Progressive Christianity: What is it?

Reason for the question: A member of my extended family has self identified as a proponent of Progressive Christianity. He has enthusiastically embraced Rob Bell and Richard Rohr. My nephew attended private "Christian" schools k-12 followed by Whitworth College and Fuller Seminary in Pasadena. He has been working in campus ministries for two decades. This post isn't about my nephew. It is about the worldview he is caught up in.

The question:

How does Progressive Christianity differ from the modernism of the 20th century?

I am wondering if Progressive Christianity is really a thing. It seems that it is somewhat fuzzy at the edges.

There are a few apologists[1] who have taken up discussing Progressive Christianity. But some of them admit it isn't cohesive.

[1] for example, Alicia Childers
 

e v e

Active member
I read the article.
Another version from the own mind and not listening to God. In that respect it is similar to (much of) modern christianity.
 
I read the article.
Another version from the own mind and not listening to God. In that respect it is similar to (much of) modern christianity.
Yes, a good synopsis of Richard Rohr's Contemplative Spirituality. I only became aware of this because old friends, people whom I have respected, became involved with authors and teachers who are not promoting "Historic Christianity." This pattern repeats itself. In the last 30 years I have seen friends who were formerly orthodox wandering into dubious spiritual territory.
 
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Gary Mac

Member
Reason for the question: A member of my extended family has self identified as a proponent of Progressive Christianity. He has enthusiastically embraced Rob Bell and Richard Rohr. My nephew attended private "Christian" schools k-12 followed by Whitworth College and Fuller Seminary in Pasadena. He has been working in campus ministries for two decades. This post isn't about my nephew. It is about the worldview he is caught up in.

The question:

How does Progressive Christianity differ from the modernism of the 20th century?

I am wondering if Progressive Christianity is really a thing. It seems that it is somewhat fuzzy at the edges.

There are a few apologists[1] who have taken up discussing Progressive Christianity. But some of them admit it isn't cohesive.

[1] for example, Alicia Childers
People are always coming up with their own doctrines for beliefs of their gods in ignorance from lack in having the One Jesus had in himself as their own mind.
 
Reason for the question: A member of my extended family has self identified as a proponent of Progressive Christianity. He has enthusiastically embraced Rob Bell and Richard Rohr. My nephew attended private "Christian" schools k-12 followed by Whitworth College and Fuller Seminary in Pasadena. He has been working in campus ministries for two decades. This post isn't about my nephew. It is about the worldview he is caught up in.

The question:

How does Progressive Christianity differ from the modernism of the 20th century?

I am wondering if Progressive Christianity is really a thing. It seems that it is somewhat fuzzy at the edges.

There are a few apologists[1] who have taken up discussing Progressive Christianity. But some of them admit it isn't cohesive.

[1] for example, Alicia Childers
What is the issue with Rob Bell? I have seen a teaching by him, but don't know the breadth of what he teaches.
 

e v e

Active member
Yes, a good synopsis of Richard Rohr's Contemplative Spirituality. I only became aware of this because old friends, people whom I have respected, became involved with authors and teachers who are not promoting "Historic Christianity." This pattern repeats itself. In the last 30 years I have seen friends who were formerly orthodox wandering into dubious spiritual territory.


The fallen world and all its versions and translations. 😕
 
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I am listening to the audio book of Michael Kruger's book I just accessed from a local library. Philip Gulley and Richard Rohr seem to be the target of Kruger's analysis. Kruger starts with the assumption that Progressive movement is not much different from Modernism of the 19th and 20th century. He leans on Gresham Machen's Christianity and Liberalism.

Did Modernism involve spiritualism? Bishop James A. Pike only wandered into spiritualism toward the end of his life. I suspect there were other theological modernists who dabbled in spiritualism but it doesn't represent a prototypical component of Modernism. Richard Rohr is promoting something more dangerous than Modernism. Pike's life and death is a parable for the current generation to contemplate.
 
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Thanks. My opinion is that if it can't be stated in a few words, the disagreement must be more subtle and complex.

Yes it is complex and Micael Kruger's book doesn't address Rob Bell. I had never heard of Philip Gulley before listening to Micael Kruger's book. The book is good but incomplete. It doesn't address some important aspects of Progressive Christianity.

Rob Bell and Brian McLaren came to my attention during the Mars Hill Mark Driscoll era. Driscoll was at one time friendly with the Emergent movement. I was talking to friends who were engaged in the Mars Hill (Seattle) Driscoll phenomena, so when Rob Bell started unveiling his theology, I heard about it. Rob Bell's ideas were very familiar so it didn't grab my attention. Richard Rohr came to my attention because old friends of mine were engaging in contemplative spirituality. Taking spiritual pilgrimages to Ireland with Richard Rohr or someone like him. The Progressive movement wasn't on my radar because I didn't see it as connected with Richard Rohr. Not until recently. Alisa Childers makes the connection. I just started listening to her a few weeks ago.

I am still working on this project.
 
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Yes it is complex and Micael Kruger's book doesn't address Rob Bell. I had never heard of Philip Gulley before listening to Micael Kruger's book. The book is good but incomplete. It doesn't address some important aspects of Progressive Christianity.

Rob Bell and Brian McLaren came to my attention during the Mars Hill Mark Driscoll era. Driscoll was at one time friendly with the Emergent movement. I was talking to friends who were engaged in the Mars Hill (Seattle) Driscoll phenomena, so when Rob Bell started unveiling his theology, I heard about it. Rob Bell's ideas were very familiar so it didn't grab my attention. Richard Rohr came to my attention because old friends of mine were engaging in contemplative spirituality. Taking spiritual pilgrimages to Ireland with Richard Rohr or someone like him. The Progressive movement wasn't on my radar because I didn't see it as connected with Richard Rohr. Not until recently. Alisa Childers makes the connection. I just started listening to her a few weeks ago.

I am still working on this project.
thanks for the response.
 
Reason for the question: A member of my extended family has self identified as a proponent of Progressive Christianity. He has enthusiastically embraced Rob Bell and Richard Rohr. My nephew attended private "Christian" schools k-12 followed by Whitworth College and Fuller Seminary in Pasadena. He has been working in campus ministries for two decades. This post isn't about my nephew. It is about the worldview he is caught up in.

The question:

How does Progressive Christianity differ from the modernism of the 20th century?

I am wondering if Progressive Christianity is really a thing. It seems that it is somewhat fuzzy at the edges.

There are a few apologists[1] who have taken up discussing Progressive Christianity. But some of them admit it isn't cohesive.

[1] for example, Alicia Childers

Sounds like another excuse to create your own customized plan of salvation for yourself
 
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