Parable of the unforgiving servant

valtteri21

Member
Does this parable mean we can lose our salvation:
- the servant is forgiven
- the servant doesn’t forgive others
- the servant is send to the torturers as punishment and loses the forgiveness
- Jesus says he will do this to us if we don’t forgive
 

squirrelyguy

Well-known member
Does this parable mean we can lose our salvation:
- the servant is forgiven
- the servant doesn’t forgive others
- the servant is send to the torturers as punishment and loses the forgiveness
- Jesus says he will do this to us if we don’t forgive
This is why I have as my tagline: "If your eschatology is off, your soteriology is almost guaranteed to be off."

I think there is a lot of tension in Scripture between eternal security and the warnings against falling away, and this tension cannot be neatly resolved by a strict binary view of the afterlife (either you're saved or not, either you go to heaven or hell, and your eternal destiny is fixed once you die). That's why a robust, fully informed premillennialism is helpful...for resolving dilemmas like the one presented in this parable.

What if the punishment that is spoken of in this parable is being excluded from the kingdom of God that Jesus sets up on the earth at His return? There's quite a bit of Scriptural support for a literal earthly kingdom to close out the final thousand years of world history, and there's also quite a bit of Scripture to support the idea that there will be Christians excluded from the kingdom along with unbelievers. But if it's only this millennial kingdom in view here, then that leaves open the possibility that the eternal destiny of the unforgiving servant might still be a blessed one, albeit in the eternal state after the final judgment.
 
G

guest1

Guest
If a person looks up the meaning of the word eternal and the word life and defines them we can then put those words together as scripture does and understand it’s meaning.

Jesus said in John that He gives His sheep eternal life and no one or no thing can remove, take away or snatch a sheep away from His or the Fathers hands. They are eternally secure in Him. Jesus and the Apostles teach us it’s our present possession and the down payment of the in dwelling Holy Spirit is our guarantee of our future inheritance.

hope this helps !!!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

ReverendRV

Well-known member
Read this first, then follow my conversation after that...

 
Last edited:

CrowCross

Super Member
Using this verse in this way...loss of salvation... implies that you can earn your way out of hell.

"In anger his master turned him over to the jailers to be tortured, until he should repay all that he owed".
 

squirrelyguy

Well-known member
Maybe this would be helpful for some.

Elsewhere in Matthew's Gospel, Jesus speaks of God's forgiveness in this way: "Anyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man, it will be forgiven him; but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit, it will not be forgiven him, either in this age or in the age to come." (12:32) Here we see that Jesus describes God's forgiveness as being available in both ages (this one + the age to come), and suggests that some people might find His forgiveness in the next age but not in this one, and that some others (namely, those who speak against the Holy Spirit) will not find God's forgiveness in either age. The mere fact that Jesus deems it necessary to differentiate between the two ages suggests that it's possible for people to be forgiven in one but not in the other.

The question concerning the parable of the unforgiving servant is this: in which age do the events of this parable take place? If we suppose that the time when the servant is hauled off to the torturers is "the age to come", then that would seem to rule out his eternal salvation. But if the time refers to "this age", then could it be possible that once he "repays the debt in full", he will find eternal forgiveness?

I tend to view the future millennial kingdom to be an intermediate state between the two ages.
 
Top