Ecumenical Guidelines of the Roman Catholic Church

RayneBeau

Well-known member
The Holy Office of the RCC issued its teachings on ecumenism in 1949, and they were based on an encyclical issued by Pope Pius XI. this publication laid down canonically sanctioned principles for union with any Protestant denomination:
1. Nothing can be added or subtracted from the fullness of Catholic doctrine. Protestantism has nothing to add to the revealed truth of the Roman Catholic religion.
2. Christian unity must not be pursued for the sake of assimilation (i.e., the incorporation of Protestant beliefs and practices into the life of the Church, and Catholic doctrine must never be adjusted to comply with Protestant sensibilities).
3. True unity between Christians can only come about by the return of Protestants to the Catholic fold.

Do Roman Catholics still obey their church and follow these principles they have set forth?
 

Nondenom40

Active member
The Holy Office of the RCC issued its teachings on ecumenism in 1949, and they were based on an encyclical issued by Pope Pius XI. this publication laid down canonically sanctioned principles for union with any Protestant denomination:
1. Nothing can be added or subtracted from the fullness of Catholic doctrine. Protestantism has nothing to add to the revealed truth of the Roman Catholic religion.
2. Christian unity must not be pursued for the sake of assimilation (i.e., the incorporation of Protestant beliefs and practices into the life of the Church, and Catholic doctrine must never be adjusted to comply with Protestant sensibilities).
3. True unity between Christians can only come about by the return of Protestants to the Catholic fold.

Do Roman Catholics still obey their church and follow these principles they have set forth?
The word play I see all the time is prot vs catholic. I'm not an advocate for protestantism. I want people to know Jesus as their savior and be in heaven. Since protestantism encompasses non Christian religions I'd never promote it. Catholicism doesn't have the gospel so pitting one against the other is meaningless. True believers are born again. And the catholic version of unity is everyone else crawling in their knees to them. They won't compromise. Well, let's wait and see what francis says next🤣
 

balshan

Well-known member
The Holy Office of the RCC issued its teachings on ecumenism in 1949, and they were based on an encyclical issued by Pope Pius XI. this publication laid down canonically sanctioned principles for union with any Protestant denomination:
1. Nothing can be added or subtracted from the fullness of Catholic doctrine. Protestantism has nothing to add to the revealed truth of the Roman Catholic religion.
2. Christian unity must not be pursued for the sake of assimilation (i.e., the incorporation of Protestant beliefs and practices into the life of the Church, and Catholic doctrine must never be adjusted to comply with Protestant sensibilities).
3. True unity between Christians can only come about by the return of Protestants to the Catholic fold.

Do Roman Catholics still obey their church and follow these principles they have set forth?
Remember the days when the RCC was just honest about the fact that Heaven was only for RCs. The devil did not have to work on others outside the faith because they were already going to hell. He was busy trying to get RCs into hell by taking them away from the RCC.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Remember the days when the RCC was just honest about the fact that Heaven was only for RCs. The devil did not have to work on others outside the faith because they were already going to hell. He was busy trying to get RCs into hell by taking them away from the RCC.
Oh yes, how well I remember . . . . .

And remember when converts to Roman Catholicism were required to manifest "supernatural sorrow for their past sins" - I never did know what a "supernatural sorrow for sins" really was, or how it was presented to the 'Church' by a convert.
 

balshan

Well-known member
Oh yes, how well I remember . . . . .

And remember when converts to Roman Catholicism were required to manifest "supernatural sorrow for their past sins" - I never did know what a "supernatural sorrow for sins" really was, or how it was presented to the 'Church' by a convert.
I must admit I had forgotten about it but here is a reference:

Remember to confess your sins with supernatural sorrow for your sins and with a firm purpose of amendment. Ask your confessor to help you with any difficulties you have in making a good confession.

Now as you know I have pointed to the fact that McArdle said in his statement he made 1500 confessions and that he felt it was like a magic wand had been waved. Is that supernatural sorrow? Well it didn't work abused children over and over again.
 

Nondenom40

Active member
I must admit I had forgotten about it but here is a reference:

Remember to confess your sins with supernatural sorrow for your sins and with a firm purpose of amendment. Ask your confessor to help you with any difficulties you have in making a good confession.

Now as you know I have pointed to the fact that McArdle said in his statement he made 1500 confessions and that he felt it was like a magic wand had been waved. Is that supernatural sorrow? Well it didn't work abused children over and over again.
Supernatural sorrow? Theres one more thing in approx 14/15 years here at carm i've never heard. Wow! With all the supposed grace and supernatural sorrow floating around in the rcc they should all have halos around their heads. Wonder if thats a gift in one of the gift lists; Faith, healing, supernatural sorrow?? Maybe Paul laid into Peter in Antioch with supernatural sorrow? Smh. The language is ridiculous. As it all is in that religion.
 

balshan

Well-known member
Supernatural sorrow? Theres one more thing in approx 14/15 years here at carm i've never heard. Wow! With all the supposed grace and supernatural sorrow floating around in the rcc they should all have halos around their heads. Wonder if thats a gift in one of the gift lists; Faith, healing, supernatural sorrow?? Maybe Paul laid into Peter in Antioch with supernatural sorrow? Smh. The language is ridiculous. As it all is in that religion.
We are always learning.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Supernatural sorrow? Theres one more thing in approx 14/15 years here at carm i've never heard. Wow! With all the supposed grace and supernatural sorrow floating around in the rcc they should all have halos around their heads. Wonder if thats a gift in one of the gift lists; Faith, healing, supernatural sorrow?? Maybe Paul laid into Peter in Antioch with supernatural sorrow? Smh. The language is ridiculous. As it all is in that religion.
Here's another one you've probably heard before when it came to the education of the wannabe 'converts.' Before they were baptized into the "divine Church"(gag).... the new converts also had to proclaim a "firm belief in all the teachings of Christ as handed down by the one divine Church.
 

jonathan_hili

Well-known member
The Holy Office of the RCC issued its teachings on ecumenism in 1949, and they were based on an encyclical issued by Pope Pius XI. this publication laid down canonically sanctioned principles for union with any Protestant denomination:
1. Nothing can be added or subtracted from the fullness of Catholic doctrine. Protestantism has nothing to add to the revealed truth of the Roman Catholic religion.
2. Christian unity must not be pursued for the sake of assimilation (i.e., the incorporation of Protestant beliefs and practices into the life of the Church, and Catholic doctrine must never be adjusted to comply with Protestant sensibilities).
3. True unity between Christians can only come about by the return of Protestants to the Catholic fold.

Do Roman Catholics still obey their church and follow these principles they have set forth?
I think the guidelines and approaches have been changed since the 1940s. For instance, the attitude towards point 1 has definitely been mitigated and many Catholic theologians and Churchmen now consider Protestant contributions could be of value to understanding and living the faith. (For instance, in Lumen gentium: "Nevertheless, many elements of sanctification and truth are found outside its visible confines. Since these are gifts belonging to the Church of Christ, they are forces impelling towards Catholic unity.") I think number 2 still stands. As for number 3, well Vatican 2 affirmed (also in Lumen gentium) that the broad Christian Church subsists in the Catholic Church (rather than being identical with it).

I think, especially in the West, as secularism spreads and Catholics, Orthodox and Protestants are forced to work closer to one another, some of these tensions can be lessened, with greater dialogue and a move towards ecumenism. The Joint Declaration between Catholics and Lutherans a few decades ago is an example of this might happen: still acknowledging differences but also noting similarities and speaking more openly together.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
I think the guidelines and approaches have been changed since the 1940s. For instance, the attitude towards point 1 has definitely been mitigated and many Catholic theologians and Churchmen now consider Protestant contributions could be of value to understanding and living the faith. (For instance, in Lumen gentium: "Nevertheless, many elements of sanctification and truth are found outside its visible confines. Since these are gifts belonging to the Church of Christ, they are forces impelling towards Catholic unity.") I think number 2 still stands. As for number 3, well Vatican 2 affirmed (also in Lumen gentium) that the broad Christian Church subsists in the Catholic Church (rather than being identical with it).

I think, especially in the West, as secularism spreads and Catholics, Orthodox and Protestants are forced to work closer to one another, some of these tensions can be lessened, with greater dialogue and a move towards ecumenism. The Joint Declaration between Catholics and Lutherans a few decades ago is an example of this might happen: still acknowledging differences but also noting similarities and speaking more openly together.
Before jumping into the Tiber, do Roman Catholic wanabees still have to study an approved Roman Catholic catechism "under the guidance of a Roman Catholic priest?"
 

jonathan_hili

Well-known member
Before jumping into the Tiber, do Roman Catholic wanabees still have to study an approved Roman Catholic catechism "under the guidance of a Roman Catholic priest?"
There are courses (e.g. RCIA) that are studied at the local parish usually, and these are often headed or overseen by the parish priest. They do go through the catechism during the courses (though obviously not exhaustively).
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Even in the late 50's before becoming a full-fledged Roman Catholic, the convert wannabes MUST swear to the following oath: "With a sincere heart and with unfeigned faith, I detest and adjure every error, every heresy, and every sect, opposed to the said Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Roman Church. So help me God."

Is that oath still in place, and used today before new, indoctrinated, soon-to-be Roman Catholic converts can officially become an RCC member, having yet to receive that spuriously proclaimed 'indelible mark' of a Roman Catholic on their eternal souls? And if not, why not?
 

jonathan_hili

Well-known member
Even in the late 50's before becoming a full-fledged Roman Catholic, the convert wannabes MUST swear to the following oath: "With a sincere heart and with unfeigned faith, I detest and adjure every error, every heresy, and every sect, opposed to the said Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Roman Church. So help me God."

Is that oath still in place, and used today before new, indoctrinated, soon-to-be Roman Catholic converts can officially become an RCC member, having yet to receive that spuriously proclaimed 'indelible mark' of a Roman Catholic on their eternal souls? And if not, why not?
Where does that oath come from? I tried looking it up but couldn't find it. It sounds like a statement Galileo made when recanting.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Where does that oath come from? I tried looking it up but couldn't find it. It sounds like a statement Galileo made when recanting.
Roman Catholic Rev. Bertrand L. Conway. The Question-Box Answers: Replies to Questions Received on Missions to Non-Catholics. With a Preface by Roman Catholic Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop of Baltimore.

  • Published by The Catholic Truth Society of San Francisco. It received the Imprimatur (official seal of endorsement) of Patrick Cardinal Hayes, Archbishop of New York.
  • The Campbell-Purcell Debate (1837) : Christian Courier

    Bertrand Conway, a leading apologist for Catholicism, acknowledged that clerical celibacy has its roots in neither natural nor divine law (p. 311). The truth is, the practice of celibate orders is the result of an ancient attempt to model Christianity after certain aspects of paganism.
 
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The Holy Office of the RCC issued its teachings on ecumenism in 1949, and they were based on an encyclical issued by Pope Pius XI. this publication laid down canonically sanctioned principles for union with any Protestant denomination:
1. Nothing can be added or subtracted from the fullness of Catholic doctrine. Protestantism has nothing to add to the revealed truth of the Roman Catholic religion.
2. Christian unity must not be pursued for the sake of assimilation (i.e., the incorporation of Protestant beliefs and practices into the life of the Church, and Catholic doctrine must never be adjusted to comply with Protestant sensibilities).
3. True unity between Christians can only come about by the return of Protestants to the Catholic fold.

Do Roman Catholics still obey their church and follow these principles they have set forth?
These doctrines were totally contradicted by the heresies of Vatican II. Catholics today need to read https://www.papalencyclicals.net/pius11/p11morta.htm Mortalium Animos by Pope Pius XI for the true teaching of the Catholic Church on inter-religious dialogue and false ecumenism.
 

Septextura

Active member

Those lacking discernment may fall for the softball counter-reformation, but they can't fool the elect of God.
 

Those lacking discernment may fall for the softball counter-reformation, but they can't fool the elect of God.
Vatican II decreed and implemented teachings previously condemned by the Infallible Teaching Magisterium of the Church. The Second Vatican Council’s heretical teachings were primarily, but not exclusively, in the areas of religious liberty and false ecumenism.

Protestantism is a collection of contradicting sects founded by men, centuries after the Catholic Church. There is no unity of doctrine, worship or disciplines in Protestantism.

Luther did not think through his novel new doctrine of the right of individual interpretation of scriptures. If HE had the right to interpret sacred scripture for himself, that meant that everyone else had that same right. The splintering of Protestantism because of this heresy began even during his lifetime and continues, unabated, today.
 

mica

Well-known member
Vatican II decreed and implemented teachings previously condemned by the Infallible Teaching Magisterium of the Church. The Second Vatican Council’s heretical teachings were primarily, but not exclusively, in the areas of religious liberty and false ecumenism.
so much for the infallibility of the RCC 'teaching magisterium'.

Protestantism is a collection of contradicting sects founded by men, centuries after the Catholic Church. There is no unity of doctrine, worship or disciplines in Protestantism.

Luther did not think through his novel new doctrine of the right of individual interpretation of scriptures. If HE had the right to interpret sacred scripture for himself, that meant that everyone else had that same right. The splintering of Protestantism because of this heresy began even during his lifetime and continues, unabated, today.
catholicism is part of that. the RCC / CC was founded by men and what it teaches contradicts scripture.

and the RCC was irate that he read and studied scripture for himself and exposed that the RCC wasn't teaching the truth found in scripture.

so much for the Bereans reading and studying scripture and comparing it to what Paul taught!
 

jonathan_hili

Well-known member
Roman Catholic Rev. Bertrand L. Conway. The Question-Box Answers: Replies to Questions Received on Missions to Non-Catholics. With a Preface by Roman Catholic Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop of Baltimore.

  • Published by The Catholic Truth Society of San Francisco. It received the Imprimatur (official seal of endorsement) of Patrick Cardinal Hayes, Archbishop of New York.
  • The Campbell-Purcell Debate (1837) : Christian Courier

    Bertrand Conway, a leading apologist for Catholicism, acknowledged that clerical celibacy has its roots in neither natural nor divine law (p. 311). The truth is, the practice of celibate orders is the result of an ancient attempt to model Christianity after certain aspects of paganism.
Thanks, I found it on p. 99:

" With a sincere heart, therefore, and with unfeigned faith, I detest and abjure every error, heresy, and sect, opposed to the said Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Roman Church. So help me God, and these His holy Gospels, which I touch with my hand."
 
Where does that oath come from? I tried looking it up but couldn't find it. It sounds like a statement Galileo made when recanting.
Before Vatican II, a Catholic convert coming from a schismatic or heretic sect was required to make an act of abjuration of the errors and heresies which they formerly held prior to their baptism, or, in the case of Eastern schismatics, before they make their profession of Faith and can receive Catholic sacraments.

This is contained explicitly in the Profession of Faith of the Council of Trent: "Also all other things taught, defined, and declared by the sacred canons and ecumenical Councils, and especially by the sacred and holy Synod of Trent, (and by the ecumenical Council of the Vatican,1 particularly concerning the primacy of the Roman Pontiff and his infallible teaching), I without hesitation accept and profess; and at the same time all things contrary thereto, and whatever heresies have been condemned, and rejected, and anathematized by the Church, I likewise condemn, reject, and anathematize."

The Vatican II Novus Ordo sect, which believes all religions have value in the order of salvation, has, of course, rejected this requirement of abjuration of error and heresies.
 
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