Philippians 2:12-13... What does it mean?

armylngst

Well-known member
That is the craziest and weirdest interpretation of “work out” and “fear and trembling” that anyone could have imagined. The expression “work out” is elsewhere used in the Bible in this context:

Judges 19:

15 And they turned aside thither, to go in and to lodge in Gibeah: and when he went in, he sat him down in a street of the city: for there was no man that took them into his house to lodging.
16 And, behold, there came an old man from his work out of the field at even, which was also of mount Ephraim; and he sojourned in Gibeah: but the men of the place were Benjamites.
17 And when he had lifted up his eyes, he saw a wayfaring man in the street of the city: and the old man said, Whither goest thou? and whence comest thou?


“Work out” in this context is used to mean doing manual labor in agricultural land. He wasn’t “straightening his armour” LOL! That expression is not used elsewhere in the Bible, but “work” by itself, with the same meaning, is used much in the Bible:
Work out isn't even there. "16 And behold, an old man was coming from his work in the field at evening. The man was from the hill country of Ephraim, and he was sojourning in Gibeah. The men of the place were Benjamites." (ESV) So you are, as usual, mishandling scripture. The understanding of the verse as you wrote it is the same as the ESV. He came from out of the field. What was he doing there, working. I have no idea how that can be connected to "work out your salvation". Work it out.
Romans 2:

9 Tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that doeth evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Gentile;
10 But glory, honour, and peace, to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Gentile:
11 For there is no respect of persons with God.

Colossians 1:

9 For this cause we also, since the day we heard it, do not cease to pray for you, and to desire that ye might be filled with the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual understanding;
10 That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God;
11 Strengthened with all might, according to his glorious power, unto all patience and longsuffering with joyfulness;
The above means nothing because you couldn't even support your first premise. The part where you say that "work out" isn't present anywhere else in scripture is important, because apparently, this is the only place it shows up in scripture.
As far as “fear and trembling” goes, that is also used elsewhere in the Bible, with a meaning nothing resembling what he has associated with it:

1 Corinthians 2:

3 And I was with you in weakness, and in fear, and in much trembling.
I guess he was afraid of public speaking? (Which would be exactly the kind of fear and trembling I was talking about...)
2 Corinthians 7:

15 And his inward affection is more abundant toward you, whilst he remembereth the obedience of you all, how with fear and trembling ye received him.
That is still the same fear and trembling. The fear of respect, and the trembling at what was once in store for the person before they were saved.
Ephesians 6:

5 Servants, be obedient to them that are your masters according to the flesh, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as unto Christ;
That is once again, still the same fear and trembling. Why the fear and trembling here? Because the master holds the right to life and death over their bondservants, which is a slave. "5 Bondservants,[a] obey your earthly masters[b] with fear and trembling, with a sincere heart, as you would Christ," The verse about the Masters of these bondservants would make this clear " 9 Masters, do the same to them, and stop your threatening, knowing that he who is both their Master[c] and yours is in heaven, and that there is no partiality with him." Stop threatening them. That would be a cause of fear and trembling, being threated with harsh punishment or even death.
In none of these verses “fear and trembling” means anything remotely resembling the meaning that he is trying to associate with it.
Actually, you pretty much nailed it.
1 Peter 1:

17 And if ye call on the Father, who without respect of persons judgeth according to every man’s work, pass the time of your sojourning here in fear:


In this verse Peter combines “fear” with “work” in the same way that Paul does in this verse, which is the subject of the discussion:
Actually it is pretty close, but not what you think. I understand you believe in a works based salvation, but this is not the same thing. The fear is of the Judge, who judge's the works of men. The fear and trembling in the verses in question for the OP is that the man falls short of salvation due to their lack of self-reflection, and false conversion.
Philippians 2:

12 Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.


Not by the wildest stretch of the imagination do the expressions “work out” and “fear and trembling” in this verse have the kind of meaning he is trying to associate with it.
Now, the only other way to take it, is the other way a calvinist would take it. Sanctification. Something everyone against calvinism forgets about. The fear and trembling is still the same though, the reason for fear and trembling may differ. My explanation still remains though.
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
That is the craziest and weirdest interpretation of “work out” [...] that anyone could have imagined.

If you're talking about your OWN post, I certainly have to agree!

16 And, behold, there came an old man from his work out of the field at even, which was also of mount Ephraim; and he sojourned in Gibeah: but the men of the place were Benjamites.


It never ceases to amaze me how low Mormons will go to try to twist and abuse God's word.



The first and main problem is that "work" in Phil. 2:12 is a VERB, and is in the IMPERATIVE mood ("Work out!"). While the word "work" in Judges 19:16 is a NOUN, in a sentence with an indicative verb, not an imperative ("there came an old man...")


The second problem is that the phrase "work out" doesn't even go together.
"there came an old man from his work, out of the field at even," (KJV)

The man didn't come from his "work out" (as if he was lifting weights, or something).
"he came ... OUT OF the field".
He was in the field, he did work (a noun), then he came OUT the field.

Compare other translations:

"Then behold, an old man was coming out of the field from his work at evening." (NASB)
" But then an old man passed by, returning at the end of the day from his work in the field." (NET)
 

armylngst

Well-known member
If you're talking about your OWN post, I certainly have to agree!




It never ceases to amaze me how low Mormons will go to try to twist and abuse God's word.



The first and main problem is that "work" in Phil. 2:12 is a VERB, and is in the IMPERATIVE mood ("Work out!"). While the word "work" in Judges 19:16 is a NOUN, in a sentence with an indicative verb, not an imperative ("there came an old man...")


The second problem is that the phrase "work out" doesn't even go together.
"there came an old man from his work, out of the field at even," (KJV)

The man didn't come from his "work out" (as if he was lifting weights, or something).
"he came ... OUT OF the field".
He was in the field, he did work (a noun), then he came OUT the field.

Compare other translations:

"Then behold, an old man was coming out of the field from his work at evening." (NASB)
" But then an old man passed by, returning at the end of the day from his work in the field." (NET)
I believe I made a mistake, not that Zerinus is correct. I may have blown the verse out of proportion. The thing I didn't consider during the time I wrote the first response, is that this is talking about sanctification, something I hold strongly to, I believe calvinists do as well, which would change the meaning of the passage. (Not in a bad way.) The only thing that would change in my answer is the part about armor that crumbles, and false conversion. It would instead be the work of a craftsman trying not to be ashamed when their master comes to check out their work.
 
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