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Beloved Daughter

Well-known member
J.I Packer was a giant in the field of theology. His book Knowing God is considered required reading at many seminaries. He was part of the Anglican Church Canada until they adopted a non scriptural view of sexuality. He literally turned in his papers.

J. I. Packer - Wikipedia

When I read Knowing God, I was stunned by the depth of knowledge he presented. It changed my life for the better.


God speed ✝️
 

HillsboroMom

Active member
I grew up Lutheran, and in fact went to a Lutheran seminary for 3 years. I joined an Episcopal Church in 2008 or 2009. My family is currently "between churches" ... long story ... but I have been a member at that church longer than any other church.
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
Good question. I feel pretty confident there are still a few members. I will tell you that I was greatly influenced by the book Knowing God, by J.I.Packer. I was saddened by his death.

God Speed

I used to frequent used bookstores, and loved to check out the religion section.
Anytime I saw a copy of "Mere Christianity" (Lewis) or "Knowing God" (Packer), especially for 50 cents, I would pick up a copy. Great to give to people.

"Knowing God" is a book about the attributes of God.
God is more than just "love".
He is Holy, Just, wrathful, merciful, jealous, etc. etc. etc.
And Packer devotes a chapter to each attribute.

I'm a Baptist, btw... But I still have my mom's BCP.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
I grew up Lutheran, and in fact went to a Lutheran seminary for 3 years. I joined an Episcopal Church in 2008 or 2009. My family is currently "between churches" ... long story ... but I have been a member at that church longer than any other church.
You must have gone to an ELCA seminary. That church is extremely liberal, as is the Episcopal Church, except one or two of the more conservative branches.
 

HillsboroMom

Active member
You must have gone to an ELCA seminary. That church is extremely liberal, as is the Episcopal Church, except one or two of the more conservative branches.
Yes, it was. I wouldn't call it "extremely" liberal. I'd say it's left of center, for sure, but it's significantly more conservative than, say, UCC, which we affectionately called "Unitarians Considering Christ."

I was heartbroken when the so-called continuing church split off from the ELCA and decided to make their own church, rather than join the LCMS. I would have rather they joined the LCMS, which is theologically solid and would have welcomed them (I think) with open arms. There's already enough division. I'd rather see new alliances made rather than further divisions. But I was already with the Episcopalians by then.
 
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