Order Salutis

civic

Well-known member
Foreknowledge: God’s knowing (in this sense) prior to salvation those who would be saved.

Predestination: God’s choosing before time all who would be saved.

Election: God’s choosing of all who would be saved.

Regeneration: God’s renewing of one’s life (not physically, but as opposed to the spiritual death caused by sin) (Titus 3:5).

Evangelism: The communication of the gospel by which one can be saved (Matthew 28:19).

Faith: Belief and trust in the message of the gospel (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Conversion: One’s turning to God based on the gospel (Acts 26:18).

Perseverance: One’s continued true belief—remaining in the state of salvation (Jude 1:24).

Repentance: Changing one’s mind from rejection of Christ to faith in Christ (Acts 26:20).

Justification: God’s freeing of one from the penalty of sin—the pronouncement of "not guilty" on a sinner (Romans 5:9).

Sanctification: God’s separation of one from the lure of sin (2 Timothy 2:21).

Glorification: God’s final removal of all sin from the life and presence of one (in the eternal state) (Romans 8:18; 2 Corinthians 4:17).

The debate over ordo salutis is most keenly developed between the Reformed and Arminian systems. In the Reformed tradition, the ordo salutis is election / predestination, followed by evangelism, regeneration, conversion, justification, sanctification, and glorification. In the Arminian camp, the ordo salutis is evangelism, followed by faith / election, repentance, regeneration, justification, perseverance, and glorification. These stages may have various distinctions that are not represented here but serve to show the basic differences between the two systems. It should be noted that these need not be conceived as chronological steps - many of these stages are seen as distinctions within a single process that all (in one way or another) depend upon the work of God.

It is important to realize that the differences are much more than mere labels. One’s ordo salutis has as much to do with the cause(s) of salvation itself as it does with salvation stages . For example, the Reformed position has faith as an effect of election rather than a cause of it (as the Arminians have it). Thus, there is a sense in which a person is saved in order to have faith. Where, then, should blame be laid if a person does not believe? The Arminian position has the believer responsible for whether or not God saves him, and thus a person must persevere to the end before he can be assured of salvation. What does this say about a believer’s security? These and many other questions are dependent upon the ordo salutis for their answers, and it is thus important that a believer understands from which perspective those answers are given. got?

hope this helps !!!
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Foreknowledge: God’s knowing (in this sense) prior to salvation those who would be saved.

Predestination: God’s choosing before time all who would be saved.

Election: God’s choosing of all who would be saved.

Regeneration: God’s renewing of one’s life (not physically, but as opposed to the spiritual death caused by sin) (Titus 3:5).

Evangelism: The communication of the gospel by which one can be saved (Matthew 28:19).

Faith: Belief and trust in the message of the gospel (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Conversion: One’s turning to God based on the gospel (Acts 26:18).

Perseverance: One’s continued true belief—remaining in the state of salvation (Jude 1:24).

Repentance: Changing one’s mind from rejection of Christ to faith in Christ (Acts 26:20).

Justification: God’s freeing of one from the penalty of sin—the pronouncement of "not guilty" on a sinner (Romans 5:9).

Sanctification: God’s separation of one from the lure of sin (2 Timothy 2:21).

Glorification: God’s final removal of all sin from the life and presence of one (in the eternal state) (Romans 8:18; 2 Corinthians 4:17).

The debate over ordo salutis is most keenly developed between the Reformed and Arminian systems. In the Reformed tradition, the ordo salutis is election / predestination, followed by evangelism, regeneration, conversion, justification, sanctification, and glorification. In the Arminian camp, the ordo salutis is evangelism, followed by faith / election, repentance, regeneration, justification, perseverance, and glorification. These stages may have various distinctions that are not represented here but serve to show the basic differences between the two systems. It should be noted that these need not be conceived as chronological steps - many of these stages are seen as distinctions within a single process that all (in one way or another) depend upon the work of God.

It is important to realize that the differences are much more than mere labels. One’s ordo salutis has as much to do with the cause(s) of salvation itself as it does with salvation stages . For example, the Reformed position has faith as an effect of election rather than a cause of it (as the Arminians have it). Thus, there is a sense in which a person is saved in order to have faith. Where, then, should blame be laid if a person does not believe? The Arminian position has the believer responsible for whether or not God saves him, and thus a person must persevere to the end before he can be assured of salvation. What does this say about a believer’s security? These and many other questions are dependent upon the ordo salutis for their answers, and it is thus important that a believer understands from which perspective those answers are given. got?

hope this helps !!!
I think we can have the Order tweaked a little differently and be okay; as we believe Arminians and Calvinists are Saved no matter their concept of the Logical Order. Having these elements is more important to your Salvation than getting the Logical Order right. Well, at least the elements which share the Temporal Order, IE Glorification doesn't share the Temporal Order with the elements involved in our Justification...
 
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civic

Well-known member
To be consistent with your theology, would not it rather state:
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
Do the non elect get saved in the end ? yes or no

BTW- no one knows who the elect are when evangelizing which is why it goes out to all and the Lord does the saving. Our job is to share the gospel message and let God doe the saving.

hope this helps !!!
 

civic

Well-known member
To be consistent with your theology, would not it rather state:
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
are the ones who end up in hell, the same one who reject the gospel ?

by osmosis they are the non elect and those who are not in hell are the elect.
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
Do the non elect get saved in the end ? yes or no

BTW- no one knows who the elect are when evangelizing which is why it goes out to all and the Lord does the saving. Our job is to share the gospel message and let God doe the saving.

hope this helps !!!
are the ones who end up in hell, the same one who reject the gospel ?

by osmosis they are the non elect and those who are not in hell are the elect.
Where is my statement not consistent with your theology?
To be consistent with your theology, would not it rather state:
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Foreknowledge: God’s knowing (in this sense) prior to salvation those who would be saved.

Predestination: God’s choosing before time all who would be saved.

Election: God’s choosing of all who would be saved.

Regeneration: God’s renewing of one’s life (not physically, but as opposed to the spiritual death caused by sin) (Titus 3:5).

Evangelism: The communication of the gospel by which one can be saved (Matthew 28:19).

Faith: Belief and trust in the message of the gospel (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Conversion: One’s turning to God based on the gospel (Acts 26:18).

Perseverance: One’s continued true belief—remaining in the state of salvation (Jude 1:24).

Repentance: Changing one’s mind from rejection of Christ to faith in Christ (Acts 26:20).

Justification: God’s freeing of one from the penalty of sin—the pronouncement of "not guilty" on a sinner (Romans 5:9).

Sanctification: God’s separation of one from the lure of sin (2 Timothy 2:21).

Glorification: God’s final removal of all sin from the life and presence of one (in the eternal state) (Romans 8:18; 2 Corinthians 4:17).

hope this helps !!!
Tweak #1 - Since I like Covenant Theology, I'd start with God's Decree; because of God's eternal Covenant with himself to Save his People...
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
What makes the gospel "effective"?
According to OP's theology; the following makes the gospel "effective"
Predestination: God’s choosing before time all who would be saved.
Election: God’s choosing of all who would be saved.
....
What makes my statement inconsistent with OP's theology?
To be consistent with your theology, would not it rather state:
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
 

ReverendRV

Well-known member
According to OP's theology; the following makes the gospel "effective"
Predestination: God’s choosing before time all who would be saved.
Election: God’s choosing of all who would be saved.
....
What makes my statement inconsistent with OP's theology?
To be consistent with your theology, would not it rather state:
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
I thought the OP is credited to Got Questions?
 

civic

Well-known member
What does that have to with my statement being inconsistent with OP's theology?
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
Is the gospel effective to the non elect who will not accept the gospel ? Yes or no
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
Is the gospel effective to the non elect who will not accept the gospel ? Yes or no
You agree then that my statement is consistent with your theology?
Evangelism: The communication of the gospel effective to only the elect.
 
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civic

Well-known member
Should Election precede Predestination?
I believe Predestination is the category that contains the subcategory of election/reprobation. Paul uses predestined and elect as synonyms in Romans 8:30-33. Election refers specifically to those God will save whereas predestination can refer to both the elect and the reprobate ( Acts 2:23; 4:27-28).

Acts 2:23
He was delivered up by God's set plan and foreknowledge, and you, by the hands of the lawless, put Him to death by nailing Him to the cross.

Some translations have predetermined plan or predestined above instead of set plan.

Acts 4:27-28
for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel, to do whatever your hand and your plan had predestined to take place.

hope this helps !!!
 

SovereignGrace

Well-known member
I believe Predestination is the category that contains the subcategory of election/reprobation. Paul uses predestined and elect as synonyms in Romans 8:30-33. Election refers specifically to those God will save whereas predestination can refer to both the elect and the reprobate ( Acts 2:23; 4:27-28).

Acts 2:23
He was delivered up by God's set plan and foreknowledge, and you, by the hands of the lawless, put Him to death by nailing Him to the cross.

Some translations have predetermined plan or predestined above instead of set plan.

Acts 4:27-28
for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel, to do whatever your hand and your plan had predestined to take place.

hope this helps !!!
Actually, those who God has predestined unto salvation are those He first elected. Logically, election precedes predestination in Ordo Salutis.
 
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