Lake Mead levels down.

CrowCross

Super Member

I also listened to someone that collects rainwater for use in the southwest region. His proof-of-principle is working to date and he believes that rainwater collection should be the primary source of water and use of the Colorado and aquifers should be implemented as a backup supply.

"We can really no longer look at the past and say: The amount of water we've had in the last 100 years is what we can expect in the future," says Eric Kuhn, an author who worked on water policy for decades at the Colorado River Water Conservation District. "That is no longer true because of climate change." - NPR

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I've read where a lot of the water has been allowed to flow into the ocean....I don't remember why, perhaps to save some fish species...
If I run across the article I'll post it.
 

inertia

Super Member
The claim that water usage from the Colorado has gone down with various conservation measures? It is a fact. Now the cuts to water usage will have to be even greater.

Thanks for the link.

82E55CC2-A02D-4C68-9C33E45ED0DBE3EF_source.jpg


Researchers have been publishing their models about the Colorado River Basin a while now. Here is one from ----> 2004.

Here is a current model concentrating on the effects of baseflow (groundwater flowing to streams) in the Colorado River Basin ---> 2021

"Results show that the largest declines in baseflow may occur in the headwater streams, and the total baseflow delivered to the Lower Colorado River Basin may decline by up to 33%, although delivery may increase in the near future by 6% under a warm/wet climate."

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Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
minimum required release of 9,000,000 acre feetper year.

Watch how neurotic alarmists treat facts. Months ago, there was a huge flood in Yellowstone Park. But most east of the Continental divide.
We are very familiar with the Green River which goes into the Colorado. The flood went mostly eastward.

God is in control.

Heavy snows in Colorado. We had our Christmas 9 days ago because so many in the family are skiing this week.
 

inertia

Super Member
Thanks for the link.

82E55CC2-A02D-4C68-9C33E45ED0DBE3EF_source.jpg


Researchers have been publishing their models about the Colorado River Basin a while now. Here is one from ----> 2004.

Here is a current model concentrating on the effects of baseflow (groundwater flowing to streams) in the Colorado River Basin ---> 2021

"Results show that the largest declines in baseflow may occur in the headwater streams, and the total baseflow delivered to the Lower Colorado River Basin may decline by up to 33%, although delivery may increase in the near future by 6% under a warm/wet climate."

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According to the Denver Post (01/07/2023):

...desalination to cloud seeding and growth management, are the best ways to solve the West’s water crisis...​

"Conditions on the drying Colorado River are worsening faster than expected. States can’t agree on how to divide water cuts. Native American officials say they’re still largely shut out from the bargaining table and murmurs of a dystopian 'water war" scenario now punctuate the conversations.

The crisis is over a century in the making and water experts have been ringing alarm bells for decades. Now government officials have weeks or months, not years, to find ways to save massive amounts of water.

At risk are the country’s two largest reservoirs — lakes Powell and Mead — both of which are losing water. Levels could drop so low this year that Glen Canyon and Hoover dams would no longer be able to generate electricity for millions of people. By the end of next year, Powell’s water level could fall so low that its dam will only be able to send smaller quantities of water downstream to Arizona, California and Nevada.

Federal officials need the seven states in the Colorado River Basin to save at least 2 million acre-feet but water managers now acknowledge that number might need to be three times higher, enough to bury the entire state of Rhode Island under more than seven feet of water.


And that’s just so the basin can survive long enough to plan for the years ahead. Nobody wants to be the one responsible for turning down — or off — taps to farmers, ranchers, companies or even major cities."

...
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inertia

Super Member
I've read where a lot of the water has been allowed to flow into the ocean....I don't remember why, perhaps to save some fish species...
If I run across the article I'll post it.

Town loses its access to water stores (New York Times, Jack Healy)

"Rio Verde, AZ >> Joe McCue thought he had found a desert paradise when he bought one of the new stucco houses sprouting in the granite foothills of Rio Verde, Arizona. There were good schools, mountain views and cactus-spangled hiking trails out of the back door.

Then the water got cut off.

Earlier this month, the community's longtime water supplier, the neighboring city of Scottsdale, turned off the tap for Rio Verde Foothills, blaming a grinding drought that is threatening the future of the West. Scottsdale said it had to focus on conserving water for its own residents, and could no longer sell water to roughly 500 to 700 homes - or around 1,000 people. That meant the unincorporated swath of $500,000 stucco houses, mansions and horse ranches outside Scottsdale's borders would have to fend for itself and buy water from other suppliers - if homeowners could find t hem, and afford to pay much higher prices.

Almost overnight, the Rio Verde Foothills turned into a worst-case scenario of a hotter, drier climate, showing what happens when unregulated growth collides with shrinking water supplies."

...

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More? See CNN
 
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CrowCross

Super Member
Town loses its access to water stores (New York Times, Jack Healy)

"Rio Verde, AZ >> Joe McCue thought he had found a desert paradise when he bought one of the new stucco houses sprouting in the granite foothills of Rio Verde, Arizona. There were good schools, mountain views and cactus-spangled hiking trails out of the back door.

Then the water got cut off.

Earlier this month, the community's longtime water supplier, the neighboring city of Scottsdale, turned off the tap for Rio Verde Foothills, blaming a grinding drought that is threatening the future of the West. Scottsdale said it had to focus on conserving water for its own residents, and could no longer sell water to roughly 500 to 700 homes - or around 1,000 people. That meant the unincorporated swath of $500,000 stucco houses, mansions and horse ranches outside Scottsdale's borders would have to fend for itself and buy water from other suppliers - if homeowners could find t hem, and afford to pay much higher prices.

Almost overnight, teh Rio Verde Foothills turned into a worst-case scenario of a hotter, drier climate, showing what happens when unregulated growth collides with shrinking water supplies."

...

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More? See CNN
I have seen several articles on this topic.

From what I hear Phoenix has millions..billions??? of gallons of water stored under it. Don't know if this is true.
 

inertia

Super Member
I have seen several articles on this topic.

From what I hear Phoenix has millions..billions??? of gallons of water stored under it. Don't know if this is true.

This presents another issue that Phoenix must contend with. Developers are tapping into their aquifers faster than they can refill them. They have been drawing down the water table for a while and there will be a point where it will impacted from unsafe water at lower depths. Currently, they have enough supply for the foreseeable future.

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inertia

Super Member
A formerly sunken boat near what's left of Lake Meade, NV

A formerly Sunken Boat_Lake Meade_NV.png
Image Credit: John Locher, AP


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inertia

Super Member
Denver Post (AP): 01/31/2023

Flagstaff,Ariz. >> "Six Western states that rely on water from the Colorado River have agreed on a model to dramatically cut their use, months after the federal government called for action and an initial deadline passed.

California - with the largest allocation of water from the river - is the lone holdout.

The Colorado River and its tributaries pass through seven states and into Mexico, serving 40 million people and $5 billion-a-year agricultural industry. Some of the largest cities in the country - including Los Angeles, Phoenix, Denver and Las Vegas - two Mexican states, Native American tribes and others depend on the river that's been severely stressed by drought, demand and overuse."

..... > More [ Salt Lake Tribune ]

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