Icons are necessary for salvation, apparently

ziapueblo

Active member
A liturgy means public reading of God's words to the saints, just like it was done in synagogues. I encourage you to go to an Eastern Orthodox liturgy and see for yourself how they do it.
Yes everyone, please come to my Orthodox Church to see the worship of God. The reading of the Word of God and so much of the Psalms chanted/sung (which is like 90% of the Divine Liturgy). You will not be dissatisfied!

@Cynthia
My "Greek" Orthodox Church is all in English, with the exception of maybe the Trisagion hymn, which may at times be sung in Greek.
If you have icons of archangel Michael or Gabriel in your home, or on church building walls . .
Interesting that in the book of Revelation we see the use of incense :unsure:

Incense represents our prayers being lifted up to God.

@Septextura,
4 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth:

It's interesting that just a chapter or two later God commands Moses to put two Cherubim on the Ark and not to mention an image of a serpent for the Israelites to look upon and be healed o_O

In Christ!
ZP
 

Theophilos

Active member
If this is the case, American EO's certainly deviate from the typical in Europe. I've never seen an EO or RCC classroom either.

After Vatican II the RCC has moved towards English mass, which traditional Catholics seem to disapprove of.
The tradition in the East has been to use the local language. Most Orthodox Churches include liturgies in English in the US except for congregations with large numbers of recent immigrants.

Overseas sometimes an archaic version of the local language is used. For example, the church in Greece still uses New Testament Greek. Slavic churches frequently use Old Church Slavonic, which was the common language at the time of conversion 1000 years ago. Most languages have not changed as much as English so it usually possible to follow the meaning, and a translation into the modern language is usually available.

A similar situation exits among English-speaking Protestants who prefer to use the original King James Version of the bible.
 

Beloved Daughter

Super Member
Yes everyone, please come to my Orthodox Church to see the worship of God. The reading of the Word of God and so much of the Psalms chanted/sung (which is like 90% of the Divine Liturgy). You will not be dissatisfied!

@Cynthia
My "Greek" Orthodox Church is all in English, with the exception of maybe the Trisagion hymn, which may at times be sung in Greek.

Interesting that in the book of Revelation we see the use of incense :unsure:

Incense represents our prayers being lifted up to God.

@Septextura,
4 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth:

It's interesting that just a chapter or two later God commands Moses to put two Cherubim on the Ark and not to mention an image of a serpent for the Israelites to look upon and be healed o_O

In Christ!
ZP
nt
 

Bob Carabbio

Well-known member

God destroyed their empire and enslaved them to Islam, which despises graven images. The flag of Constantinople is now the symbol for all Islam. When will these people learn?
Icons, Statues, Paintings, etc. are nothing more than "Art" to attach to structures, or become dust-catchers on pedestals for the aesthetic enjoyment of the viewers thereof (kind of like the 18" Ceramic Crucifix in my entry hall at home). But none of it has any SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE. it's just a bunch of "Things".
 
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Septextura

Well-known member
Icons, Statues, Paintings, etc. are nothing more that "Art" to attach to structures, or become dust-catchers on pedestals for the aesthetic enjoyment of the viewers thereof (kind of like the 18" Ceramic Crucifix in my entry hall at home). But none of it has any SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE. it's just a bunch of "Things".

That's what they were before the 6th century, visualization of Biblical events and characters, nothing more.
 
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