I was a King James "Only" person until...

cawalls

New Member
I was saved by those who were King James Only, so therefore, I became King James Only. Until...

...One day when we were on the street witnessing, I noticed that everyone was witnessing in modern English and people were getting saved. It was not necessary to speak as they did in 1611 to get the lost saved.

But then again, the King James Bibles we use today are about five translations removed from the original King James Bible of 1611. I ordered a 1611 King James Bible from Amazon and could barely read it.

God bless
 

John t

Active member
I ordered a 1611 King James Bible from Amazon and could barely read it.

THAT is the Achilles Heel among the KJVO folk. In high school, they did not read anything of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in Middle English nor Shakespeare. So when they seek to "defend the KJV" they are actually defending a version of Scripture, which they cannot comprehend
 
R

Rotgold

Guest
THAT is the Achilles Heel among the KJVO folk. In high school, they did not read anything of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in Middle English
Let me quote:

The General Prologue​



Whan that aprill with his shoures soote
1
The droghte of march hath perced to the roote,
2
And bathed every veyne in swich licour
3
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
4
Whan zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
5
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
6
Tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
7
Hath in the ram his halve cours yronne,
8
And smale foweles maken melodye,
9
That slepen al the nyght with open ye
10
(so priketh hem nature in hir corages);
11
Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
12
And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
13
To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;
14
And specially from every shires ende
15
Of engelond to caunterbury they wende,
16
The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
17
That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.


I know it by heart. :)
 
R

Rotgold

Guest
That is not the point.
The point is the strange accusation that all translations newer than KJV are accused of being satanic.

KVJ in its time was also a new translation once.
 

John t

Active member
It is one of my favorite pieces of poetry. Evert time I read it, I hear a Scottish-like brogue in my head, I an 3rd or 4th generation in the USA
Let me quote:

The General Prologue​



Whan that aprill with his shoures soote
1
The droghte of march hath perced to the roote,
2
And bathed every veyne in swich licour
3
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
4
Whan zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
5
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
6
Tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
7
Hath in the ram his halve cours yronne,
8
And smale foweles maken melodye,
9
That slepen al the nyght with open ye
10
(so priketh hem nature in hir corages);
11
Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
12
And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
13
To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;
14
And specially from every shires ende
15
Of engelond to caunterbury they wende,
16
The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
17
That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.


I know it by heart. :)
 

John t

Active member
The KJV is much easier than Shakespeare.I've been reading/memorizing it since I was six years old. Anyone who has half a brain will easily understand the KJV.
I agree. It has a lyric quality about it that no other translation has. When I was doing Bible memory for myself, and ehrn I taught Bible memory in a Christian high school, I used the KJV.

Now, I use the ESV or the NET or the Holman Bible
 

SteveB

Well-known member
I was saved by those who were King James Only, so therefore, I became King James Only. Until...

...One day when we were on the street witnessing, I noticed that everyone was witnessing in modern English and people were getting saved. It was not necessary to speak as they did in 1611 to get the lost saved.

But then again, the King James Bibles we use today are about five translations removed from the original King James Bible of 1611. I ordered a 1611 King James Bible from Amazon and could barely read it.

God bless
In the late 70's, when I became a believer, the guy who told me about Jesus, and took me to church, and prayed with me afterwards to receive Christ, handed me a king james bible, and told me 4 things.
REad daily
Pray daily
Attend church regularly
Tell others about Jesus.

the first 3 made sense, the 4th terrified me, because I'd only JUST met Jesus, and knew next to nothing about him.

When I did finally start reading the bible, I struggled with the words....

thee,
thou
ye
therefore
wherefore
hitherto
heretofore
hath
etc....

It wasn't until the NKJV came out that I began reading it. I think that was in the early 80's. I read that until 2009-10, when I got my first smartphone bible app.
the app maker didn't have a license to the NKJV, so I began reading a comparable one, called--- World English Bible (WEB).
Not to be confused with the New World Translation (NWT), by the JW/WTS.

I started using the app because I realized that my eyes weren't as strong as they were in my younger days. I'd been wearing glasses, and had just started using bifocals. I'd tried magnifying sheets. but it was really awkward constantly shifting it around, trying to keep where I was reading in sight. The app allowed me to increase the font size to perfect scale, allowing me to continue reading.
As my mother in law, and other friends in the past had lost their ability to read, due to failing eyesight, I jumped on it without hesitation.
I have a friend whose father's eyesight failed, so I set up the bible app on his tablet, and increased the font size to something he could read. I then showed him the audio player, which allows for audio playback of the bible.


Now, the app I use on my smartphone has well over 100 different bible translations (no paraphrase here), including Hebrew and Greek Parallels, Strong's numbered, etc.....
I now swear by this app.....
I'm sure a day will come in the not too distant future where tech may be removed from society, or like Parler, outlawed, and removed, preventing us from accessing it. And in which case--- I focus on learning all I can, so the Holy Spirit will be able to do as Jesus said in John 14:26---- bring everything he taught us to our remembrance.

there are online versions of the NKJV available through the blue letter bible app. It's only available through an internet connection though, which is frustrating, if you're not in an area where you can readily get online.

Looking through the different translations, I've found that by and large, they're close enough to not be as big an issue as some people like to make it out to be. Others are an issue. And while I have numerous, the ones which require a license, for digital access, I do not have.

Keep reading the bible. If your eyes are growing old, get an app. The preferences allow you to increase the font size.
 

logos1560

Member
Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men. For laying aside

the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washing of pots and cups, and many other such things ye do. And he said unto them, Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition (Mark 7:7-9)

Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition (Matthew 15:6b)

But in vain they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men (Matthew 15:9)

Why do ye also transgress the commandment of God by your tradition? (Matthew 15:3b)

Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men (Col. 2:8a)

Beware of false prophets (Matt. 7:15a)

Not giving heed to Jewish fables, and commandments of men, that turn from the truth (Titus 1:14)

Let the prophets speak two or three, and let the other judge (1 Cor. 14:29)

We ought to obey God rather than men (Acts 5:29b)

Whether it be right in the sight of God to hearken unto you more than unto God, judge ye (Acts 4:19b)

One man esteemeth one day above another: another esteemeth every day alike. Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind. (Romans 14:5)

and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty (2 Corinthians 3:17b)

Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage. (Galatians 5:1)


KJV defender John Cereghin asked: "Isn't it strange that we condemn Catholics for their traditionalism and then proceed to force Baptists into accepting Baptist traditionalism?" (Maranatha Baptist Watchman, Feb., 1996, p. 3). Mickey Carter asserted that “we are not to accept ‘Baptist popes’ either” (Things That Are Different, p. 60). David Cloud wrote: “I do not have to rely on priests or scholars or tradition or extrabiblical sources” (Faith, p. 15). Jack Hyles declared: “The only authority that we as independent Baptists have is the Bible” (Need for an Every-Word Bible, p. 39). G. John Rov asserted: “Revelation has been traded for tradition in the name of human scholarship” (Concealed from Christians, pp. 96-97). J. J. Ray declared: “The true Word of God is thus made of none effect when mixed with tradition (Mark 7:13) (God Wrote, p. 3). After citing Jeremiah 23:16, Doug Stauffer wrote: “Extra-biblical teachings, traditions and doctrines (those established apart from the Bible) frequently contain no more truth than the words from the mouths of these false prophets” (One Book One Authority, p. 59). Concerning the Pharisees, Jeff Farnham declared: “Their addition was that they taught for doctrines the commandments of men and kept their own traditions. Their subtraction was in that they rejected the commandment of God” (God’s Forever Word, p. 17).

Pastor Glenn Conjurske, a strong advocate of reading the KJV and a critic of modern versions, wrote: “Traditionalism is doctrinally false, misapprehending entirely the ways of the Lord” (Olde Paths, Sept., 1996, p. 194). Glenn Conjurske suggested that “the tap root of all traditionalism” is “pride” and that “traditionalism is the short road to establishing the divinity of our own standards” (p. 195). Glenn Conjurske added: “Traditionalism is not only proud, but usually lazy also. It is a very comfortable position. There is great security in it. It saves us from the necessity of thinking” (Ibid.). Glenn Conjurske affirmed: “Traditionalism always involves a transfer of authority from the infallible Scriptures to some work of fallible man, on the supposition that the work of man is the work of God, and the only true representation of the Scriptures” (Ibid.). Glenn Conjurske also observed: “Traditionalists, of course, proceed upon the assumption that there can be no conflict between their standards and the Scriptures, as both are of God, but in this they are as naïve as they are mistaken, and to maintain the mistake they must often close their eyes to the facts. This shutting of the eyes is indeed one of the most prominent characteristics of the modern King-James-Only movement, which constantly denies facts, invents, contorts, and misrepresents them, rewrites history, and even condemns the recognition of facts as unbelief and rationalism” (pp. 195-196). Glenn Conjurske maintained that traditionalism “requires no mental exercise, no wrestling with difficulties, no facing of issues, no dealing with stubborn facts, but only a sacrifice of mind to a few pious assumptions, usually false” (Dec., 1997, p. 277).
 

Beloved Daughter

Well-known member
Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men. For laying aside

the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washing of pots and cups, and many other such things ye do. And he said unto them, Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition (Mark 7:7-9)

Thus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition (Matthew 15:6b)

But in vain they do worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men (Matthew 15:9)

Why do ye also transgress the commandment of God by your tradition? (Matthew 15:3b)

Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men (Col. 2:8a)

Beware of false prophets (Matt. 7:15a)

Not giving heed to Jewish fables, and commandments of men, that turn from the truth (Titus 1:14)

Let the prophets speak two or three, and let the other judge (1 Cor. 14:29)

We ought to obey God rather than men (Acts 5:29b)

Whether it be right in the sight of God to hearken unto you more than unto God, judge ye (Acts 4:19b)

One man esteemeth one day above another: another esteemeth every day alike. Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind. (Romans 14:5)

and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty (2 Corinthians 3:17b)

Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage. (Galatians 5:1)


KJV defender John Cereghin asked: "Isn't it strange that we condemn Catholics for their traditionalism and then proceed to force Baptists into accepting Baptist traditionalism?" (Maranatha Baptist Watchman, Feb., 1996, p. 3). Mickey Carter asserted that “we are not to accept ‘Baptist popes’ either” (Things That Are Different, p. 60). David Cloud wrote: “I do not have to rely on priests or scholars or tradition or extrabiblical sources” (Faith, p. 15). Jack Hyles declared: “The only authority that we as independent Baptists have is the Bible” (Need for an Every-Word Bible, p. 39). G. John Rov asserted: “Revelation has been traded for tradition in the name of human scholarship” (Concealed from Christians, pp. 96-97). J. J. Ray declared: “The true Word of God is thus made of none effect when mixed with tradition (Mark 7:13) (God Wrote, p. 3). After citing Jeremiah 23:16, Doug Stauffer wrote: “Extra-biblical teachings, traditions and doctrines (those established apart from the Bible) frequently contain no more truth than the words from the mouths of these false prophets” (One Book One Authority, p. 59). Concerning the Pharisees, Jeff Farnham declared: “Their addition was that they taught for doctrines the commandments of men and kept their own traditions. Their subtraction was in that they rejected the commandment of God” (God’s Forever Word, p. 17).

Pastor Glenn Conjurske, a strong advocate of reading the KJV and a critic of modern versions, wrote: “Traditionalism is doctrinally false, misapprehending entirely the ways of the Lord” (Olde Paths, Sept., 1996, p. 194). Glenn Conjurske suggested that “the tap root of all traditionalism” is “pride” and that “traditionalism is the short road to establishing the divinity of our own standards” (p. 195). Glenn Conjurske added: “Traditionalism is not only proud, but usually lazy also. It is a very comfortable position. There is great security in it. It saves us from the necessity of thinking” (Ibid.). Glenn Conjurske affirmed: “Traditionalism always involves a transfer of authority from the infallible Scriptures to some work of fallible man, on the supposition that the work of man is the work of God, and the only true representation of the Scriptures” (Ibid.). Glenn Conjurske also observed: “Traditionalists, of course, proceed upon the assumption that there can be no conflict between their standards and the Scriptures, as both are of God, but in this they are as naïve as they are mistaken, and to maintain the mistake they must often close their eyes to the facts. This shutting of the eyes is indeed one of the most prominent characteristics of the modern King-James-Only movement, which constantly denies facts, invents, contorts, and misrepresents them, rewrites history, and even condemns the recognition of facts as unbelief and rationalism” (pp. 195-196). Glenn Conjurske maintained that traditionalism “requires no mental exercise, no wrestling with difficulties, no facing of issues, no dealing with stubborn facts, but only a sacrifice of mind to a few pious assumptions, usually false” (Dec., 1997, p. 277).

Welcome home Rick!✝️
 
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