Nietzsche said, "God is dead". Is that true?

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
Sorry, but 'dunno. Your question assumes He was alive in the first place. That He wasn't is a third logical possibility.
Don't waste my time trying to tell me I am making assumptions. It just doesn't work. I see you can't answer a yes or no question.

I also didn't ask for possibilities.
 

Whatsisface

Active member
Don't waste my time trying to tell me I am making assumptions. It just doesn't work. I see you can't answer a yes or no question.

I also didn't ask for possibilities.
But if there is another possibility, your question can't be a yes or no question. Do you deny the logical possibility that God didn't exist in the first place?
 

Cody

New member
But if there is another possibility, your question can't be a yes or no question. Do you deny the logical possibility that God didn't exist in the first place?
This is an interesting question. You are basically claiming that it is impossible for God to exist by suggesting that it is logically possible that he does not exist.
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
AN, explain your understanding of what Nietzsche meant by this, and whether he thought it was good, bad, or indifferent. You may illustrate your response with relevant quotes from his works.
I assumed some people can answer a yes or no question. Just not you.

I give tests. Your answer is blank so you get an F.
 

Cody

New member
Yes or no question. Show your evidence. Thanks in advance.
I will go ahead and answer the question. Nietzsche was wrong about God. He is not dead. His influence is still seen in the world today and atheists have completely failed to prevent the spread of the gospel.
 

Whatsisface

Active member
This is an interesting question. You are basically claiming that it is impossible for God to exist by suggesting that it is logically possible that he does not exist.
No, not at all. AN's question is, is God dead, which assumes he was alive in the first place. So we have two logical possibilities here in the context of the question, God is still alive, or God was alive but is now dead.

But this leaves the logical space that God was not alive in the first place. That's all I'm saying, so the question isn't a yes or no question.
 

Cody

New member
No, not at all. AN's question is, is God dead, which assumes he was alive in the first place. So we have two logical possibilities here in the context of the question, God is still alive, or God was alive but is now dead.

But this leaves the logical space that God was not alive in the first place. That's all I'm saying, so the question isn't a yes or no question.

I was thinking in terms of the ontological argument. If one states that it is possible that God does not exist in a possible world, then he does not exist in any of them (including the actual one). Therefore, saying that it is possible that God does not exist is the same as saying that it is impossible for him to exist. In any case, I think there are only two options here. Either it is possible that God exists or it is impossible. That said, I guess this is a little different than what Nietzsche meant went he said "God is dead."
 

treeplanter

Active member
What Nietzsche meant is that in our ignorance, the human race created God, and that in our subsequent acquisition of knowledge, God has been rendered obsolete - thus, in effect, we have "killed" God

Was Nietzsche correct?
Yes AND no

We are well on our way to being rid of God and all of it's unwanted baggage, but Nietzsche may have jumped the gun a bit when he declared God dead and buried

Nietzsche, I'm afraid, may have overestimated man
What I always say is - never underestimate the stupidity of man
Human beings are incredibly stupid, especially when gathered in numbers

That is the cynic in me talking
The idealist in me remains convinced that human beings mean well and are essentially good and decent at heart

Stupid, yes, but ultimately well intentioned...
 
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Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
I laugh at atheeists who are avid pro-deathers for the most part. They all know I use technology to understand abortion and a heart monitor shows when the baby is dead before extraction in pieces.
 

Whatsisface

Active member
I was thinking in terms of the ontological argument. If one states that it is possible that God does not exist in a possible world, then he does not exist in any of them (including the actual one). Therefore, saying that it is possible that God does not exist is the same as saying that it is impossible for him to exist. In any case, I think there are only two options here. Either it is possible that God exists or it is impossible. That said, I guess this is a little different than what Nietzsche meant went he said "God is dead."
OK.
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
But if there is another possibility, your question can't be a yes or no question. Do you deny the logical possibility that God didn't exist in the first place?\\\

So you can't answer

You are also totally wrong when you say it can't be a yes or no question.

You get an F on the question and we know you have no evidence,
 

Whatsisface

Active member

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
After the age of 44, Nietzsche lived the remaining 11 years of his life with his mommy taking care of him after losing the battle and hosting demons. Atheists are not prepared to discuss demons
 

Authentic Nouveau

Well-known member
I will go ahead and answer the question. Nietzsche was wrong about God. He is not dead. His influence is still seen in the world today and atheists have completely failed to prevent the spread of the gospel.
The moment Frederick died he encountered God and is no longer an atheist.
 
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