"Prisoners of the Vatican" and the Heresy of Americanism

RayneBeau

Well-known member
It was on 8-18-1870, just one month after the issuance of the papal infallibility dogma issued by the Roman Catholic pope, that national troops of the unified Italy took possession of the patrimony of St. Peter - the Roman province itself. Roman Catholic Pope Pius IX who always held himself high above reproach and any form of correction, was left governor of exactly 480,000 square meters on and around Vatican Hill. Stripped of his earthly possessions, Pious IX literally shut himself up in the apostolic palace and refused to appear in public, even to bless 'his people'. His decisions and actions seem rather childish especially of a person his age and position. Wasn't that his duty as Roman Catholic pope to bless those who were "his people"?
 

jonathan_hili

Well-known member
From my understanding, popes still continued to give papal blessings but from within the basilica courtyard rather than going out into Rome proper (thus having the leave the Vatican). It was an incredibly tense time when the Church was facing not only increased secularism but a distinctly anti-Catholic and militaristic government. By "holding the fort", as it were, the popes (beginning with Pius IX and onwards) were refusing to concede to the Italian Kingdom's claim to power.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
It strikes me that the Roman Catholic supreme pontiffs, as "prisoners of the Vatican" became increasingly visceral in their denunciations of the modernity of those times - such as was evidenced by Pope Leo XIII's condemnation of what he labeled "Americanism" in an encyclical he wrote and made public at the beginning of 1899. The Roman Catholic pope declared that "Americanism" was a particularly vile heresy since it upheld the division of church and state and the right of individuals "to hold whatever opinion they please on any subject and to set such opinions forth in print." In other words the Roman Catholic popes' attack on the American lifestyle was because he (as the head of the religion that he represented), detested the fact that in America each person was free to have a mind of their own about anything, and they could even put it in writing. Imagine that!!!! 🤔
 

mica

Well-known member
It strikes me that the Roman Catholic supreme pontiffs, as "prisoners of the Vatican" became increasingly visceral in their denunciations of the modernity of those times - such as was evidenced by Pope Leo XIII's condemnation of what he labeled "Americanism" in an encyclical he wrote and made public at the beginning of 1899. The Roman Catholic pope declared that "Americanism" was a particularly vile heresy since it upheld the division of church and state and the right of individuals "to hold whatever opinion they please on any subject and to set such opinions forth in print." In other words the Roman Catholic popes' attack on the American lifestyle was because he (as the head of the religion that he represented), detested the fact that in America each person was free to have a mind of their own about anything, and they could even put it in writing. Imagine that!!!! 🤔
yes, imagine that! people the RCC / pope could not control! unfortunately the RCC still does have control of so many of those people. It holds things like 'mortal' sin (and other false teachings) over their heads. those still under the RCC control have no freedom in Christ.

it's good that he put it in writing - that he is against the free will of people. amazing tho since so many catholics on here continually speak out about their 'free will'. they have no 'free will' - they're bound to the will of the RCC, not the will of God.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Funnier still is the fact that that Leo XIII was even more disturbed at the demand by Americans for the Roman Catholic Church to surrender its cherished claims before the prevailing zeitgeist.
 
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