Has God performed the greatest act of love and Christadelphianism

Stephen

Active member
https://carm.org/questions-for-christadelphians

CARM poses the titular question. The argument is as follows:

This is an unusual question. Has God performed the greatest act of love? It is a question designed to provoke deeper thought on the nature of God and what He has done in our lives. God is love (1 John 4:8). So, I ask if God has been as loving as is possible? The answer would depend on whether or not you are a Christian.

Jesus tells us what the greatest act of love is. He said in John 15:13, "Greater love has no one than this, that one lay down his life for his friends."
To Christadelphians, Jesus is not God. He is a creation with a fallen and sinful nature. Yet it is Jesus who sacrificed Himself for others. According to Jesus' own words He Himself has performed the greatest act of love. His sacrifice is even more monumental and loving when we consider that He bore our sins in his body on the cross (1 Pet. 2:24). Undoubtedly, Jesus performed the greatest act of love.

However, if you are the Christadelphian, then Jesus is not God. This would mean that Jesus, being a created thing, has performed a greater act of love than God Himself. It would mean that in Christadelphianism, Jesus who is a creature, has actually outperformed God Himself. That would mean that God is not one who has nor can perform the greatest act of love.

So far this is an interesting argument. But things start going awry in the next couple of sentences.

On the other hand, in Trinitarianism, God is the one who has performed the greatest act of love. This is because in the doctrine of the Trinity we have Jesus, God in flesh, second person of the Trinity, who laid His life down for His friends. In this, God has indeed performed the greatest act of love, not a creature. And since God is love, is it not fair to expect that the infinite God who is all powerful can fulfill the very words He inspired as truth?

In Trinitarianism, “God is a Trinity of persons” (https://carm.org/trinity). Neither "God the Holy Spirit", nor God the Father died according to the Trinitarian. Only "God the son died" according to Trinitarian doctrine. This means that God hasn’t performed the greatest act of love under Trinitarian doctrine as the Trinity of persons (a.k.a. "God") didn’t die.

The conclusion is the author hasn’t considered his own doctrines when making the argument.

When someone sins against you and you intend to forgive him, is it right to appoint someone else to be the one who forgives that person or must you do it yourself? Is it more loving for you to appoint another who is uninvolved in the offense against you to make satisfaction? Or, must you make satisfaction yourself? Is it a greater love to have a creature die for offenses suffered against God, or for God to bear the act and work of forgiveness Himself? The answer should be obvious.

In Christadelphian theology, God is less a lover of our souls than the God of Trinitarianism.

The questioner poses four questions which will be addressed in turn

Is it right to appoint someone else to be the one who forgives that person or must you do it yourself?

It isn’t up to mere humans to tell God that he cannot forgive through an intermediary.

You can forgive somebody however you choose. People and organizations entrust employees to forgive routinely, even at the employee’s own discretion without obtaining the consent of the employer. On what basis does the questioner believe God cannot do what humans can do.

Is it more loving for you to appoint another who is uninvolved in the offense against you to make satisfaction?
Christadelphians don’t believe “satisfaction” will be made. We believe that God loves us and forgives us out of love for us. The idea of “satisfaction” is irrelevant.

To answer the question, it is more loving to forgive without “satisfaction” than it is forgive while requiring “satisfaction”.
Or, must you make satisfaction yourself?
See answer to question number 2.

Is it a greater love to have a creature die for offenses suffered against God, or for God to bear the act and work of forgiveness Himself?

Examining the choices: In the first choice, a creature dies and God lives, and in the second choice God dies.

As a child of my parents, I would much rather my parents live and a creature die than the reverse. As a child of God, I can unequivocally state that God still being alive and involved in my life is the greater act of love than God dying and no longer being involved in my life.





The questions conclude with:

“In Christadelphian theology, God is less a lover of our souls than the God of Trinitarianism.”

The conclusion seems isn’t supported by the answers to the questions. By the author’s admission, his God forgives him only if “satisfaction” is made. In contrast, the God of Israel loves his servants and doesn’t demand satisfaction, rather he demands that his children act like him and do as he does by forgiving.

I submit the well-known words of the Lord’s prayer:

“Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil
 

Bob Carabbio

Active member

Has God performed the greatest act of love​

Of course. Jesus, with his PERFECT SIN OFFERING, (Isa 53) made it possible for those humans who place their FAITH in his BLOOD sacrifice for the cleansing of their SIN to be indwelled by the Holy Spirit and become perfect in the sight of God in Jesus Christ.

It doesn't get better than that. Eph 2:8,9
 
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