Hypothetical Question for Christians

Torin

Well-known member
If I could prove to your satisfaction that there was a logical contradiction in the concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect being, would you become an atheist?

There's no "right" or "wrong" answer, here. I am just asking how you'd react to a proof like that.

Thanks.
 

docphin5

Well-known member
If I could prove to your satisfaction that there was a logical contradiction in the concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect being, would you become an atheist?

There's no "right" or "wrong" answer, here. I am just asking how you'd react to a proof like that.

Thanks.
Yes. If it was impossible for such an entity to exist then we should all be a-theists.
 

Eightcrackers

Well-known member
If I could prove to your satisfaction that there was a logical contradiction in the concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect being, would you become an atheist?

There's no "right" or "wrong" answer, here. I am just asking how you'd react to a proof like that.

Thanks.
You will never, ever get a yes/no answer to a yes/no question in here.
Ever.
Yes/no questions are seen as traps.
 

Whatsisface

Well-known member
If I could prove to your satisfaction that there was a logical contradiction in the concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect being, would you become an atheist?

There's no "right" or "wrong" answer, here. I am just asking how you'd react to a proof like that.

Thanks.
I wonder if any honest answers will tend towards no? Most christians don't believe because of logical arguments but for experiential, emotional reasons. For them, your question is in the wrong ballpark.
 

Torin

Well-known member
I wonder if any honest answers will tend towards no? Most christians don't believe because of logical arguments but for experiential, emotional reasons. For them, your question is in the wrong ballpark.
We're got one "No" and one "Yes," so far.
 

Eightcrackers

Well-known member
I wonder if any honest answers will tend towards no? Most christians don't believe because of logical arguments but for experiential, emotional reasons. For them, your question is in the wrong ballpark.
We've had one "no" already. Bear in mind, this question amounts to

"if it were shown that your god is impossible, would you stop believing in it?"

and somebody has answered "no".
 

Algor

Well-known member
We've had one "no" already. Bear in mind, this question amounts to

"if it were shown that your god is impossible, would you stop believing in it?"

and somebody has answered "no".
On the contrary, it is "If it were shown that your concept/abstract understanding/verbal characterization of God is impossible, would you stop believing etc".

The two are distinct questions. Faith and experience are (often) prior to doctrine.
 
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Algor

Well-known member
I wonder if any honest answers will tend towards no? Most christians don't believe because of logical arguments but for experiential, emotional reasons. For them, your question is in the wrong ballpark.
I would think that for many the answer would be "no". Religionists of all sorts will tell you that they are not that concerned with the logical ins and outs and paradoxes. It isn't a priority, and honestly, given that some sort of Abrahamic monotheism were true, I would not expect such a being to be readily comprehensible to begin with even if I thought the idea was coherent, so why would anyone fault a religionist for saying so?
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
If I could prove to your satisfaction that there was a logical contradiction in the concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect being, would you become an atheist?

There's no "right" or "wrong" answer, here. I am just asking how you'd react to a proof like that.

Thanks.

If you could demonstrate you had a path to ultimate absolute justified knowledge, I would believe everything you could prove.

However, since I am already convinced this is a logical impossibility, this hypothetical is known to me as impossible.
 

bigthinker

Well-known member
I wonder if any honest answers will tend towards no? Most christians don't believe because of logical arguments but for experiential, emotional reasons. For them, your question is in the wrong ballpark.
True. However, their ballpark keeps changing location and shape.
 

Algernon

Active member
If I could prove to your satisfaction that there was a logical contradiction in the concept of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect being, would you become an atheist?

There's no "right" or "wrong" answer, here. I am just asking how you'd react to a proof like that.

Thanks.
Morally perfect being? By whose definition? Think slavery for example. Historically Christians have been all over the place on that one. Same with capital punishment, race, homosexuality, abortion, etc.
 
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