Like a toddler exploring its crib

Septextura

Active member

After entering interstellar space, Voyager 2 discovered a wall of fire enclosing the heliosphere. It protects the solar system from 70% of the cosmic radiation. Seems convenient for life on earth this kinda happened accidentally by chance. How lucky, huh.
 

Temujin

Active member

After entering interstellar space, Voyager 2 discovered a wall of fire enclosing the heliosphere. It protects the solar system from 70% of the cosmic radiation. Seems convenient for life on earth this kinda happened accidentally by chance. How lucky, huh.
Not really. If it wasn't there, we wouldn't be here to discover it.

It takes a special kind of mind to believe that the vast universe, most of which is utterly inhospitable to our form of life, was created specially for us, and to think that the quirks of nature that make our life possible are proof of that.
 

Temujin

Active member
Merely proves my point.
Then maybe I was reading more into your point than was really there. Yes we are lucky because intelligent life is incredibly rare, possibly unique to our planet. This is a strong argument against God, or at least the anthropomorphic version of gods found in most human religions such as Christianity.
 

Septextura

Active member
Then maybe I was reading more into your point than was really there. Yes we are lucky because intelligent life is incredibly rare, possibly unique to our planet. This is a strong argument against God, or at least the anthropomorphic version of gods found in most human religions such as Christianity.

Aliens?
 

Temujin

Active member
What about them? There are projected to be 11 billion habitable earth-like planets in our galaxy. We have discovered 55 of them, the nearest being 12 light years away. There is also a reasonable possibility that life is or was present on other planets and planetary moons in our solar system. We know that life originated on earth within half a billion years of its formation. Life at the single cell level is probably relatively common in the universe. The trick is multi-cellular life. That may well be very rare indeed. We are certainly not aware of any intelligent, presumably multi-cellular aliens, but that just shows that they are rare, not absent. The existence of alien intelligence will have to wait for further evidence, which may never emerge.
 

Septextura

Active member
The existence of alien intelligence will have to wait for further evidence, which may never emerge.

Oh dear. Our friend Richard Dawkins believes in panspermia. He probably checks the SETI website every day before going to be bed to make sure we made contact.
 

Temujin

Active member
Oh dear. Our friend Richard Dawkins believes in panspermia. He probably checks the SETI website every day before going to be bed to make sure we made contact.
So what? There are people who believe idiotic things all over the place. Some can be found on this very website. The notion that organic materials "seeded" life on this planet is unproven but scientifically possible, particularly as amino acids have been found on asteroids. SETI is a long shot, but is more valuable in promoting the idea that aliens may exist than in any hope of finding them.

I ask again, why did you ask the question?
 

The Pixie

Member
Oh dear. Our friend Richard Dawkins believes in panspermia. He probably checks the SETI website every day before going to be bed to make sure we made contact.
That is not true. Dawkins' own words, from here.

And so for example when he asked me whether I could, under any circumstances at all, think of how life on Earth could have been intelligently designed, or could there ever be life that was intelligently designed, I bent over backwards to think, well, you know, can I think of an extreme condition in which it might be intelligently designed? And I thought of Francis Crick’s tongue-in-cheek suggestion that life on Earth had been seeded by directed panspermia, by some extraterrestrial intelligence, seeding the Earth with bacterial life, and this sort of bending over backwards to think of a way in which intelligent life might under some circumstances, you know, what’s the best case I could make for intelligent life, and this was seized upon: “Dawkins believes in little green men!” This was a thoroughly dishonest tactic. Now, if anybody’s listening who’s ever invited to make a film by this man Mathis, he’s dishonest. Don’t do it.
 

Whateverman

Active member

After entering interstellar space, Voyager 2 discovered a wall of fire enclosing the heliosphere. It protects the solar system from 70% of the cosmic radiation. Seems convenient for life on earth this kinda happened accidentally by chance. How lucky, huh.
Do you know what the anthropic principle is? If not, spend a little time exploring the idea, because it provides a plausible explanation for why we appear to exist in a place that's suited to that existence. I honestly don't mean to be condescending, but go beyond merely looking it up.

A classic example of the weak anthropic principle is a little brine shrimp (et al) born in a tidal pool. To the shrimp, the pool looks perfectly designed for him her, but to someone who understand tides and oceans, the design is obviously illusory.
 
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