NASA Artemis

inertia

Super Member
Hydrogen fuel leaks -

Although hydrogen is a great and abundant fuel, it is also the smallest element that leaks through the smallest nano-pores. Patience is needed to detect and seal leaks in NASA's new rocket.

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Second Attempt:

314605835_488444579985162_2373933739812716176_n.jpg


Credit: Lockheed Martin -"It takes up to 12 hours for NASA Ground Systems to roll the 5.75 million pound SLS rocket four miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launchpad, giving us opportunities for sights like this."
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inertia

Super Member
....

a quick photograph half way between the moon and Earth, on the third day of the first mission (Yes, Earth is a spheroidal. )

scheduled landing on Earth : December 11th, 2022


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Last edited:

The Pixie

Well-known member
Maybe the technical issues with hydrogen leaking have been solved. It's an ambitious program.
I am reading your posts in two different threads, and cannot help seeing the irony:

... All hydrogen tanks are regulated worldwide, and the regulations significantly restrict the leak rate to miniscule levels. The tanks are engineered using three separate layers. One layer is a plastic inner lining, the next is a sheet of carbon fiber, and finally an outer layer of glass fiber completes the seal.
If only the tanks used on rockets were as good as the ones in cars...
 

inertia

Super Member
I am reading your posts in two different threads, and cannot help seeing the irony:


If only the tanks used on rockets were as good as the ones in cars...

I had the same thought. In the lab, helium leak detection works well but finding H2 leaks is and always as been difficult since it is the lowest mass element on the periodic table. Liquid hydrogen storage in rockets requires a cryogenic vacuum jacket with a means to boil off evaporating hydrogen. Rockets also have to withstand a vibration environment while experiencing rapid changes in pressure and temperature.

- I have a text that I used as a reference titled "
Rocket Propulsion Elements"* and it has a table providing a large list variables for nozzle expansion requirements for liquid hydrogen and discusses their design parameters in detail. ( not trivial engineering )

Automobiles clearly don't have to engineer their tanks for rocket engine specifications. I'm confident that they have to perform in automobile crashes though.
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inertia

Super Member
....
314951659_10160902878543463_2699739731709925272_n.jpg
...
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Since the rocket plume image - vanished - I am replacing that image with this one:

Artemis1smokeplumes.jpg

Credit(s): "Featuring a massive fiery exhaust plume reminiscent of space shuttle launches — due to the use of
twin solid-propellant boosters — the overnight launch of the Space Launch System (SLS) for Artemis 1 dazzled
thousands of spaceflight enthusiasts who witnessed it live."
NASA/Joel Kowsky


I liked the previous image a lot more though.

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