How is "Calvinism" Defined?

Theo1689

Well-known member
I don't expect this thread to generate much discussion, since I'm only presenting facts, and facts are not up for debate.

But many people (non-Calvinists) seem to think they are free to "define" Calvinism however they want, regardless of how it is historically understood.

What Calvinism does NOT teach:

1) Calvinism does NOT have a position on baptism. Calvinists include both those who hold to infant baptism (Presbyterians), and those who hold to believer's baptism (Reformed Baptists).

2) Calvinism does NOT have a position on eschatology. There are Calvinists who hold to amillennialism, and those who hold to dispensationalism. There are likely pre-mil's and post-mil's as well. (Which reminds me, I need to read through my two books on End Times by Sam Waldron.)

3) Calvinism does NOT teach "Once Saved, Always Saved", meaning license to sin, and can live a life of debauchery and still be saved. We believe in "Perseverance (or Preservation) of the Saints"), where a godly life is a sign of regeneration.

4) Calvinism does NOT teach a form of "faith alone" that teaches there will be no works. We believe works naturally follow a true saving faith, but the works do not contribute to our salvation.

There are likely others, but these are the ones which come immediately to mind.
 

TomFL

Well-known member
I don't expect this thread to generate much discussion, since I'm only presenting facts, and facts are not up for debate.

But many people (non-Calvinists) seem to think they are free to "define" Calvinism however they want, regardless of how it is historically understood.

What Calvinism does NOT teach:

1) Calvinism does NOT have a position on baptism. Calvinists include both those who hold to infant baptism (Presbyterians), and those who hold to believer's baptism (Reformed Baptists).

2) Calvinism does NOT have a position on eschatology. There are Calvinists who hold to amillennialism, and those who hold to dispensationalism. There are likely pre-mil's and post-mil's as well. (Which reminds me, I need to read through my two books on End Times by Sam Waldron.)

3) Calvinism does NOT teach "Once Saved, Always Saved", meaning license to sin, and can live a life of debauchery and still be saved. We believe in "Perseverance (or Preservation) of the Saints"), where a godly life is a sign of regeneration.

4) Calvinism does NOT teach a form of "faith alone" that teaches there will be no works. We believe works naturally follow a true saving faith, but the works do not contribute to our salvation.

There are likely others, but these are the ones which come immediately to mind.
I would agree with that

Has anyone claimed something contrary
 

TomFL

Well-known member
dispensational theology is generally not considered "reformed" but covenant theology is reformed.

But there are reformed dispensationalists was the point

As Theo noted
 
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civic

Well-known member
But there are reformed dispensationalist was the point

As Theo noted
that is a "modern" thing these days but not in any traditional sense of reformed theology, it is something new.

and you will see on this forum that many will not consider that I'm a calvinist. I'm only a calvinst as far as TULIP is concerned.
 

TomFL

Well-known member
that is a "modern" thing these days but not in any traditional sense of reformed theology, it is something new.

and you will see on this forum that many will not consider that I'm a calvinist. I'm only a calvinst as far as TULIP is concerned.
Are you familiar with the term Augustinian dispensationalism

It goes back a few decades but I guess you could call that modern
 

Oldsaint24

Active member
3) Calvinism does NOT teach "Once Saved, Always Saved", meaning license to sin, and can live a life of debauchery and still be saved. We believe in "Perseverance (or Preservation) of the Saints"), where a godly life is a sign of regeneration.
What??? I think you have a little play on words going on here.
Calvinists believe God regenerates who He will , when He will; it is a sovereign act of the Father.

Question: When one is regenerated to life by the Father (born from above) is the regenerate child of God eternally secure/saved?
Question: Can the regenerate child of God be eternally damned.......cast into the lake of fire.....experience the second death?
 

Oldsaint24

Active member
2) Calvinism does NOT have a position on eschatology. There are Calvinists who hold to amillennialism, and those who hold to dispensationalism. There are likely pre-mil's and post-mil's as well. (Which reminds me, I need to read through my two books on End Times by Sam Waldron.)
Oh but Calvinism DOES have a position on eschatology. And it is a hideous error.
Calvinism totally ignores the possibility that God's children can miss.......have no part in the age to come........have no seat at the marriage supper.
That is a very important part of eschatology for God's children and the Calvinists have been totally deceived about it.

Question: Can God's children miss the first resurrection? (this should be a simple yes or no for any Calvinist)
 

TomFL

Well-known member
2) Calvinism does NOT have a position on eschatology. There are Calvinists who hold to amillennialism, and those who hold to dispensationalism. There are likely pre-mil's and post-mil's as well. (Which reminds me, I need to read through my two books on End Times by Sam Waldron.)
Neither do non Calvinists

Though dispensational premillennialism is rather popular
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
and you will see on this forum that many will not consider that I'm a calvinist. I'm only a calvinst as far as TULIP is concerned.

<Chuckle>

Do you remember the Arminian who used to post here, who refused to be convinced that A.T. Robertson was a Calvinist?
 

TomFL

Well-known member
Oh but Calvinism DOES have a position on eschatology. And it is a hideous error.
Calvinism totally ignores the possibility that God's children can miss.......have no part in the age to come........have no seat at the marriage supper.
That is a very important part of eschatology for God's children and the Calvinists have been totally deceived about it.

Question: Can God's children miss the first resurrection? (this should be a simple yes or no for any Calvinist)
A good chance at least some of them maybe many would not agree with your view of the first resurrection
 

Reformedguy

Well-known member
Oh but Calvinism DOES have a position on eschatology. And it is a hideous error.
Calvinism totally ignores the possibility that God's children can miss.......have no part in the age to come........have no seat at the marriage supper.
That is a very important part of eschatology for God's children and the Calvinists have been totally deceived about it.

Question: Can God's children miss the first resurrection? (this should be a simple yes or no for any Calvinist)
What is the first resurrection?
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
that is a "modern" thing these days but not in any traditional sense of reformed theology, it is something new.

and you will see on this forum that many will not consider that I'm a calvinist. I'm only a calvinst as far as TULIP is concerned.
Yes, I would say that Calvinism is defined by the 5-Solas and the 5-Points of Calvinism. Of course there are other Doctrines like Covenant Theology, Sovereignty, etc; but the five points are the core...
 

Oldsaint24

Active member
What is the first resurrection?
It is the bodily resurrection or rapture of God's obedient children at the end of this age, preceding the Sabbath Rest of God, the millennial kingdom, the age to come. There are two resurrections. The one I just defined and the second at the conclusion of the millennial kingdom for all the dead.
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
What??? I think you have a little play on words going on here.
Calvinists believe God regenerates who He will , when He will; it is a sovereign act of the Father.

Question: When one is regenerated to life by the Father (born from above) is the regenerate child of God eternally secure/saved?
Question: Can the regenerate child of God be eternally damned.......cast into the lake of fire.....experience the second death?

You are confused...

"Once saved, always saved" has a particular definition, that you might not be aware of.
It is a doctrine that says once you've accepted Christ as your Savior, you are free to go and live a life of sin ("license to sin"). Calvinists do NOT believe that.

OSAS is a doctrine that says you can accept Christ as Saviour, but you don't have to accept Him as Lord. Calvinists do NOT believe that.
 

Oldsaint24

Active member
You are confused...

"Once saved, always saved" has a particular definition, that you might not be aware of.
It is a doctrine that says once you've accepted Christ as your Savior, you are free to go and live a life of sin ("license to sin"). Calvinists do NOT believe that.

OSAS is a doctrine that says you can accept Christ as Saviour, but you don't have to accept Him as Lord. Calvinists do NOT believe that.
More play with words. And again.....a Calvinist who won't answer a simple question(s). I'll ask again and see if you will answer.

When one is regenerated to life by the Father of spirits (born from above) is the regenerate child of God eternally secure/saved?
Can the regenerate child of God be eternally damned...cast into the lake of fire....experience the second death?

Please......please....I don't want an explanation of this or that......I simply would appreciate your answer to my questions. Ok?
Experience tells me I probable won't get a simple yes or no.....but we will see. You might surprise me.
 
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