Gal. 1:1, nouns in simple apposition

The Real John Milton

Well-known member
Παῦλος ἀπόστολος, οὐκ ἀπ’ ἀνθρώπων οὐδὲ δι’ ἀνθρώπου ἀλλὰ διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ καὶ Θεοῦ Πατρὸς τοῦ ἐγείραντος αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν,

Notice the two sets of nouns in simple apposition, the first set in black and the second in red. Παῦλος, the first noun of the first set is unquestionably a proper name, and the second noun of the first set ,ἀπόστολος, is a title which is the functional equivalent of a proper name because it can only refer to Παῦλος. The apostle's M.O. with such appositional phrases seems to be to put the proper name first. Thus looking at the second appositional phrase ( Θεοῦ Πατρὸς) it is obvious that Θεός is seen by the apostle as a proper name of the Father also. Regardless, if it is not admitted that it is a proper name, it must be seen at least as the functional equivalent of it.
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
I don't think that logically follows.... more than one person can have the exact same name.
 

cjab

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I don't think that logically follows.... more than one person can have the exact same name.
Not in theology, because it repudiates all that having a "name" implies. A name infers a distinguishable name, otherwise it is no longer a name in its proper sense, but a class. A class of deities infers either polytheism, or Sabellianism if the members of the class are indistinguishable. To be distinguishable, at least one attribute must be different among the class members. But it seems there is no ability of many Trinitarians to distinguish the members of the Trinity, just because they are defined as having all attributes in common, leaving many Trinitarians open to the charge of teaching and practising Sabellianism.

NB: "Jesus" doesn't transliterate to YHWH but to Yehoshua or Yeshua (YHWH saves). He showed that the name of the Father is YHWH, in the Lord's prayer, and that it remains as a denotation of the Father.
 
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cjab

Well-known member
I don't think you get it.
I think Sabellianism masquerades itself as Trinitarianism today. Attributing Jesus and his Father with the same name suffices to prove the contention.

In the bible"God" always denotes just one person denoted by singular personal pronouns (cf. Heb 1:1,2 etc).
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
Singular pronouns can denote more than one person.

The whole nation of Israel was called Jacob, for example, with singular pronouns.

That's just a grammatical rule you can't somehow pretend isn't there.
 

cjab

Well-known member
Never heard of the nation of God (in heaven) but I did hear of a "pantheon:" all the gods of a people or religion collectively.

The Marcionite system had two Gods: a creator god who demanded and ruthlessly exacted justice that created the material world of which humanity, body and soul, was a part—and Jesus Christ, the embodiment of the New Testament God, who provided redemption.
 
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