"Have you tried turning it off and back on again?"

Torin

Well-known member
Notoriously, computer technicians ask this a lot. Why?

The reason is that your computer can develop issues if it stays on for a long time. Most people don't know that, so they leave their computer running for days on end, without doing a full shutdown. Computer technicians understand this about people, so one of the first questions they will ask (depending on the issue) is when the computer was last turned off or restarted.

You can see your computer's "uptime" on Task Manager, under the Performance tab. If it is something crazy like two days, you might want to restart your computer.

Along the same lines, it's a good idea to fully shut down your computer every night before you go to bed.

Thanks for reading. Let me know your thoughts! :)
 

Victor

Active member
Notoriously, computer technicians ask this a lot. Why?

The reason is that your computer can develop issues if it stays on for a long time. Most people don't know that, so they leave their computer running for days on end, without doing a full shutdown. Computer technicians understand this about people, so one of the first questions they will ask (depending on the issue) is when the computer was last turned off or restarted.

You can see your computer's "uptime" on Task Manager, under the Performance tab. If it is something crazy like two days, you might want to restart your computer.

Along the same lines, it's a good idea to fully shut down your computer every night before you go to bed.

Thanks for reading. Let me know your thoughts! :)
Task Manager is a MS Windows utility that is similar to System Monitor. I'm going to guess that you're using MS Windows 10 by your comments, which are pretty common. Windows 2000, XP, 7, and 8.1 were all stable products that would run for weeks (until the next update/bandaid/patch). Windows 10 is a good reason to make a transition to Linux.

If you need to run proprietary software or if you're on a corporate network, Windows is a better choice.
But...
If these restrictions don't apply to you, there is ample reason to determine MS Windows to be obsolete.
I'm currently running MX Linux 19.4 UEFI boot - not as pretty as Linux Mint but it has less nagging bugs.
Either one is more stable than Windows 10.
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
...
I'm currently running MX Linux 19.4 UEFI boot - not as pretty as Linux Mint but it has less nagging bugs.
Either one is more stable than Windows 10.
I'm running MX Linux 18.3 on two older laptops, 32-bit and 64-bit; gave up on Windows when XP was shelved. Update whenever I choose.
 

Victor

Active member
I'm running MX Linux 18.3 on two older laptops, 32-bit and 64-bit; gave up on Windows when XP was shelved. Update whenever I choose.
I was a dedicated fan of Linux Mint 18.3, and have it installed on 3 laptops and one desktop. It was the last version with the Cinnamon desktop that was handsome and totally free of issues. It recently expired support, which made me move to Linux Mint 20.1 and found it buggy. MX Linux was the result of searching for a replacement, and I have it on two desktops. The nVidia driver provided for a Quadro K600 didn't support blanking video to sleep the monitor, so I unloaded the driver (it did work with Mint 20.1 XFCE). The other desktop has a AMD HD 7570 and it works perfectly.

I still have a need for Windows, for my wife's work. So I have MS Windows 7 on a couple of desktops. I don't use them, though.
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
I was a dedicated fan of Linux Mint 18.3, and have it installed on 3 laptops and one desktop. It was the last version with the Cinnamon desktop that was handsome and totally free of issues. It recently expired support, which made me move to Linux Mint 20.1 and found it buggy. MX Linux was the result of searching for a replacement, and I have it on two desktops. The nVidia driver provided for a Quadro K600 didn't support blanking video to sleep the monitor, so I unloaded the driver (it did work with Mint 20.1 XFCE). The other desktop has a AMD HD 7570 and it works perfectly.

I still have a need for Windows, for my wife's work. So I have MS Windows 7 on a couple of desktops. I don't use them, though.
Old laptops, nVidia not an issue; once I get a newer model, I'll move to MX Linux 19 if not 20. I have to use Wine to access some of the Windows programs not available in Linux. One desktop still has XP; I keep it because restore OEM is on a partition which does not require activation.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
Notoriously, computer technicians ask this a lot. Why?

The reason is that your computer can develop issues if it stays on for a long time. Most people don't know that, so they leave their computer running for days on end, without doing a full shutdown. Computer technicians understand this about people, so one of the first questions they will ask (depending on the issue) is when the computer was last turned off or restarted.

You can see your computer's "uptime" on Task Manager, under the Performance tab. If it is something crazy like two days, you might want to restart your computer.

Along the same lines, it's a good idea to fully shut down your computer every night before you go to bed.

Thanks for reading. Let me know your thoughts! :)
Back in the day we had close to a thousand headless systems running Slackware, no gui, that we measured uptime in years.

Other than a truly ancient, almost old enough to drink in all fifty states, dual boot (Linux/XP) laptop I hope to never use MS.
 

shnarkle

Well-known member
I'm currently running MX Linux 19.4 UEFI boot - not as pretty as Linux Mint but it has less nagging bugs.
Either one is more stable than Windows 10.
Lately, I've had a few people suggest I scrap Windows, and download Linux. One guy told me he's been using it for over 20 years, and has never had a problem with it. He likes that he doesn't have to deal with updates, malware, security issues, etc. I looked at the options, but got bogged down in trying to figure out what was the best option. I'm also somewhat technologically retarded so I'm not familiar with a lot of the jargon.

How much trouble do you think I would have if I was successful in downloading Linux?

What sort of bugs did you have on the previous iteration you were using?
 

Victor

Active member
Lately, I've had a few people suggest I scrap Windows, and download Linux. One guy told me he's been using it for over 20 years, and has never had a problem with it. He likes that he doesn't have to deal with updates, malware, security issues, etc. I looked at the options, but got bogged down in trying to figure out what was the best option. I'm also somewhat technologically retarded so I'm not familiar with a lot of the jargon.

How much trouble do you think I would have if I was successful in downloading Linux?

What sort of bugs did you have on the previous iteration you were using?
Visit distrowatch and read their summaries about the various distributions of Linux. That is a good way to start. You can also find occasional reviews of specific distros on c|net and other sources by typing the name of the distro in a search utility (duck duck go).

Bugs boil down to support for some hardware. nVidia graphics cards have had a long history of power management problems with their drivers, such as won't blank the monitor or won't recover after they do. Linux Mint 20.1 XFCE is the first distro I have had that ran a nVidia Quadro K600 properly, while the driver in MX Linux won't blank the monitor. Mint 18.3 was the last version that ran everything perfectly, while 20.1 has problems with audio. Fedora 33 has a polished version of the Gnome desktop, while Fedora 34 looks ... strange. Spins/versions that use the Cinnamon desktop are the most friendly for making a transition from Windows, and XFCE is a similar menu-driven feel most master in 5 minutes with less eye candy.

Drop a AMD graphics card in your box and you won't have any problems with video. I settled on the old HD 7570 that you can still fetch on ebay for cheap. V4900 in full height is also a proven performer.

Most of the distros provide a ISO file that will burn the image onto a bootable DVD, usually close to 2GB download. They are 'live' images that boot and let you play with the OS before committing it to your disk/SSD. This makes it safe to explore before erasing your disk. I suggest installing a new SSD and that way you have your old OS to fall back onto if you aren't happy. 120GB is ample unless you transfer massive multimedia files.
 

shnarkle

Well-known member
Visit distrowatch and read their summaries about the various distributions of Linux. That is a good way to start.
Thanks. I'll check it out.
Mint 18.3 was the last version that ran everything perfectly, while 20.1 has problems with audio.
If I'm reading this correctly, 18.3 came out before 20.1? When something new comes out that doesn't work as good as what you had before, can you just go back to the 18.3?
Fedora 33 has a polished version of the Gnome desktop, while Fedora 34 looks ... strange.
These can only be used on desktop computers?
Spins/versions that use the Cinnamon desktop are the most friendly for making a transition from Windows, and XFCE is a similar menu-driven feel most master in 5 minutes with less eye candy.
This sounds like what I may be looking for. I check email, interact in places like this, read stuff online, buy a few things on Amazon, or ebay, and occasionally watch a few videos on youtube, or vimeo etc.
Drop a AMD graphics card in your box
Where is this "box" you're referring to? How do you drop it in?
and you won't have any problems with video. I settled on the old HD 7570 that you can still fetch on ebay for cheap. V4900 in full height is also a proven performer.

Most of the distros provide a ISO file that will burn the image onto a bootable DVD,
usually close to 2GB download.
What kind of DVD would you recommend? Do I just find one that can hold more than 2GB?
They are 'live' images that boot and let you play with the OS before committing it to your disk/SSD. This makes it safe to explore before erasing your disk. I suggest installing a new SSD and that way you have your old OS to fall back onto if you aren't happy.
Where does one install this "SSD"?
120GB is ample unless you transfer massive multimedia files.
I apologize for asking these questions. I know that I should probably already know what all of these terms mean, and their purpose.
 

Victor

Active member
Thanks. I'll check it out.

If I'm reading this correctly, 18.3 came out before 20.1? When something new comes out that doesn't work as good as what you had before, can you just go back to the 18.3?
Yes, Mint 18.3 is now obsolete, and you may have to search for the ISO for it. Mint's website offers the current ISO only. I recommend setting your BIOS for UEFI boot before installing 20.x.
These can only be used on desktop computers?
No, Linux works fine on the majority of laptops. Drivers for wireless networking, trackpads, and other gizmos unique to laptops are already built into the OS.
This sounds like what I may be looking for. I check email, interact in places like this, read stuff online, buy a few things on Amazon, or ebay, and occasionally watch a few videos on youtube, or vimeo etc.
If you have no need for networking in a corporate environment then Linux is perfect for you.
Where is this "box" you're referring to? How do you drop it in?
Desktop computers are boxes. They have slots for expansion cards.
What kind of DVD would you recommend? Do I just find one that can hold more than 2GB?
DVD-R's by design will record up to 4.7 GB of data. Whatever works in your DVD recordable drive is fine. Everything since Windows 7 has DVD burning software built in.
Where does one install this "SSD"?
It replaces the hard drive inside your laptop or desktop computer. Plug in the SATA data cable and the power and presto! you vastly improve your computer's performance.
I apologize for asking these questions. I know that I should probably already know what all of these terms mean, and their purpose.
 
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