Most Influential books in your personal life

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Brave New World.
Fahrenheit 451.
Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
The Hobbit.
Never Cry Wolf.
Frankenstein.
People of the Deer.
Little House in the Big Woods.
Dracula.
Tom Sawyer
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Brave New World.
Fahrenheit 451.
Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
The Hobbit.
Never Cry Wolf.
Frankenstein.
People of the Deer.
Little House in the Big Woods.
Dracula.
Tom Sawyer
Really? You read Little House on the Prairie? I read all of the Little House books when I was a girl. I also read Frankenstein when I was 13, and Never Cry Wolf in my late teens. Oh, and The Hobbit.
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Really? You read Little House on the Prairie? I read all of the Little House books when I was a girl. I also read Frankenstein when I was 13, and Never Cry Wolf in my late teens. Oh, and The Hobbit.
Posted march 20th
Yes. They were available at the place I grew up in. And I read them.
I was punished for reading them too.
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
Good grief, why? They are harmless books.
I grew up in a dumping ground for unwanted children.
The books were a display for visiting politicians, to show how wonderful the place was. We were not actually supposed to read them. Just sit in front of them and stare.
The staff assumed that we were all unable to read, and unable to be educated. We were defined as "garbage", and were treated accordingly.
We were made available to wealthy pedophiles, who used us as sexual toilets.
This was deemed to be the highest we could ever aspire to.
When we showed the ability to read, the staff called it "reading-like behaviour", and "playing with the books". They never let themselves consider the possibility that we could actually read.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
I grew up in a dumping ground for unwanted children.
The books were a display for visiting politicians, to show how wonderful the place was. We were not actually supposed to read them. Just sit in front of them and stare.
The staff assumed that we were all unable to read, and unable to be educated. We were defined as "garbage", and were treated accordingly.
We were made available to wealthy pedophiles, who used us as sexual toilets.
This was deemed to be the highest we could ever aspire to.
When we showed the ability to read, the staff called it "reading-like behaviour", and "playing with the books". They never let themselves consider the possibility that we could actually read.
That is dreadful. I am sorry you experienced that. How did you learn to read, if it was discouraged? In school?
 

Mr Laurier

Well-known member
That is dreadful. I am sorry you experienced that. How did you learn to read, if it was discouraged? In school?
My parents taught me early on. I was reading at age 4.
Then I was taken and dumped into the place where i grew up. from age 7 to age 14.
Reading became an act of defiance. My own resistance to the evil I was seeing/experiencing.
And reading also made me a better reader.
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
Goo

Good analysis...what are the odds of 10 different enzymes all evolving at the same exact time, to work together at the same time, in an organism, to support its life....?
Take it back a step and ask how many amino acids are involved in creating an enzyme?
There are approximately 1300 different enzymes found in the human cell.
Then all the hormones were created which required receptors to be created.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Take it back a step and ask how many amino acids are involved in creating an enzyme?
There are approximately 1300 different enzymes found in the human cell.
Then all the hormones were created which required receptors to be created.
Oh, wow, 1300? And what are the odds that all of those enzymes and receptors "evolved" at the exact same time, eh?
 

Bonnie

Super Member
My parents taught me early on. I was reading at age 4.
Then I was taken and dumped into the place where i grew up. from age 7 to age 14.
Reading became an act of defiance. My own resistance to the evil I was seeing/experiencing.
And reading also made me a better reader.
If you had been my son, even a foster child, I would have loved you and loved you....my husband, too.

Wow, age 4....I didn't learn to read until I started school at age six. But I learned quickly. I didn't start reading for fun until I was 8 and read a book entitled, Little Black, a Pony by Walter Farley. After that, I took off. In first and second grade, my parents took Weekly Reader for me during summer vacation, and made me sit down with them and read it to them, so I wouldn't lose my "edge." I kinda resented having to do "schoolwork" during the summer, but oh, well...once I started reading for fun, they stopped getting that magazine.
 

Dizerner

Well-known member
The book I got the most out of was The Normal Christian Life, by Watchman Nee. I practically have it memorized.

Next would be The Pursuit of God, by A. W. Tozer. And They Shall Expel Demons, by Derek Prince.
 

stiggy wiggy

Well-known member
Sickness unto Death by Soren Kierkegaard
Mere Christianity by CS Lewis
Orthodoxy by GK Chesterton
The Restitution of All Things by Andrew Jukes
The Unknown God by Alfred Noyes
Fearfully and Wonderfully Made by Phillip Yancey
Having and Being by Gabriel Marcel
The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Habit of Being by Flannery O'Connor
The Conscience of a Conservative by Barry Goldwater
 

Algor

Active member
These are the books that I most remember shaping how I thought about things and looked at things prior to the age of 18. The Jerusalem Bible belongs here, but the rest:

The Annotated Alice-Lewis Carroll ed by Martin Gardner
The Collected Works of George Bernard Shaw (2 vol. set, plays and prefaces, can't recall the editor)
Man's Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl
Black Like Me by Howard Griffen
The Gulag Archipelago by Alexandr Sozhenitsyn
The Silmarillion by JRR Tolkien
The Earthsea Trilogy (Wizard of Earthsea, Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore) by Ursula K LeGuin
The Narnia Series by CS Lewis
Gray's Anatomy (The anatomy book, weirdly enough....)
Watchers at the Pond by Franklin Russell
Animal Farm by George Orwell

oh, and Pagoo by Holling Clancy Holling
 
Last edited:
Many 'good' books but my top 5 (thus far) that have helped to influence my life and reasoning:
1- Modern Physics and Ancient Faith - Barr
2- When Einstein walked with Godel - Holt (however atheistic one might view Holt as it contains brilliant studies in mathematics some religion and many other fascinating topics)
3- The Science and the Good - (two Univ of VA Profs I'll post their names when i can get my book back) Great book on Morality... and how Science, no matter how deep we look, has not founded where we derive 'morality' from.
4- Becoming a Christian - Hossjer a great tool built on true scientific methodology (by a real scientist) that applies a step by step evidences that will help the most reasoned and logical minded to Christianity.
5- Until the End of Time - Greene (yeah i know yet another atheistic author but this soul is highly educated about our universe and actually draws parallels in faith and beliefs that religion holds- and actually admits in several key places that science needs faith...the facts just are not in yet) Still some fascinating topics for the physics minded.
 

Beloved

Member
Evidence that demands a verdict by JOSH McDowell

The Case for Christ by Lee Strobel

The Attributes of GOD by A.W. T0ZER

The Deity of Christ by John MacArthur

The Holy Spirit: Who He Is and What He Does by R.A. Torrey

The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit by R.A. Torrey

The Holiness of God by R.C. Sproul

Rays of Messiah's Glory by David Baron (1886)
( republished 2001)

Christ In The Old Testament by David Baron
 
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