Lutherans Are The Biggest Boozers Among Protestant Christians, Poll Finds

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
The percentage of Lutherans polled who said they drink far outpaced other those of other denominations at 76 percent'

What most of the other 24% don't admit it?

The poll, released Tuesday, showed Lutherans are more likely than members of most other Protestant denominations to admit to or embrace drinking alcohol. The percentage of Lutherans polled who admitted to drinking far outpaced other those of other denominations at 76 percent, followed by 62 percent of Methodists, 43 percent of nondenominational churchgoers, 33 percent of Baptists, and 23 percent of Pentecostals/Assemblies of God.

As Dr. Mark U. Edwards, Jr. notes, “Luther had his way” and the “peasants were brutally suppressed.” Estimates of those slaughtered range from 100,000 to 300,000.


What would happen to a Luteran Clergy if he preached against alcohol?
 

Reepicheep

Well-known member
What is the most extreme alcohol consuming denomination?

I don't know. But if the answer isn't "Lutherans of German ancestry who were born in rural Saskatchewan", I'm sure we could give the winners a run for their money.

Incidentally, a group of us at church have started following the fine German tradition of going for Frühschoppen after our Sunday service. A great tradition, look it up.

As an aside: the 2022 Lutheran Church Canada Synodical Convention will be held here in Edmonton in two months time. I've been given the responsibility of purchasing the wine for the opening communion service. I can imagine no greater honour.

"It is better to think of church in the ale-house than to think of the ale-house in church". - Martin Luther
 

Tertiumquid

Well-known member
As Dr. Mark U. Edwards, Jr. notes, “Luther had his way” and the “peasants were brutally suppressed.” Estimates of those slaughtered range from 100,000 to 300,000.


What would happen to a Luteran Clergy if he preached against alcohol?
1. Frankly, I don't care about the booze, but I did send your Lutheran booze link to a friend letting him know that he would fit in at a Lutheran church.

2. I don't see the historical connection between alcohol and Luther's comments on the peasant's revolt.

3. Dr. Edwards I think passed away recently. He was an excellent scholar, you would do well to turn off CARM and get a few of his books. Track down particularly, Luther and the False Brethren.

4. As to the comment from Mark U. Edwards that "Luther had his way" and the "peasants were brutally suppressed." If all that is meant is that societal order was restored by suppressing the peasants, this would be consistent with Luther's thought that rebellion was to be met with force and containment. On the other hand, there is a sense in which Luther did not have his way, because the rulers did not distinguish between the seditious and innocent peasants as Luther requested they do.

It's a bit naive though to think somehow a person living in a more peaceful country, hundreds of years later, can actually determine the guilt of Luther's writings in the entire peasants revolt. How would a person write their criticisms if it was they who lived through 1524-1525? What would they say about the peasants while the peasants ransacked their houses, or killed their family members, and threatening the stability of the land? I would posit many the same people criticizing Luther would be the first to buy his book Against the Robbing and Murdering Mobs of Peasants.

I'd respond more, but It's almost noon where I am, so I need to decide what drink I'm going to be having. Seems like a martini would do the trick.
 
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Bonnie

Super Member
Hi Tert--this thread is in response to something Reepicherp wrote, tongue in cheek, on the SEP board, about averaging:


I jokingly asked where I could find that ale--but I too was speaking tongue in cheek, as I loathe beer and ale. I enjoy a glass of wine once in awhile, but that is all.
 

Beloved Daughter

Super Member
Hi Tert--this thread is in response to something Reepicherp wrote, tongue in cheek, on the SEP board, about averaging:


I jokingly asked where I could find that ale--but I too was speaking tongue in cheek, as I loathe beer and ale. I enjoy a glass of wine once in awhile, but that is all.
I'm very careful of alcoholic drinks. My Daddy, rest his soul, left this world from his own alcoholism.

My doctor doesn't seem to think I'm telling the truth when I tell him I have a glass of wine now and then. That means once or twice a year. I'm guessing folks like you and I are not normal. ❤️✝️
 

Bonnie

Super Member
I'm very careful of alcoholic drinks. My Daddy, rest his soul, left this world from his own alcoholism.

My doctor doesn't seem to think I'm telling the truth when I tell him I have a glass of wine now and then. That means once or twice a year. I'm guessing folks like you and I are not normal. ❤️✝️
Well, I have a glass a few days a week. Just one glass. Nothing more. Even Jesus drank, and His enemies called Him a drunkard. So, obviously, enjoying a glass of wine now and then is not a sin. It is abusing alcohol that is.
 

Tertiumquid

Well-known member
I'm very careful of alcoholic drinks. My Daddy, rest his soul, left this world from his own alcoholism.

My doctor doesn't seem to think I'm telling the truth when I tell him I have a glass of wine now and then. That means once or twice a year. I'm guessing folks like you and I are not normal. ❤️✝️
I've lost close family and friends to drugs and alcohol... and I've also lost friends and family to generally not taking care of themselves. A very sad example of this was an older overweight person in my church that was having a lot of knee pain. The church prayed for the person in corporate prayer. While the prayer was meaningful and God-glorifying, the other part of this should have been elder (or friends and family) intervening to help this person lose weight... because the excessive weight was one of the major factors making the knees hurt! Eventually this person lost a lot of mobility and died from a number of weight and general health complications. I've got a good Christian friend now going through the same weight / knee issue.

The older I get, the more I see, like Luther "that the strength of Scripture is this, that it is not changed into him who studies it, but that it transforms its lover into itself and its strengths." The gist is that the Scriptures is not the object of our interpretation, but we are the object as Scriptures interpret us. Food, drink, people, objects, health, children, jobs... anything... can be appreciated and loved to the glory of God, or it can be that which is abused and used for the remnant of sin that still dwells in us. Scripture reads us as we read it and points out those areas, maybe it's alcohol, maybe it's Dunkin Donuts!
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Ý
I don't know. But if the answer isn't "Lutherans of German ancestry who were born in rural Saskatchewan", I'm sure we could give the winners a run for their money.

Incidentally, a group of us at church have started following the fine German tradition of going for Frühschoppen after our Sunday service. A great tradition, look it up.

As an aside: the 2022 Lutheran Church Canada Synodical Convention will be held here in Edmonton in two months time. I've been given the responsibility of purchasing the wine for the opening communion service. I can imagine no greater honour.

"It is better to think of church in the ale-house than to think of the ale-house in church". - Martin Luther
We don't do that in our church. Some of us just go out to lunch after services, no alcoholic libations involved. But people in a lot of different churches do that, as well. :)
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
I've lost close family and friends to drugs and alcohol...

Slavery.

Drugs and alcohol own the user.

and I've also lost friends and family to generally not taking care of themselves. A very sad example of this was an older overweight person in my church that was having a lot of knee pain. The church prayed for the person in corporate prayer. While the prayer was meaningful and God-glorifying, the other part of this should have been elder (or friends and family) intervening to help this person lose weight... because the excessive weight was one of the major factors making the knees hurt! Eventually this person lost a lot of mobility and died from a number of weight and general health complications. I've got a good Christian friend now going through the same weight / knee issue.

The older I get, the more I see, like Luther "that the strength of Scripture is this, that it is not changed into him who studies it, but that it transforms its lover into itself and its strengths." The gist is that the Scriptures is not the object of our interpretation, but we are the object as Scriptures interpret us. Food, drink, people, objects, health, children, jobs... anything... can be appreciated and loved to the glory of God, or it can be that which is abused and used for the remnant of sin that still dwells in us. Scripture reads us as we read it and points out those areas, maybe it's alcohol, maybe it's Dunkin Donuts!
 

Nic

Well-known member
Beer drinkin' buddies?

What is the most extreme alcohol consuming denomination?
I would hardly call a beer extreme alcohol and if your other apparent emphasis is on Lutherans because more Lutherans imbibe than other protestant communities big deal. We also enjoy our coffee. If drinking to excess isn't the delimiter than you have no case. Some Lutherans are also guilty of consuming lutefisk and cigars but these things may disgust some, they are not sins. Perhaps you can post an sensational topic about the protestant denomination with the most extreme coffee snobs and quilt-makers?
Why not? I like to get to the bottom of these things and set the record straight.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
Alcohol use is not a sin.
As Dr. Mark U. Edwards, Jr. notes, “Luther had his way” and the “peasants were brutally suppressed.” Estimates of those slaughtered range from 100,000 to 300,000.
If you're not misrepresenting the author then he is not much of a historian.
What would happen to a Luteran Clergy if he preached against alcohol?
The use of alcohol is not a sin so it may be suggested that he study the Bible and spend more time in sermon preparation.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
I would hardly call a beer extreme alcohol and if your other apparent emphasis is on Lutherans because more Lutherans imbibe than other protestant communities big deal. We also enjoy our coffee. If drinking to excess isn't the delimiter than you have no case. Some Lutherans are also guilty of consuming lutefisk and cigars but these things may disgust some, they are not sins. Perhaps you can post an sensational topic about the protestant denomination with the most extreme coffee snobs and quilt-makers?
Why not? I like to get to the bottom of these things and set the record straight.
Lutefisk gets a bum rap.It just needs some hot sauce.
 
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Nic

Well-known member
Lutefisk gets a bum rap.It just needs some hot sauce.
I have never had nor seen it, but depending on initial investigation of aroma, appearance, texture and consistency, I am usually game to try things on their own and unadulterated. Hot sauce is a nice compliment to many foods. The two variations of hot sauce I am inclined to enjoy emphasize either vinegar or a fruit forward profile. 90% of the time i choose the vinegar option. In was going to order some online to try it, to my surprise, their is a producer here in TX, but the minimum order was ~$50, so I declined.
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
I have never had nor seen it, but depending on initial investigation of aroma, appearance, texture and consistency, I am usually game to try things on their own and unadulterated.
Yes, that is best! On the other hand, as a lousy cook I have found that hot sauce can make anything palatable.
Hot sauce is a nice compliment to many foods. The two variations of hot sauce I am inclined to enjoy emphasize either vinegar or a fruit forward profile. 90% of the time i choose the vinegar option. In was going to order some online to try it, to my surprise, their is a producer here in TX, but the minimum order was ~$50, so I declined.
Have you come across a guide which indicates which is which? Maybe you could do a Lutheran's guide to hot sauce?
 
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