Does the Pope have earthly authority to order death for anyone breaking church law ???

SDAchristian

Well-known member
The Roman Catholic Church states that Pope Leo I (440-461) was the first pope who claimed universal authority, and although not everyone accepted the idea at the time, it steadily grew until in 1075 Pope Gregory could declare that all Christians were obligated to obey him and that those who did not could be eternally damned. The RC pope even reserved to himself the right to punish and depose monarchs who disagreed with him.

The RCC says that undoubtedly, the most important man in medieval Europe was the pope. As a secular ruler he had direct authority over much of Italy; as Supreme Pontiff he used the threat of interdict and excommunication to bring recalcitrant monarchs into line. It is true that some of the medieval popes used this power to further their own personal goals and that there were abuses of the sacred office. Also, the medieval mentality and moral climates were somewhat different from ours today and that many people were not much disturbed by a pope who was a military leader or even by one who had a mistress and illegitimate children.
AV Ac 17:31 Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by [that] man whom he hath ordained; [whereof] he hath given assurance unto all [men], in that he hath raised him from the dead.

I find it hypocritical to claim Jesus' authority, but not following in Jesus' example in righteousness.

Yours in Christ, Michael
 

SDAchristian

Well-known member
Prologue: We are discussing universal papal impeccability, for others to read.
The Roman Catholic Church states that Pope Leo I (440-461) was the first pope who claimed universal authority, and although not everyone accepted the idea at the time, it steadily grew until in 1075 Pope Gregory could declare that all Christians were obligated to obey him and that those who did not could be eternally damned. The RC pope even reserved to himself the right to punish and depose monarchs who disagreed with him.

The RCC says that undoubtedly, the most important man in medieval Europe was the pope. As a secular ruler he had direct authority over much of Italy; as Supreme Pontiff he used the threat of interdict and excommunication to bring recalcitrant monarchs into line. It is true that some of the medieval popes used this power to further their own personal goals and that there were abuses of the sacred office. Also, the medieval mentality and moral climates were somewhat different from ours today and that many people were not much disturbed by a pope who was a military leader or even by one who had a mistress and illegitimate children.
Thank you for this background perspective on the RCC and it's Popes.
Impeccability is the absence of sin. Christianity teaches this to be an attribute of God (logically God cannot sin, it would mean that he would act against his own will and nature) and therefore it is also attributed to Christ.
AV Ro 7:23-25 But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members. 24 O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? 25 I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin.

Then is the RCC really a Christian universal church for being above "the law of sin" ???

Yours in Christ, Michael
 
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