private attorneys and sue the school. They can even refer admins for federal prosecution for civil rights violations. At the least, they can lose their 6 figure jobs. It is easy money for lawyers.
 

Gus Bovona

Active member
Then why do blacks excel in sports if they are disadvantaged?
They're not disadvantaged in terms of sports.
You have not made your point and you aren't going to by ignoring counter-arguments. If they want to excel in math then they are going to have to study. There is no easy way.
Take student A, who is in a good school, and student B who is in a bad school. Who will do better, and why? Do you think both A and B will have the same educational results? If so, then it doesn't matter whether one is in a bad school or a good school. But, in that case, why study math or other subjects at all? If all that matters is one's personal effort, just give 'em the textbook and if they have questions they can call someone trained in math on the phone?

Or, maybe, the quality of a school does matter?
Public School educators are among the most top-trained in the country for K-12.
I don't know what this sentence means. Are you saying all public school teachers are above average?
These are facts. You have no point and seem unable to make a rationed case. You just totally blow off everything i wrote. For the most part, their life is in their hands. It is up to them.
I'm not disagreeing that one's life is in one's hand, to some extent. I'm willing to acknowledge that the glass is somewhere around half-empty/full, and that includes your side of the issue. You seem to not acknowledge that, though.
Stay away from drugs alcohol and be law-abiding.
Sound advice.
Don't be a bully and do what the teacher says.
Excellent.
Study your behind off and don't make excuses for failure.
More good advice. If only everyone had parents, peers, and a community that reinforced good lessons. But not everyone has that, through no fault of their own. And the people who do get up when they fail, don't make excuses, and try again, to eventually succeed, do so not only because of their internal fortitude, but because that internal fortitude has been strengthened and reinforced by the parents, peers, and community that they were lucky enough to have, through no effort of their own.
 

Temujin

Well-known member
They're not disadvantaged in terms of sports.

Take student A, who is in a good school, and student B who is in a bad school. Who will do better, and why? Do you think both A and B will have the same educational results? If so, then it doesn't matter whether one is in a bad school or a good school. But, in that case, why study math or other subjects at all? If all that matters is one's personal effort, just give 'em the textbook and if they have questions they can call someone trained in math on the phone?

Or, maybe, the quality of a school does matter?

I don't know what this sentence means. Are you saying all public school teachers are above average?

I'm not disagreeing that one's life is in one's hand, to some extent. I'm willing to acknowledge that the glass is somewhere around half-empty/full, and that includes your side of the issue. You seem to not acknowledge that, though.

Sound advice.

Excellent.

More good advice. If only everyone had parents, peers, and a community that reinforced good lessons. But not everyone has that, through no fault of their own. And the people who do get up when they fail, don't make excuses, and try again, to eventually succeed, do so not only because of their internal fortitude, but because that internal fortitude has been strengthened and reinforced by the parents, peers, and community that they were lucky enough to have, through no effort of their own.
Also, not every child needs extra lessons in how to talk to police officers without being shot.
 

Harry Leggs

Active member
Also, not every child needs extra lessons in how to talk to police officers without being shot.
What are the odds of being shot by a cop as opposed to being shot by another black. Keep looking for that boogieman under the bed. Take a reality break.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Then why do blacks excel in sports if they are disadvantaged?
This question is so stupid, it doesn't even rise to the level of "ignorant"...

Ignoring the simple fact that not all "blacks" excel at sports, there are many reasons for a culture being good or bad at something. Poverty can result in a country excelling at soccer, for example, because it's a simple sport that can be played almost anywhere and with a minimum amount of equipment/gear required. Soccer is massively-popular worldwide for many reasons, but the fact that it levels the economic playing field is definitely one of them.

Tell me: do blacks "excel" at hockey"?

Why not?
 

Temujin

Well-known member
What are the odds of being shot by a cop as opposed to being shot by another black. Keep looking for that boogieman under the bed. Take a reality break.
What has that got to do with anything? If, and I mean if, blacks are an underclass subject to racist policing including violence, then the likelihood of them adopting violence as a route out of their situation is greater than that of whites. To test this theory, remove racism in the police. Stating in effect that these uppity black people only understand violence is in itself racist.
 
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