Potential internet problems. Digital certificate expire Sept 30th

CrowCross

Well-known member
This is kind of a public service announcement just in case you wake up on Oct 1st and have internet problems.

Internet connectivity for old devices within your home could be coming to an end on Thursday.

A digital certificate that was widely used in electronic devices prior to 2017 will expire on September 30.

It’s estimated that millions of gadgets worldwide will be affected and won’t be able to install updates of newer digital certificates to allow for continued connectivity to the internet.

Devices that could run into trouble include older MacBooks and iPhones that haven’t (or can’t) be updated with the latest software, some gaming consoles like PlayStation 3 and Nintendo 3DS as well as smart TVs, set-top boxes and IoT devices within your home

Continue to article.
 

Yakuda

Well-known member
This is kind of a public service announcement just in case you wake up on Oct 1st and have internet problems.

Internet connectivity for old devices within your home could be coming to an end on Thursday.

A digital certificate that was widely used in electronic devices prior to 2017 will expire on September 30.

It’s estimated that millions of gadgets worldwide will be affected and won’t be able to install updates of newer digital certificates to allow for continued connectivity to the internet.

Devices that could run into trouble include older MacBooks and iPhones that haven’t (or can’t) be updated with the latest software, some gaming consoles like PlayStation 3 and Nintendo 3DS as well as smart TVs, set-top boxes and IoT devices within your home

Continue to article.
Two benefits I can see from this for some people. One it creates a demand for more products so more money for more expensive devices. Two, better flow control of information.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
Two benefits I can see from this for some people. One it creates a demand for more products so more money for more expensive devices. Two, better flow control of information.
My mac is 10.10.5. They say I might have problems.
Currently safari tells me I can't connect to certain sights...Bible hub is one of them...so I then open bible hub using Chrome.

I believe they suggest the work around may be by using firefox.

But it is amazing, it seems as if big tech is forcing you to upgrade when your computer is just fine.
 

shnarkle

Well-known member
This is kind of a public service announcement just in case you wake up on Oct 1st and have internet problems.

Internet connectivity for old devices within your home could be coming to an end on Thursday.

A digital certificate that was widely used in electronic devices prior to 2017 will expire on September 30.

It’s estimated that millions of gadgets worldwide will be affected and won’t be able to install updates of newer digital certificates to allow for continued connectivity to the internet.

Devices that could run into trouble include older MacBooks and iPhones that haven’t (or can’t) be updated with the latest software, some gaming consoles like PlayStation 3 and Nintendo 3DS as well as smart TVs, set-top boxes and IoT devices within your home

Continue to article.
This was covered at cyberpolygon as well. They're planning on crashing the system, and then getting everyone back online by having each and every person's identity verified. So, no more "CrowCross". You'll have to present your actual ID, ss#, vaccine passport, etc. See ya never.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
But it is amazing, it seems as if big tech is forcing you to upgrade when your computer is just fine.
No, that's not what's happening at all.

A certificate is a unique series of characters (aka. a signature, of sorts) which exist both on the device and the server it communicates with. This signature provides the END USER with a layer of security, in the form of recognizing the server you're trying to communicate with. This recognition is part of the process which encrypts the information between you and the server, which is critical when you're buying things online; it hides the information you and the server send each other.

If the signatures match, the communication goes on without issue. If the certificates don't match, different things will happen, depending on the device in-question. When we're talking about your computer, modern web browsers will usually throw a warning, saying you might not be communicating with the entity you assume, and that your data may no longer be encrypted. Older web browsers and even devices may just refuse to communicate.

When a certificate expires (as it seems to do routinely here at CRAM), the fix is for the SERVER to get a new certificate, and push it down to the end user. No "upgrade" necessary on your part. If a company does not want to support the service or web site any longer, it can just let the certificate expire, and people will no longer be able to connect to it with devices using the expired certificate. The vast majority of companies DO NOT do this, because it angers customers. Instead, the company releases a download which contains an updated certificate, which gets installed when you run the patch they provide you.

Any device which stops working permanently after a certificate expires has either reached its End Of Life phase, or has an owner that doesn't install the patches released by the company. In that case, the company no longer supports the device, and isn't afraid of angry customers, because the customer has chosen not to keep the device up to date.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
Any device which stops working permanently after a certificate expires has either reached its End Of Life phase or has an owner that doesn't install the patches released by the company.
Early planned demise.

My safari won't allow me to upgrade..where's the patch?
Apple won't allow me to upgrade above my current OS...where's the patch?
 

Temujin

Well-known member
No, that's not what's happening at all.

A certificate is a unique series of characters (aka. a signature, of sorts) which exist both on the device and the server it communicates with. This signature provides the END USER with a layer of security, in the form of recognizing the server you're trying to communicate with. This recognition is part of the process which encrypts the information between you and the server, which is critical when you're buying things online; it hides the information you and the server send each other.

If the signatures match, the communication goes on without issue. If the certificates don't match, different things will happen, depending on the device in-question. When we're talking about your computer, modern web browsers will usually throw a warning, saying you might not be communicating with the entity you assume, and that your data may no longer be encrypted. Older web browsers and even devices may just refuse to communicate.

When a certificate expires (as it seems to do routinely here at CRAM), the fix is for the SERVER to get a new certificate, and push it down to the end user. No "upgrade" necessary on your part. If a company does not want to support the service or web site any longer, it can just let the certificate expire, and people will no longer be able to connect to it with devices using the expired certificate. The vast majority of companies DO NOT do this, because it angers customers. Instead, the company releases a download which contains an updated certificate, which gets installed when you run the patch they provide you.

Any device which stops working permanently after a certificate expires has either reached its End Of Life phase, or has an owner that doesn't install the patches released by the company. In that case, the company no longer supports the device, and isn't afraid of angry customers, because the customer has chosen not to keep the device up to date.
Finally, the Truth gets its boots on.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Early planned demise.
Nope. Just normal certificate expiration.

My safari won't allow me to upgrade..where's the patch?
I have no idea what "My safari won't allow me to upgrade" is supposed to mean. It was never spoken by someone who understands computers, web certificates, web browsers or internet traffic.

Apple won't allow me to upgrade above my current OS...where's the patch?
Totally irrelevant to the topic of certificate expiry. Go call Apple's customer service hub in India, and complain to them.

----

Go ahead and tell us what you're having trouble communicating with, and believe it or not, I'll try to help as long as you're not being a ****.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
Nope. Just normal certificate expiration.


I have no idea what "My safari won't allow me to upgrade" is supposed to mean. It was never spoken by someone who understands computers, web certificates, web browsers or internet traffic.


Totally irrelevant to the topic of certificate expiry. Go call Apple's customer service hub in India, and complain to them.

----

Go ahead and tell us what you're having trouble communicating with, and believe it or not, I'll try to help as long as you're not being a ****.
Why does everything you say have to be in some form of opposition?

I was simply showing the folks here that on Oct 1st they may see some strange things concerning the internet.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Why does everything you say have to be in some form of opposition?
All you have to do is stop spreading misinformation, and thereafter, you'll see me magically clam up.

I was simply showing the folks here that on Oct 1st they may see some strange things concerning the internet.
You also claimed certificate expiry was a form of manufacturers forcing end users to buy new upgrades - which is completely false.

It's not my fault if you see being informed about what you're talking about a "form of opposition"...
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
Everyone who knows a tiny bit about computers knows that hardware technology improves by leaps and bounds. They also know that older computers/devices - over time - slowly stop being compatible with the currently used technologies.

I still have a Windows 3.1 machine. I can barely do anything useful with it anymore, similar to the way an old 30s telephone wont work through the lines being used today (without modification). It's fun to use it to see how technology has changed, but no one's gonna whine they can't use a century old phone to order pizza with.

If your Mac is old, certificates aren't going to solve your problems.
 

Whateverman

Well-known member
You must feel empowered considering you seem to be the only person with the truth.
If you think I'm the only person with the truth, you've got bigger problems than an old Mac.

Posts in this thread have answered a substantial number of your questions and concerns. The only reason for you to attack me personally is you never having been actually interested in the topic.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
If you think I'm the only person with the truth, you've got bigger problems than an old Mac.

Posts in this thread have answered a substantial number of your questions and concerns. The only reason for you to attack me personally is you never having been actually interested in the topic.
No, no attack...I've simply noticed anytime someone with a conservative view post something...even on a neutral topic..you socialist seem to find a way to object.
 

DeSanto

Well-known member
This is kind of a public service announcement just in case you wake up on Oct 1st and have internet problems.

Internet connectivity for old devices within your home could be coming to an end on Thursday.

A digital certificate that was widely used in electronic devices prior to 2017 will expire on September 30.

It’s estimated that millions of gadgets worldwide will be affected and won’t be able to install updates of newer digital certificates to allow for continued connectivity to the internet.

Devices that could run into trouble include older MacBooks and iPhones that haven’t (or can’t) be updated with the latest software, some gaming consoles like PlayStation 3 and Nintendo 3DS as well as smart TVs, set-top boxes and IoT devices within your home

Continue to article.
We need to chuck our phones. They serve as tracking devices.
 

CrowCross

Well-known member
I've been getting a lot of

"your connection is not private"
This server could not prove that it is (name of liknk); its security certificate is not valid at this time. This may be caused by a misconfiguration or an attacker intercepting your connection.


NET::ERR_CERT_DATE_INVALID
Back to safety
 

shnarkle

Well-known member
I've been getting a lot of

"your connection is not private"
This server could not prove that it is (name of liknk); its security certificate is not valid at this time. This may be caused by a misconfiguration or an attacker intercepting your connection.


NET::ERR_CERT_DATE_INVALID
Back to safety
Sounds like a scam. I used to get something similar accompanied by a loud obnoxious siren and a number to call to deal with possible federal charges being levied against me for committing a felony, etc. I just unplugged the computer and plugged it back in a few minutes later. Problem solved.

I called the number one time, and got some dude in India or Pakistan who told me that there were 200 hacks into my IP address, and that they could fix it for about $200.00 All I had to do was supply them with my credit card number.
 
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