Lenny Lego

Neo

Member
What relationships between genomes of organisms would we *not* expect to see if they were created by a creator and not through an evolutionary process? And why, given some characteristics of that creator?
If the creator is a creative intelligence, then we should expect similarities and differences within each organism. There are no limitations to .
Not intelligent at all. The more grandchildren you have the more copies of your genes (and the mutations they carry) are passed on to future generations.

After that beneficial mutations increase like compound interest. The more copies there are in the population today, the more copies there will be in future generations.
Where is this genetic information coming from to be passed on to future generations?
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Yes, as you said humans are born via other humans.

Is there any observational evidence where humans were born via something other than humans?
There is zero evidence of humans being born to anything other than humans.
ZERO.
Alas, creationism requires that this NOT be the case. Creationism requires that humans give birth to rabbits, and cows give birth to humans.
Creationism requires magic.
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
OK, it's your claim...show me...and the others...how mutations add up and form new traits. If you can't then please retract your statement.
One mutation plus one mutation, equals two mutations.
Add another mutation, and you have three mutations.
This has been explained to you repeatedly on the old boards
 

Neo

Member
There is zero evidence of humans being born to anything other than humans.
ZERO.
Alas, creationism requires that this NOT be the case. Creationism requires that humans give birth to rabbits, and cows give birth to humans.
Creationism requires

There is zero evidence of humans being born to anything other than humans.
ZERO.
Alas, creationism requires that this NOT be the case. Creationism requires that humans give birth to rabbits, and cows give birth to humans.
Creationism requires magic.
Is there a beginning to humans, or do humans exist for eternity into the past?
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
That is a pretty intelligent and prophetic filter to be able to know which mutations will be beneficial to pass on and which mutations are deleterious to remove. This must be why most organisms have symmetry. Natural selection knows what to keep and what to remove. Interesting, natural selection is pretty intelligent!
You think environmental selective pressure has awareness?
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Is there a beginning to humans, or do humans exist for eternity into the past?
There is a definite beginning.
There was a time when there were no humans.
And then there were humans.
The first humans (Homo Erectus) appear about two million years ago.
They are not our species. But they are in the genus Homo. So they are human.
Our own species (Homo Sapiens Sapiens) appears about three hundred thousand years ago.
 

Neo

Member
There is a definite beginning.
There was a time when there were no humans.
And then there were humans.
The first humans (Homo Erectus) appear about two million years ago.
They are not our species. But they are in the genus Homo. So they are human.
Our own species (Homo Sapiens Sapiens) appears about three hundred thousand years ago.
Ok, let's go with this story. Then what occurred before this?
 

Neo

Member
No. But your post indicates that you DO.
It is the conclusion that had to be made with what the poster said. I was shocked to come to that conclusion. That's why I posted it. I don't agree with what he said about natural selection. He stated that natural selection filters out the non beneficial mutations and maintains the beneficial mutations. By what he said, natural selection was not only intelligent, but also prophetic. Pretty amazing!
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Ok, let's go with this story. Then what occurred before this?
Pretty much all of history.
You might want to narrow it down a bit.
A small planet crashed into the earth, and the debris of that crash became the moon.
There were ice ages. Super-continents formed and broke up.
There were at least six major mass extinction events.
 

Neo

Member
Pretty much all of history.
You might want to narrow it down a bit.
A small planet crashed into the earth, and the debris of that crash became the moon.
There were ice ages. Super-continents formed and broke up.
There were at least six major mass extinction events.
That's an interesting story. Where did this matter come from to create the small planet that crashed into the earth?
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
It is the conclusion that had to be made with what the poster said. I was shocked to come to that conclusion. That's why I posted it. I don't agree with what he said about natural selection. He stated that natural selection filters out the non beneficial mutations and maintains the beneficial mutations. By what he said, natural selection was not only intelligent, but also prophetic. Pretty amazing!
Except he never said either thing.
YOU made it up.
YOU made up a false claim to attribute to someone else.
What does this say about you?
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
That's an interesting story. Where did this matter come from to create the small planet that crashed into the earth?
Excuse me?
It came from a star. Or rather several stars.
Not that this has anything to do with evolution.
If you want to discuss planet formation, there is a thread in the astronomy forum.
 

Temujin

Well-known member
That is a pretty intelligent and prophetic filter to be able to know which mutations will be beneficial to pass on and which mutations are deleterious to remove. This must be why most organisms have symmetry. Natural selection knows what to keep and what to remove. Interesting, natural selection is pretty intelligent!
Not really. If a mutation is beneficial, then the organism will on average breed slightly more successfully than one without the mutation. Over time the mutation will become fixed in the population. Neutral mutations also build up, there being no reason why they should be removed. This results in a population with plenty of phenotypes giving successive mutations more scope. Evolutionary algorithms in computing use the same principle. They are very effective at optimising solutions to complex problems.
 
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