How to Authentically Speak in Tongues

Berserk

Member
A future post will explain why most initiations into speaking in tongues just produce babble that is of the flesh. But my OP will identify 3 proven principles for genuine glossolalia. Admittedly, the Holy Spirit cannot be limited to a specific operation formula. For example, when I was speaking in tongues at age 16, a visiting Lutheran pastor interrupted me to say he was an interested spectator who didn't believe in modern speaking in tongues. I didn't argue with him, but merely touched him gently on the forehead and he just exploded in other tongues!

(1) Praying in tongues is a form of praying in the Spirit (1 Corinthians 14:14). So to speak in tongues authentically, it is advisable to first learn to "pray in the Spirit" (Ephesians 6:18; Jude 20) in your own language. Paul makes it clear that praying in the Spirit is a key to waging effective spiritual warfare (Ephesians 6:11-18). Praying in the Spirit is spontaneous Spirit-directed prayer as opposed to consciously formulated prayers of intent.

(2) The expression "lost in praise" designates a particular type of praying in the Spirit that is often a launching pad for speaking in tongues. Being lost in praise is a type of intense longing for God in which the eruption of joy triggers spontaneous and uncontrolled praise in one's own language. It is the Lord who guides the praise: "O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise (Psalm 51:15)." This type of praise is superior because it reflects and derives from "the inner being" and "my secret heart" with which I am usually out of touch (51:6). Much of what we pass off as praise is forced and mechanical; so the Spirit's intervention is needed to create a "willing spirit" (51:12)." If our worship is too much of a head trip rather than a heart eruption, we may lose the Holy Spirit as an active force in our lives: "Do not cast me away from your presence and don't take your Holy Spirit from me (51:11)."

(3) To learn to pray in the Spirit, one should first learn how to "walk in the Spirit." Walking in the Spirit is often misunderstood as mere conscious obedience to God's Word, when in fact it is more mystical than that--the believer must master the art of being "led by the Spirit (Galatians 5:25)." Unless the believer has mastered this art, they will not experience all "the fruit of the Spirit (5:22-23)."

In my next planned post, I will share my testimony of how I learned to pray in the Spirit.
 
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Mik

Active member
A future post will explain why most initiations into speaking in tongues just produce babble that is of the flesh. But my OP will identify 3 proven principles for genuine glossolalia. Admittedly, the Holy Spirit cannot be limited to a specific operation formula. For example, when I was speaking in tongues at age 16, a visiting Lutheran pastor interrupted me to say he was an interested spectator who didn't believe in modern speaking in tongues. I didn't argue with him, but merely touched him gently on the forehead and he just exploded in other tongues!

(1) Praying in tongues is a form of praying in the Spirit (1 Corinthians 14:14). So to speak in tongues authentically, it is advisable to first learn to "pray in the Spirit" (Ephesians 6:18; Jude 20) in your own language. Paul makes it clear that praying in the Spirit is a key to waging effective spiritual warfare (Ephesians 6:11-18). Praying in the Spirit is spontaneous Spirit-directed prayer as opposed to consciously formulated prayers of intent.

(2) The expression "lost in praise" designates a particular type of praying in the Spirit that is often a launching pad for speaking in tongues. Being lost in praise is a type of intense longing for God in which the eruption of joy triggers spontaneous and uncontrolled praise in one's own language. It is the Lord who guides the praise: "O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise (Psalm 51:15)." This type of praise is superior because it reflects and derives from "the inner being" and "my secret heart" with which I am usually out of touch (51:6). Much of what we pass off as praise is forced and mechanical; so the Spirit's intervention is needed to create a "willing spirit" (51:12)." If our worship is too much of a head trip rather than a heart eruption, we may lose the Holy Spirit as an active force in our lives: "Do not cast me away from your presence and don't take your Holy Spirit from me (51:11)."

(3) To learn to pray in the Spirit, one should first learn how to "walk in the Spirit." Walking in the Spirit is often misunderstood as mere conscious obedience to God's Word, when in fact it is more mystical than that--the believer must master the art of being "led by the Spirit (Galatians 5:25)." Unless the believer has mastered this art, they will not experience all "the fruit of the Spirit (5:22-23)."

In my next planned post, I will share my testimony of how I learned to pray in the Spirit.
So was someone interpreting these 'tongues' you were speaking in public or was it just to edify yourselves?
 

Berserk

Member
So was someone interpreting these 'tongues' you were speaking in public or was it just to edify yourselves?

No, the camp meeting service had been dismissed and we were invited to come forward to pray at the altar. After a while, I was the only one left at the altar and was fervently seeking God's face, when I felt a mighty wind on the face and was wonderfully overpowered by the Spirit. Spectators drifted in and watched in awe as the sensed something supeanatural happening to me. One woman later told my my face was glowing in the dark and wondered if I realized this. One of the spectators was a skeptical Lutheran minister who told me he didn't believe om tongues and was just there as an interested spectator. I didn't argue with him; I just touched him gently on the forehead and he exploded in other tongues!

To learn more details about the context and background of my experience see my Life Journey thread in the Introduction section.
 

Mik

Active member
No, the camp meeting service had been dismissed and we were invited to come forward to pray at the altar. After a while, I was the only one left at the altar and was fervently seeking God's face, when I felt a mighty wind on the face and was wonderfully overpowered by the Spirit. Spectators drifted in and watched in awe as the sensed something supeanatural happening to me. One woman later told my my face was glowing in the dark and wondered if I realized this. One of the spectators was a skeptical Lutheran minister who told me he didn't believe om tongues and was just there as an interested spectator. I didn't argue with him; I just touched him gently on the forehead and he exploded in other tongues!

To learn more details about the context and background of my experience see my Life Journey thread in the Introduction section.
‘he exploded in other tongues’....so with all those watching you (self edifying?)....Did someone interpret these other tongues? Was it French, Italian, German...etc.?
 

Berserk

Member
‘he exploded in other tongues’....so with all those watching you (self edifying?)....Did someone interpret these other tongues? Was it French, Italian, German...etc.?
First, I thought I was alone in the amphitheater when the Spirit fell on me.
Second, at most 3 Christians drifted in to watch my miraculous Spirit outpouring unfold.
Interpretation need not accompany prayer tongues (See 1 Cor. 14:4; 14:28; cp. Acts 10:44-47; 19:2-6).
Paul's requirement of interpretation applies only to regular church services at which outsiders are invited and present.
 

Mik

Active member
No, the camp meeting service had been dismissed and we were invited to come forward to pray at the altar. After a while, I was the only one left at the altar and was fervently seeking God's face, when I felt a mighty wind on the face and was wonderfully overpowered by the Spirit. Spectators drifted in and watched in awe as the sensed something supeanatural happening to me. One woman later told my my face was glowing in the dark and wondered if I realized this. One of the spectators was a skeptical Lutheran minister who told me he didn't believe om tongues and was just there as an interested spectator. I didn't argue with him; I just touched him gently on the forehead and he exploded in other tongues!

To learn more details about the context and background of my experience see my Life Journey thread in the Introduction section.
Lot of me, me, me and I, I, I going on here. Humble?
 

SteveB

Well-known member
A future post will explain why most initiations into speaking in tongues just produce babble that is of the flesh. But my OP will identify 3 proven principles for genuine glossolalia. Admittedly, the Holy Spirit cannot be limited to a specific operation formula. For example, when I was speaking in tongues at age 16, a visiting Lutheran pastor interrupted me to say he was an interested spectator who didn't believe in modern speaking in tongues. I didn't argue with him, but merely touched him gently on the forehead and he just exploded in other tongues!

(1) Praying in tongues is a form of praying in the Spirit (1 Corinthians 14:14). So to speak in tongues authentically, it is advisable to first learn to "pray in the Spirit" (Ephesians 6:18; Jude 20) in your own language. Paul makes it clear that praying in the Spirit is a key to waging effective spiritual warfare (Ephesians 6:11-18). Praying in the Spirit is spontaneous Spirit-directed prayer as opposed to consciously formulated prayers of intent.

(2) The expression "lost in praise" designates a particular type of praying in the Spirit that is often a launching pad for speaking in tongues. Being lost in praise is a type of intense longing for God in which the eruption of joy triggers spontaneous and uncontrolled praise in one's own language. It is the Lord who guides the praise: "O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise (Psalm 51:15)." This type of praise is superior because it reflects and derives from "the inner being" and "my secret heart" with which I am usually out of touch (51:6). Much of what we pass off as praise is forced and mechanical; so the Spirit's intervention is needed to create a "willing spirit" (51:12)." If our worship is too much of a head trip rather than a heart eruption, we may lose the Holy Spirit as an active force in our lives: "Do not cast me away from your presence and don't take your Holy Spirit from me (51:11)."

(3) To learn to pray in the Spirit, one should first learn how to "walk in the Spirit." Walking in the Spirit is often misunderstood as mere conscious obedience to God's Word, when in fact it is more mystical than that--the believer must master the art of being "led by the Spirit (Galatians 5:25)." Unless the believer has mastered this art, they will not experience all "the fruit of the Spirit (5:22-23)."

In my next planned post, I will share my testimony of how I learned to pray in the Spirit.
Well, as speaking in tongues is for building up the body of Christ, and as ourselves, does it really matter what it sounds like to us?
I'm acquainted with preachers who believe that Paul used tongues to preach to people in non-Greek, and non-Hebrew speaking lands. So, regional dialects throughout Turkey, Macedonia, Italy, etc..., he was empowered by the Spirit to proclaim the gospel, and communicate to those people.

So, it seems to me that if we're praying in the Spirit, the words we use are immaterial, because they're for interpretation by God's Spirit, not other people. The idea is we're praying according to God's Will not our own, so what we think is babble is not the issue.
 

Berserk

Member
Lot of me, me, me and I, I, I going on here. Humble?
Your penchant for using ad hominems is a sad ploy to distract from what Paul actually teaches, teaching that threatens your simplistic preconceptions. You should realize that the vertical pronoun is needed in personal testimonies. God will hold you accountable for your judgmental spirit that presumes to know that someone you don't know does not give God all the glory.
 

Joe

Active member
A future post will explain why most initiations into speaking in tongues just produce babble that is of the flesh. But my OP will identify 3 proven principles for genuine glossolalia. Admittedly, the Holy Spirit cannot be limited to a specific operation formula. For example, when I was speaking in tongues at age 16, a visiting Lutheran pastor interrupted me to say he was an interested spectator who didn't believe in modern speaking in tongues. I didn't argue with him, but merely touched him gently on the forehead and he just exploded in other tongues!

(1) Praying in tongues is a form of praying in the Spirit (1 Corinthians 14:14). So to speak in tongues authentically, it is advisable to first learn to "pray in the Spirit" (Ephesians 6:18; Jude 20) in your own language. Paul makes it clear that praying in the Spirit is a key to waging effective spiritual warfare (Ephesians 6:11-18). Praying in the Spirit is spontaneous Spirit-directed prayer as opposed to consciously formulated prayers of intent.

(2) The expression "lost in praise" designates a particular type of praying in the Spirit that is often a launching pad for speaking in tongues. Being lost in praise is a type of intense longing for God in which the eruption of joy triggers spontaneous and uncontrolled praise in one's own language. It is the Lord who guides the praise: "O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise (Psalm 51:15)." This type of praise is superior because it reflects and derives from "the inner being" and "my secret heart" with which I am usually out of touch (51:6). Much of what we pass off as praise is forced and mechanical; so the Spirit's intervention is needed to create a "willing spirit" (51:12)." If our worship is too much of a head trip rather than a heart eruption, we may lose the Holy Spirit as an active force in our lives: "Do not cast me away from your presence and don't take your Holy Spirit from me (51:11)."

(3) To learn to pray in the Spirit, one should first learn how to "walk in the Spirit." Walking in the Spirit is often misunderstood as mere conscious obedience to God's Word, when in fact it is more mystical than that--the believer must master the art of being "led by the Spirit (Galatians 5:25)." Unless the believer has mastered this art, they will not experience all "the fruit of the Spirit (5:22-23)."

In my next planned post, I will share my testimony of how I learned to pray in the Spirit.
I'd like to comment that one cannot gift himself with something that comes from another. The Spirit of God gifts as He desires, and not everyone speaks in tongues. We cannot do anything to enable our self to speak in tongues. No formula such as saying the ABC's backwards, etc.

Those who are gifted with tongues are instructed to keep it to themselves if it is not a message for the church. And Paul instructed those who do speak in tongues and do not understand what they are speaking to ask God to interpret what they saying from their spirit. Not all instances, as a matter of experience, is a message given for the church. The most common use of speaking in tongues from one's spirit is edifying one's self.

I speak in tongues and do understand what is being said. The Lord led me to read about it in the bible, and then after desiring and asking Him to pour His Spirit out upon me, He answered my prayer and the Spirit of the Lord came upon me and and gave me the gift of tongues. Later on the Lord led me to read what Paul wrote about those who gifted with tongues without knowing the interpretation. I did as I was led and asked and sought to understand what was being said and the Lord graciously gave me that gift too.

The gifts of the Spirit are real and still for His church in this world. The misuse of tongues, along with those who have deceptively conned people, have given the gift of tongues a bad rap.

I state this for fellow followers of the Lord Jesus Christ, ask the Lord to pour His Spirit out upon you. Seek God's will for your life, the very purpose He has prepared for you beforehand, and ask Him to anoint you with His Spirit. Jesus was anointed by God's Spirit without measure. We too share in the spiritual blessings of Christ and receive a portion as God gives.

God bless
 
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Berserk

Member
A simpler way to distill my advice is to long for the transforming power of the gift of tongues, then set your request aside to instead passionately seek the Giver rather than the gift. As tears fill your eyes as you get ever more lost in praise, your words increasingly feel inadequate to express the intense sweetness of Jesus' presence. It is in such moments that the inadequacy you feel about your words is replaced by a glorious heavenly language that makes your spirit soar to unprecedented heights. When that happens, you will never be the same again.
 

CharismaticLady

Well-known member
A future post will explain why most initiations into speaking in tongues just produce babble that is of the flesh. But my OP will identify 3 proven principles for genuine glossolalia. Admittedly, the Holy Spirit cannot be limited to a specific operation formula. For example, when I was speaking in tongues at age 16, a visiting Lutheran pastor interrupted me to say he was an interested spectator who didn't believe in modern speaking in tongues. I didn't argue with him, but merely touched him gently on the forehead and he just exploded in other tongues!

That is a marvelous testimony. Thank you. Did the Lutheran pastor stay in touch. I'd like to know what he told his congregation, and if he is still Lutheran.

(1) Praying in tongues is a form of praying in the Spirit (1 Corinthians 14:14). So to speak in tongues authentically, it is advisable to first learn to "pray in the Spirit" (Ephesians 6:18; Jude 20) in your own language. Paul makes it clear that praying in the Spirit is a key to waging effective spiritual warfare (Ephesians 6:11-18). Praying in the Spirit is spontaneous Spirit-directed prayer as opposed to consciously formulated prayers of intent.

Personally, I believe the term praying in the Spirit IS praying in tongues - our own prayer language of Mark 16:16-18 that doesn't require interpretation or understanding. And what you described I would call prophesying - your language directed by the Spirit.

1 Corinthians 14 is a lesson on the two different types of "tongues" and uses.

Mark 16:16-18 - individual use for edifying self. Direction - TO God.
1 Corinthians 12 - gifts for profit of congregation, including another tongue, but must have interpretation. Direction - FROM God, that must be interpreted.

13 Therefore let him who speaks in a tongue pray that he may interpret. 14 For if I pray in a tongue, my spirit prays, but my understanding is unfruitful. 15 What is the conclusion then? I will pray with the spirit, and I will also pray with the understanding. I will sing with the spirit, and I will also sing with the understanding.

Praying with the Spirit is our private prayer language.
Praying with the understanding is tongues with interpretation for the profit of all.
 

CharismaticLady

Well-known member
I'd like to comment that one cannot gift himself with something that comes from another. The Spirit of God gifts as He desires, and not everyone speaks in tongues. We cannot do anything to enable our self to speak in tongues. No formula such as saying the ABC's backwards, etc.
Paul did. It is called laying on of hands. It is not always necessary though.

Romans 1:
11 For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, so that you may be established.

When it comes to God and the Spirit, try not to be too closed minded. You can't put Him in a nice small box. He loves to blow our minds. To inhibit formulas being made, I believe is why Jesus healed people in a different way just about every time. Even once having to do it twice to accomplish the healing.
 

CharismaticLady

Well-known member
Lot of me, me, me and I, I, I going on here. Humble?

I hope this unloving outburst is from jealousy and not plain ignorance of what a testimony is. It is a first-hand account of what God is doing to encourage fellow believers. And, of course, first-hand, means from the person it happened to, thus the me, me, me. If you humbled yourself and loved God as much as the one who gave the testimony, you could have your own testimony to share.
 

tbeachhead

Active member
Lot of me, me, me and I, I, I going on here. Humble?
I'm seeing a lot of judgment, misunderstanding and "I know more about your experience than you do." Not so humble.

Reviewing the thread and I could be wrong, but I see that you actually lured him into sharing his personal testimony. Would you please share your personal testimony with us, without using the pronouns "I", "me", "we" or "us?" That would be a real challenge.
 

Joe

Active member
Paul did. It is called laying on of hands. It is not always necessary though.

Romans 1:
11 For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, so that you may be established.
Paul did not gift himself with God's Spirit, nor did he gift himself with any spiritual gift. It is solely upon God who gives His Spirit, and the Spirit of God to gift those as He so desires.

The laying of hands is not the will of the one laying hands that is giving God's Spirit, nor is it the will of the hand layer who gives gifts of the Spirit upon the person whom the hand has been laid. Again, the Spirit of God is given by God and the gifts are given according as the Spirit desires.

And your understanding of Romans 1:11 is out of context...."For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, so that you may be established— that is, that I may be encouraged together with you by the mutual faith both of you and me." (Rom 1:11-12)

The spiritual gift Paul was speaking of was his faith, which Paul also mentioned that he too would benefit from their faith. Both Paul and the Roman Church would be encouraged together by their mutual faith in Jesus Christ.

God bless
 

CharismaticLady

Well-known member
Paul did not gift himself with God's Spirit, nor did he gift himself with any spiritual gift. It is solely upon God who gives His Spirit, and the Spirit of God to gift those as He so desires.
I get frustrated when people respond having not understood what is written.
 
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