God promised to preserve His words believers believed they have it

Leatherneck0311

Well-known member
Which one? MT or Tr?
Neither, the W/H Greek was and is used in MV’s. NIce try though. Are you a free mason or a RC ? You do know W/H started the Ghostly Guild and believed they could communicate with the dead right ? Doesn’t God forbid communicating with the dead ? That is who folks trust when they study MV’s men who ignored God.
 
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logos1560

Well-known member
Those who trust and believe God are never in a bad way, conversely those who pick and chose what they will and will not believe have to play a continual guessing game. Your loss not mine.

You fail to demonstrate from the Scriptures that believing assertions concerning the KJV that are not true is believing God. God does not lead believers to deceive themselves by believing claims for the KJV that are not true.
 

J316

Member
And notice they never go into detail of why the texts are "corrupt" They start with the assumption the KJV is perfect and examine the evidence in the light of their predetermined outvome.
The Bible-Correcting-Crowd start with the assumption that ALL Bible translations have errors and examine the evidence in the light of their predetermined outcome. What a great contrast! Self inflicted injury, exposing their own position.
Your scholars approach the Bible as a dead book/letter. As you mimic them, ever asked what is their predetermined outcome?
 

logos1560

Well-known member
The Bible-Correcting-Crowd start with the assumption that ALL Bible translations have errors and examine the evidence in the light of their predetermined outcome.
The Church of England makers of the KJV started with the assumption that no Bible translation would be perfect or that all Bible translations have imperfections or blemishes so are you suggesting that you blindly trust part of your so-called "Bible-correcting crowd?" according to a consistent application of your very own assertion?

Your own words condemn your inconsistency and hypocrisy as you blindly accept the work of Bible-correctors who changed and revised the pre-1611 word of God translated into English. Is that a self-inflicted injury of your part, exposing your own inconsistent human reasoning?
 

glenlogie

Well-known member
The Bible-Correcting-Crowd start with the assumption that ALL Bible translations have errors and examine the evidence in the light of their predetermined outcome. What a great contrast! Self inflicted injury, exposing their own position.
Your scholars approach the Bible as a dead book/letter. As you mimic them, ever asked what is their predetermined outcome?
Another response with zero verses cited that state the KJV is perfect
 

John t

Super Member
From one cult to the KJVO cult.

James 1:
5 Now if any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask for it from God, who gives to all without reservation and not reproaching, and it will be given to him. 6 But let him ask for it in faith, without any doubting, for the one who doubts is like the surf of the sea, driven by the wind and tossed about. 7 For that person must not suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; 8 he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways.
 

glenlogie

Well-known member
I wonder how you believe you can come to know the truth by believing that all Bible translations have errors. Show me any Bible translation you believe is without errors and I will demonstrate what you want from it. I can't do this from the very one you believe to have errors. You are the one holding yourself, the burden is on you.

Who are the believers? Are you talking about the "believers" that believe that all Bible translations have errors or the believers that said not all of them have errors. Talking about deception, does ERROR not deceive those that believe in it?
And still zero scripture stating the KJV is a perfect translation
 

Beloved Daughter

Super Member
Whose Greek texts ? Westcott and Hort who were cultist and closet RC’s ? Their text is based mainly on Codex Vaticanus.
You really should check the facts before you accuse someone of being a cultist. You should also know what Riplinger said about Westcott. A blatant lie.

Here is the KJVO lie, corrected by the Westcott and Hort Resource Centre.


Quote #2: "After leaving the monastery, we shaped our course to a little oratory which we discovered on the summit of a neighbouring hill. . . . Fortunately we found the door open. It is very small, with one kneeling place; and behind a screen was a ‘Pieta’ the size of life [i.e. a Virgin and dead Christ]. . . . Had I been alone I could have knelt there for hours." (Life and Letters of Westcott, Vol. I, pg. 81)​

The quote originally was dug out of Westcott's writings by Seventh-Day Adventist pastor and KJV-only granddaddy Benjamin Wilkinson, in his 1930 book "Our Authorized Bible Vindicated", which was later reused by KJV-only authors J.J. Ray in "God Wrote Only One Bible" in 1955 and David Otis Fuller in "Which Bible?" in 1970. Since then, the quote has become well-used, appearing in many KJV-only publications and websites, in an attempt to show that Westcott was Catholic and/or worshipped Mary, etc. The quote comes from a letter Wescott wrote to his fiancée in 1847, when he was 22 years old and sight-seeing in the town of Ashby de la Zouch in England. The entire letter is reproduced below, with the quote in bold and important context underlined:

ASHBY-DE-LA-ZOUCH,
2nd Sunday after Epiphany, 1847.​

My dearest Mary—As I fancy that we shall go out to-morrow, I will begin my note now without a longer preface. Yesterday we had a splendid walk to the monastery,1 going the same road as you went in summer; but now all the trees and hedges are covered with a delicate white frost, and the craggy rocks seemed gigantic in the mist, and all the country looked more lovely and wild and un-English than I have ever before seen it. We went into the chapel; but I cannot say that I was so much pleased with it as before, and the reason was that I did not hear the solemn chant of those unearthly voices which seem clearly to speak of watchings and fastings, and habits of endurance and self-control which would be invaluable if society could reap their fruits; as it was, the excessive finery and meanness of the ornaments seemed ill to suit the spiritual worship which we are told should mark the true church. After this we went round the cloisters and into the Refectory, but I felt less than ever to admire their selfish life . After leaving the monastery we shaped our course to a little oratory which we discovered on the summit of a neighbouring hill, and by a little scrambling we reached it. Fortunately we found the door open. It is very small, with one kneeling-place; and behind a screen was a “Pieta” the size of life (i.e. a Virgin and dead Christ). The sculpture was painted, and such a group in such a place and at such a time was deeply impressive. I could not help thinking on the fallen grandeur of the Romish Church, on her zeal even in error, on her earnestness and self-devotion, which we might, with nobler views and a purer end, strive to imitate. Had I been alone I could have knelt there for hours. On leaving, we followed a path across beautiful rocks fringed by firs loaded with hoar-frost, and, passing by many a little deepening glen, came to the road, above which stood a large crucifix. I wish it had been a cross. I wish earnestly we had not suffered superstition to have brought that infamy on the emblem of our religion which persecution never could affix to it. But I am afraid the wish is vain.
I thought I had spoken to you of the fearful distress in Ireland (and in parts of Scotland too). I am sure you will feel as I do. I have very little money to spare, but if there is any collection I wish you would give five shillings for me, and I will pay you when I return; and let us not only think of the temporal wants of our unfortunate sister isle, but also of its spiritual degradation, which is, I am sure, closely connected with its present miseries. . . .
1 Carmelite settlement at Grâce Dieu.​

You can see from the important context throughout the letter, including context that was skipped over and replaced with the second ellipsis, that Westcott had harsh words for Catholicism. In just this short letter, he expressed that he viewed the life of a monk as "selfish", and that he believed the "Romish Church" (a derogatory term a Catholic would not use) to be "in error". He even called the crucifix "superstition" and "infamy" when compared to a plain cross. Lastly, he refers briefly to the "distress in Ireland", which is undoubtedly the severe famine that started in 1845 and lasted until 1851, resulting in the death of approximately 20% of the population. Westcott expresses that he feels this distress is "closely connected" with "its spiritual degradation" - the Irish at that time in strong opposition to the British State Church (Anglican) and growing in Catholicism, Catholics outnumbering Protestants approximately seven to one by 1861.



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robycop3

Well-known member
You really should check the facts before you accuse someone of being a cultist. You should also know what Riplinger said about Westcott. A blatant lie.

Here is the KJVO lie, corrected by the Westcott and Hort Resource Centre.


Quote #2: "After leaving the monastery, we shaped our course to a little oratory which we discovered on the summit of a neighbouring hill. . . . Fortunately we found the door open. It is very small, with one kneeling place; and behind a screen was a ‘Pieta’ the size of life [i.e. a Virgin and dead Christ]. . . . Had I been alone I could have knelt there for hours." (Life and Letters of Westcott, Vol. I, pg. 81)​

The quote originally was dug out of Westcott's writings by Seventh-Day Adventist pastor and KJV-only granddaddy Benjamin Wilkinson, in his 1930 book "Our Authorized Bible Vindicated", which was later reused by KJV-only authors J.J. Ray in "God Wrote Only One Bible" in 1955 and David Otis Fuller in "Which Bible?" in 1970. Since then, the quote has become well-used, appearing in many KJV-only publications and websites, in an attempt to show that Westcott was Catholic and/or worshipped Mary, etc. The quote comes from a letter Wescott wrote to his fiancée in 1847, when he was 22 years old and sight-seeing in the town of Ashby de la Zouch in England. The entire letter is reproduced below, with the quote in bold and important context underlined:

ASHBY-DE-LA-ZOUCH,
2nd Sunday after Epiphany, 1847.​


1 Carmelite settlement at Grâce Dieu.​

You can see from the important context throughout the letter, including context that was skipped over and replaced with the second ellipsis, that Westcott had harsh words for Catholicism. In just this short letter, he expressed that he viewed the life of a monk as "selfish", and that he believed the "Romish Church" (a derogatory term a Catholic would not use) to be "in error". He even called the crucifix "superstition" and "infamy" when compared to a plain cross. Lastly, he refers briefly to the "distress in Ireland", which is undoubtedly the severe famine that started in 1845 and lasted until 1851, resulting in the death of approximately 20% of the population. Westcott expresses that he feels this distress is "closely connected" with "its spiritual degradation" - the Irish at that time in strong opposition to the British State Church (Anglican) and growing in Catholicism, Catholics outnumbering Protestants approximately seven to one by 1861.



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KJVOs, having no actual evidence to support their myth, must invent boogermen to blame for causing "corrupt" (non-KJV) Bible versions to be made. they forget that the KJV itself supports NO single Bible version, and its makers soundly refute such in their preface to the AV 1611, "To The Reader". Unfortunately, later KJV editions leave that preface out. It would go a great way in preventing KJVO if it were included in all KJV copies.
 

glenlogie

Well-known member
KJVOs, having no actual evidence to support their myth, must invent boogermen to blame for causing "corrupt" (non-KJV) Bible versions to be made. they forget that the KJV itself supports NO single Bible version, and its makers soundly refute such in their preface to the AV 1611, "To The Reader". Unfortunately, later KJV editions leave that preface out. It would go a great way in preventing KJVO if it were included in all KJV copies.
They would blame the publisher for including factual data that undermines KJVOism
 

John t

Super Member
What if the Greek text and the Kjv disagreed, whose say would be final authority?

If you think about the unintended consequences of that inane sentence for more than 30 seconds, you would see that you are attempting to create a hypothetical that is impossible to substantiate.

Besides that, if you have ever studied either Hebrew of Greek from a learned professor, who was on the final version committee of any translation, (as I did) you would know that EVERY translation has words/ phrases that are better rendered years after the translation goes to press. That has NADA to do with "inspiration" ; rather it has to do with the evolution of every language on the planet.
 

YeshuaFan

Well-known member
Neither
Neither, the W/H Greek was and is used in MV’s. NIce try though. Are you a free mason or a RC ? You do know W/H started the Ghostly Guild and believed they could communicate with the dead right ? Doesn’t God forbid communicating with the dead ? That is who folks trust when they study MV’s men who ignored God.
Mason nor Catholic, and do know that the MV were translated by those who held superior theological views then the 1611 translators did!
 
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YeshuaFan

Well-known member
Neither, the W/H Greek was and is used in MV’s. NIce try though. Are you a free mason or a RC ? You do know W/H started the Ghostly Guild and believed they could communicate with the dead right ? Doesn’t God forbid communicating with the dead ? That is who folks trust when they study MV’s men who ignored God.
I meant which Greek text is the real one per Kjvo then? MT or the various TR?
 
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