How Did Jesus fulfill the Law

Yodas_Prodigy

Well-known member
It is commonly said that Jesus fulfilled all of the laws, and in return fulfilled all of the laws for us. But is this really true?

There are some commandments that he could not have fulfilled on his own, but with the help of others.

1) Circumcision - his parents had this done for him, i.e., Lev 12:3

2) Consecration of first born - Joseph did this for him, i.e., Exodus 13:2

3) Redemption of first born - Joseph did this for him, i.e., Numbers 18:15

Are there more? Could be. But the point is that Jesus was "saved" as a result of others keeping the law for him.

I want to first point out this post created by our favorite MMA-Jew was a straw man. It's easy to win debates when one frames the argument contrary to what is actually said. I don't know any learned person who says Jesus fulfilled all of the laws. Some laws are fulfilled by women. Others are fulfilled by parents. Others are fulfilled by religious clergy.

So, let's start over on a level playing field.

Jesus said,
“Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill” (Matt 5:17)

Jesus said that He came to fulfill the Law and the Prophets. In other words, the Lord was giving a purpose statement for His ministry, and whenever someone does that, you had better pay attention! Jesus’ confrontations with the Pharisees and the rabbinic laws of the day raised questions about His relationship to the Law. What was He trying to do? Jesus answered that He did not come to destroy the Law and the Prophets, but to fulfill. But what does that mean? How does Jesus fulfill OT Scripture?

1. “Jesus fulfilled the principles and precepts of the law” (Eaton, The Way That Leads to Life, p. 46). The Mosaic Law had hundreds of commands and prescriptions for Israel to fulfill. And the OT prophets often acted as covenant lawyers bringing suit against Israel for failing to obey those commands. In contrast to Israel’s disobedience, Jesus fulfilled all the requirements of the Law in both His thoughts and His behavior. No one could critique His life or accuse Him of failing in His obligations to God. In a related sense, Jesus was also the greatest expositor of the Law, showing us, through His life and teaching, what it truly demanded. In sum, Jesus fulfilled the ethical demands of the Law and the Prophets.

2. “Jesus fulfilled the programs and prophecies of the Scriptures” (p. 47). Eaton explained that at the heart of the Scriptures was God’s plan to “undo the work of ‘the serpent’ (Gen 3:15).” The Bible is not primarily a book of laws, so much as a story of redemption. The Lord promised that the Seed of the woman would crush the serpent’s head. In other words, a Messiah was coming. And over time, God gradually revealed more information about what Messiah would be like, such as “a great Chosen King, a Suffering Servant, an Anointed Conqueror” (p. 48). Jesus fulfilled those roles (well, some of them; others await a future fulfillment in the kingdom). In sum, Jesus fulfilled the Messianic prophecies of the Law and the Prophets.

3. “Jesus fulfilled the patterns and pictures of the scriptures” (p. 48). Besides giving explicit commands and predictions, God’s Word also teaches through types and symbols. Trees, arks, lambs, priests, feasts, and sabbaths, and people such as Adam, Moses, Melchizedek, and David often foreshadow or prefigure what Messiah would be like and what He would do. Like Moses, Jesus taught on a mountain and delivered His people from slavery. Like David, Messiah will reign. Like a lamb, Jesus was sacrificed for sin. Like Melchizedek, He is a priest forever. In sum, Jesus fulfilled the Messianic types of the Law and the Prophets.

4. “Jesus fulfills the psalms and proverbs” (p. 48). How does He do that? By embodying the figure of the King we meet in the Psalms and of the Wise Man we see in Proverbs. In sum, Jesus fulfilled the wisdom of the Law and the Prophets.

 

Yodas_Prodigy

Well-known member
What does the Bible say Jesus meant by fulfill? Did He mean “fill to the full?”

Plēroō
In Matthew 5:17, the Greek word translated “fulfill” is plēroō. What does the Bible say this word means?

Can plēroō mean “fill to the full,” that is, to fill something as one would fill a glass of water? Yes. In fact, it often means this in the Bible. But the meaning is always natural and obvious from the context. Thus, the Bible speaks of being filled with wisdom (Luke 2:40), valleys being filled (Luke 3:5), a house being filled with an odor (John 12:3), sorrow filling hearts (John 16:6), and so on. Similarly, we also read of a net being full (Matthew 13:48) and several times of joy being full (John 15:11; 16:24; 1 John 1:4; 2 John 1:12).

There are also some Scriptures where time is fulfilled, obedience is fulfilled, etc., where someone might argue that plēroōcould be translated “filled to the full.”

On the other hand, I want to point out that in every case where plēroō is used in connection with the coming about of what was written or spoken in the law, or the prophets, or a prophet, or the Scriptures, or what Jesus had said earlier and so on, the meaning is always clearly “fulfill” as meaning to satisfy what was spoken or written so as to complete it.

 

Exeter

Member
Jesus said that He came to fulfill the Law and the Prophets.
It's a no brainer.


The Preeminence of Christ
Col 1:15
He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation.
Col 1:16 For by Him all things were created that are in heaven and that are on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers. All things were created through Him and for Him.
Col 1:17 And He is before all things, and in Him all things consist.
Col 1:18 And He is the head of the body, the church, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in all things He may have the preeminence.
Col 1:19 For it pleased the Father that in Him all the fullness should dwell,
Col 1:20
and by Him to reconcile all things to Himself, by Him, whether things on earth or things in heaven, having made peace through the blood of His cross.
Col 1:21 And you, who once were alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now He has reconciled
Col 1:22 in the body of His flesh through death, to present you holy, and blameless, and above reproach in His sight—
Col 1:23 if indeed you continue in the faith, grounded and steadfast, and are not moved away from the hope of the gospel which you heard, which was preached to every creature under heaven, of which I, Paul, became a minister.

BTW
Pro 26:4-5
(4) Do not answer a fool according to his folly, Lest you also be like him.
(5) Answer a fool according to his folly, Lest he be wise in his own eyes.
 

Jewjitzu

Well-known member
I want to first point out this post created by our favorite MMA-Jew
Thank you.

was a straw man. It's easy to win debates when one frames the argument contrary to what is actually said. I don't know any learned person who says Jesus fulfilled all of the laws.
It's said in these forums all of the time.

Some laws are fulfilled by women. Others are fulfilled by parents. Others are fulfilled by religious clergy.
And in Jesus case, some of the laws were fulfilled for him, so he relies on the righteousness of others.

So, let's start over on a level playing field.
It was level.

Jesus said,
“Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill” (Matt 5:17)

Jesus said that He came to fulfill the Law and the Prophets. In other words, the Lord was giving a purpose statement for His ministry, and whenever someone does that, you had better pay attention! Jesus’ confrontations with the Pharisees and the rabbinic laws of the day raised questions about His relationship to the Law. What was He trying to do? Jesus answered that He did not come to destroy the Law and the Prophets, but to fulfill. But what does that mean? How does Jesus fulfill OT Scripture?

1. “Jesus fulfilled the principles and precepts of the law” (Eaton, The Way That Leads to Life, p. 46). The Mosaic Law had hundreds of commands and prescriptions for Israel to fulfill. And the OT prophets often acted as covenant lawyers bringing suit against Israel for failing to obey those commands. In contrast to Israel’s disobedience, Jesus fulfilled all the requirements of the Law in both His thoughts and His behavior. No one could critique His life or accuse Him of failing in His obligations to God.
Hmm... he did say only God is good.

In a related sense, Jesus was also the greatest expositor of the Law, showing us, through His life and teaching, what it truly demanded. In sum, Jesus fulfilled the ethical demands of the Law and the Prophets.

2. “Jesus fulfilled the programs and prophecies of the Scriptures” (p. 47). Eaton explained that at the heart of the Scriptures was God’s plan to “undo the work of ‘the serpent’ (Gen 3:15).” The Bible is not primarily a book of laws, so much as a story of redemption. The Lord promised that the Seed of the woman would crush the serpent’s head. In other words, a Messiah was coming. And over time, God gradually revealed more information about what Messiah would be like, such as “a great Chosen King, a Suffering Servant, an Anointed Conqueror” (p. 48).
Hmmm... I'd like to see how he fulfilled the law of kings in Deut 17:14-20. He didn't.

Jesus fulfilled those roles (well, some of them; others await a future fulfillment in the kingdom). In sum, Jesus fulfilled the Messianic prophecies of the Law and the Prophets.
Sorry, he didn't. Especially when he says in Matthew 5:17-20 -

17Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets. I have not come to abolish them, but to fulfill them. 18For I tell you truly, until heaven and earth pass away, not a single jot, not a stroke of a pen, will disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished.

19So then, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do likewise will be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever practices and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. 20For I tell you that unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

I don't see Christianity teaching or doing the commandments.

3. “Jesus fulfilled the patterns and pictures of the scriptures” (p. 48). Besides giving explicit commands and predictions, God’s Word also teaches through types and symbols. Trees, arks, lambs, priests, feasts, and sabbaths, and people such as Adam, Moses, Melchizedek, and David often foreshadow or prefigure what Messiah would be like and what He would do. Like Moses, Jesus taught on a mountain and delivered His people from slavery. Like David, Messiah will reign. Like a lamb, Jesus was sacrificed for sin. Like Melchizedek, He is a priest forever. In sum, Jesus fulfilled the Messianic types of the Law and the Prophets.
This is a favorite fall back when actual things aren't accomplished.

4. “Jesus fulfills the psalms and proverbs” (p. 48). How does He do that? By embodying the figure of the King we meet in the Psalms and of the Wise Man we see in Proverbs. In sum, Jesus fulfilled the wisdom of the Law and the Prophets.

Nice try.
 

Yodas_Prodigy

Well-known member
I don't see Christianity teaching or doing the commandments.

It really depends upon the Denomination. Some teach we are no longer under the law, but instead, grace... The Law is our tutor.

Others teach that we are a lawful people. This group tends to teach that we are under the moral law, but not the ceremonial law...
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
What on earth does ''fulfil the law'' mean?

You either follow the law or you don't. It isn't a computer game where you complete all the side quests.

Are you saying you failed some of the side quests?

Sounds like an excuse for failure.
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
The Law is not just positive commands to do something a certain way.

It threatens extreme punishment for failure to comply.

A folksy and humanistic view of the OT has God being like one of us and letting people off the hook for any number of failures.
 

Jewjitzu

Well-known member
The Law is not just positive commands to do something a certain way.
There are positive commandments and negative commandments. Do this, don't do this.

It threatens extreme punishment for failure to comply.
There are commandments to pay back money or property, redeem a brother or property, fair measures in business, treatment of slaves, etc. In many cases, sacrifices are not required.

If you're talking about Lev 26, Deut 30, those curses are extreme based on continuous rebellion. Of interesting note, we don't see those curses happening today. That's not saying that Israel is perfect.

A folksy and humanistic view of the OT has God being like one of us and letting people off the hook for any number of failures.
Well, God has always been merciful since the garden.
 

Open Heart

Well-known member
It really depends upon the Denomination. Some teach we are no longer under the law, but instead, grace... The Law is our tutor.

Others teach that we are a lawful people. This group tends to teach that we are under the moral law, but not the ceremonial law...
The Torah makes no distinction between moral and ceremonial law. There are simply commands from God.
 

Dreidel

New Member
Are you saying you failed some of the side quests?

Sounds like an excuse for failure.
It is impossible for any human being to successfully ''fulfil'' [i.e. adhere to] every single law in the Torah. For example, a man is incapable of observing Torah laws specific to women and their menstruation cycles. A Jew who is not of the priest class is not able to observe those laws specific to the priest class. A carpenter, while capable of becoming a farmer, is not capable to remain a carpenter and still fulfil all laws pertaining to farmers. The list could go on and on.
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
It is impossible for any human being to successfully ''fulfil'' [i.e. adhere to] every single law in the Torah. For example, a man is incapable of observing Torah laws specific to women and their menstruation cycles. A Jew who is not of the priest class is not able to observe those laws specific to the priest class. A carpenter, while capable of becoming a farmer, is not capable to remain a carpenter and still fulfil all laws pertaining to farmers. The list could go on and on.

How about perfectly fulfilling every applicable law?

Stop making excuses.
 

Dreidel

New Member
How about perfectly fulfilling every applicable law?

Stop making excuses.
That's perfectly possible. But we all know Christians claim Jesus ''fulfilled THE LAW'' as in literally followed all the main quests, side quests, and won the game, thus ending the law. Total nonsense, but still, it's what you claim. Let's not be obtuse.
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
Ok, then you can't say Jesus was tempted in all ways.

The word means more like "tested" and it doesn't mean that everything that can tempt a person Jesus was tempted with.

What is tested is our heart, our nature, our attitudes, you know, "Love the Lord God with all your heart and you neighbor as yourself."

Do you do that perfectly? Can you love someone more than being willing to be punished for their sins?
 

Jewjitzu

Well-known member
The word means more like "tested" and it doesn't mean that everything that can tempt a person Jesus was tempted with.
Ok. Then this verse is wrong.

What is tested is our heart, our nature, our attitudes, you know, "Love the Lord God with all your heart and you neighbor as yourself."
You can't love God when you think you're Him.


Do you do that perfectly? Can you love someone more than being willing to be punished for their sins?
We're not asked to do suffer for someone else's sins, Ezekiel 18.
 
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