Lutherans Are The Biggest Boozers Among Protestant Christians, Poll Finds

Nic

Well-known member
Yes, that is best! On the other hand, as a lousy cook I have found that hot sauce can make anything palatable.

Have you come across a guide which indicates which is which? Maybe you could do a Lutheran's guide to hot sauce?
Sometime acids do nicely whether citrus, vinegar or perhaps something else without the heat component.
I have not come across nor particularly sought out such a culinary guide. 🙂
Most of my preferences or tastes come by way of letting down my guard as to what I may normally try or do and experiment. I have a hunch I would not mind admitting defeat as a guest on the show Hot Ones. My senses have allowed me to detect vinegar in various sauces or condiments and I have enough history of association with that type of sauce, that I know fairly close as to what to expect from that in different cuisine. I tend to think before pleasure, at least for me at times, that it's about growing in familiarity and galvanized through repeated experience which leads to pleasure. I only know I enjoy some fruit forward varieties because I tried them and at times the result was good enough off the start to know I liked it immediately. Sometimes discovering that my appreciation grows beyond these initial encounters as well. Eg. I had some mango-ginger hot sauce that was delicious as is. I stir-fried something and had left the greasy hot sauce in the pan and had the thought, what if and why not? Cut to the chase, they were very, very good fried eggs. My brother's in-laws make hot sauces from scratch and are regarded as having a generous amount of heat. Anyway, if I prefer to dilute the sauce and I usually don't, I to do so with another sauce or food base of some doing. Even beer is a good option. My brother said his father-in-law tells him to add a bit of water to tone down the heat. Yuck. Water is tasteless and often a flavor subtracting addictive I tend to avoid using where almost anything is a better a option. I haven't had trouble eating those homemade sauces generously. I had a friend order and grow Carolina Reapers (derived from the dreaded ghost pepper) and made sauce. He threw it away including the plant. 😆 🤣 😂 I could of told him a better way to use those peppers. Usually you may poke a hole in the pepper with a pin and saute it in a sauce to add heat. You could also grill and burn the pepper just a bit while whole in a pan with a bit of oil, then poke your hole and steep in a broth or sauce. Adding the deglazed pepper renderings to the sauce or broth. The longer its in there, the hotter it gets. I think he used a molcajete. Lol Here's a couple of other salsa tips to try, add a small amount of olive oil, orange juice or something else to a salsa. The olive oil makes them so rich in flavor. A small addition of citrus or as suggested OJ, takes an ordinary red salsa and makes bloom very brightly and great on seafood or chicken. It generally doesn't take much and so less is more is usually my practice. Anyway, bon appétit! Knife 🔪 🍴 🍽
 
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BJ Bear

Well-known member
Sometime acids do nicely whether citrus, vinegar or perhaps something else without the heat component.
I have not come across nor particularly sought out such a culinary guide. 🙂
Most of my preferences or tastes come by way of letting down my guard as to what I may normally try or do and experiment. I have a hunch I would not mind admitting defeat as a guest on the show Hot Ones. My senses have allowed me to detect vinegar in various sauces or condiments and I have enough history of association with that type of sauce, that I know fairly close as to what to expect from that in different cuisine. I tend to think before pleasure, at least for me at times, that it's about growing in familiarity and galvanized through repeated experience which leads to pleasure. I only know I enjoy some fruit forward varieties because I tried them and at times the result was good enough off the start to know I liked it immediately. Sometimes discovering that my appreciation grows beyond these initial encounters as well. Eg. I had some mango-ginger hot sauce that was delicious as is. I stir-fried something and had left the greasy hot sauce in the pan and had the thought, what if and why not? Cut to the chase, they were very, very good fried eggs. My brother's in-laws make hot sauces from scratch and are regarded as having a generous amount of heat. Anyway, if I prefer to dilute the sauce and I usually don't, I to do so with another sauce or food base of some doing. Even beer is a good option. My brother said his father-in-law tells him to add a bit of water to tone down the heat. Yuck. Water is tasteless and often a flavor subtracting addictive I tend to avoid using where almost anything is a better a option. I haven't had trouble eating those homemade sauces generously. I had a friend order and grow Carolina Reapers (derived from the dreaded ghost pepper) and made sauce. He threw it away including the plant. 😆 🤣 😂 I could of told him a better way to use those peppers. Usually you may poke a hole in the pepper with a pin and saute it in a sauce to add heat. You could also grill and burn the pepper just a bit while whole in a pan with a bit of oil, then poke your hole and steep in a broth or sauce. Adding the deglazed pepper renderings to the sauce or broth. The longer its in there, the hotter it gets. I think he used a molcajete. Lol Here's a couple of other salsa tips to try, add a small amount of olive oil, orange juice or something else to a salsa. The olive oil makes them so rich in flavor. A small addition of citrus or as suggested OJ, takes an ordinary red salsa and makes bloom very brightly and great on seafood or chicken. It generally doesn't take much and so less is more is usually my practice. Anyway, bon appétit! Knife 🔪 🍴 🍽
Thanks! The fried egg comment was great. I do that type of thing also. The other info has given me some ideas for fellowship or the next potluck. :)
 

Bonnie

Super Member
I do enjoy a nice bourbon or rye from time to time.
I used to make my own schnapps. My husband didn't like it, but his mom and sister did. Obviously, they are people of discernment and taste....:) But it is a lot of work so I quit. Plus, I think I was liking it a little TOO much.

In the winter, we enjoy a cup of hot German mulled wine--glueh wein--it is wonderfully refreshing. If anyone would like the recipe, I can put it down in the Cooking/Food forum. :)
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Alcohol use is not a sin.

If you're not misrepresenting the author then he is not much of a historian.

The use of alcohol is not a sin so it may be suggested that he study the Bible and spend more time in sermon preparation.
The pastor would preach against the ABUSE of alcohol.
 

hn160

New Member
If you ever get to Pennsylvania, there is a good beer brewed in Pottsville called Yuengling. All their beers are good. Yuengling is the oldest brewery in the US. The company is expanding but they haven’t arrived in California.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
If you ever get to Pennsylvania, there is a good beer brewed in Pottsville called Yuengling. All their beers are good. Yuengling is the oldest brewery in the US. The company is expanding but they haven’t arrived in California.
I always thought that name sounded Chinese...:)
 

rakovsky

Well-known member
The Teetotaler/Prohibitionist movement was pretty high among Anglo-Americans like Methodists, as well as among the other Reformed churches, which use grape juice. I am going to guess that Methodists used to use wine but now use grape juice. That leaves the Lutherans and Episcopalians as the practically the only Protestants who still use wine, AFAIK, which they should use.

Normally I would have guessed that a state with a high Catholic population would have the highest alcohol consumption, like LA, MA, or NY, or else it would be a poor state like WV. But statistically, Wisconsin somehow has an extreme amount of alcohol consumption per person. I am not sure why, because I imagine it to be your normal rust belt Midwestern state, like Michigan and Minnesota. In any case, Wisconsin probably has a high German Lutheran population.

I am not particularly anti-alcohol myself, and I believe that the age limit needs to be lowered to 18, if they are going to send young men to war in a draft at that age.

All the best.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
The Teetotaler/Prohibitionist movement was pretty high among Anglo-Americans like Methodists, as well as among the other Reformed churches, which use grape juice. I am going to guess that Methodists used to use wine but now use grape juice. That leaves the Lutherans and Episcopalians as the practically the only Protestants who still use wine, AFAIK, which they should use.

Normally I would have guessed that a state with a high Catholic population would have the highest alcohol consumption, like LA, MA, or NY, or else it would be a poor state like WV. But statistically, Wisconsin somehow has an extreme amount of alcohol consumption per person. I am not sure why, because I imagine it to be your normal rust belt Midwestern state, like Michigan and Minnesota. In any case, Wisconsin probably has a high German Lutheran population.

I am not particularly anti-alcohol myself, and I believe that the age limit needs to be lowered to 18, if they are going to send young men to war in a draft at that age.

All the best.
Wisconsin brews a lot of beer. Maybe that is why. :)
 

BJ Bear

Well-known member
I am not particularly anti-alcohol myself, and I believe that the age limit needs to be lowered to 18, if they are going to send young men to war in a draft at that age.

All the best.
In today's secular U.S. those eighteen year olds can simply claim that they feel like they are twenty-one. :rolleyes:
 
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