Satan in Ezekiel and Isaiah

The Pixie

Well-known member
Christianity insists that both Ezekiel and Isaiah talk about Satan, and use both to contrive the narrative of Satan falling from heaven. The reality, I suggest, is that both passages are about earthly kings.

The account of Satan's fall from heaven was invented out of these texts, so naturally these texts match the account.

Ezekiel​

This is the text that is supposedly about Satan.

Ezekiel 28:13 You were in Eden, the garden of God;
Every precious stone was your covering:
The ruby, the topaz and the diamond;
The beryl, the onyx and the jasper;
The lapis lazuli, the turquoise and the emerald;
And the gold, the workmanship of your [f]settings and [g]sockets,
Was in you.
On the day that you were created
They were prepared.
14 You were the anointed cherub who [h]covers,
And I placed you there.
You were on the holy mountain of God;
You walked in the midst of the stones of fire.
15 You were blameless in your ways
From the day you were created
Until unrighteousness was found in you.
16 By the abundance of your trade
You were internally filled with violence,

And you sinned;
Therefore I have cast you as profane
From the mountain of God.
And I have destroyed you, you [j]covering cherub,
From the midst of the stones of fire.
17 Your heart was haughty because of your beauty;
You corrupted your wisdom by reason of your splendor.
I threw you to the ground;
I put you before kings,
That they may see you.
18 By the multitude of your wrongdoings,
In the unrighteousness of your trade
You profaned your sanctuaries.
Therefore I have brought fire from the midst of you;
It has consumed you,
And I have turned you to ashes on the earth
In the eyes of all who see you.

The rationale for it being about Satan is that it says the person discussed was in Eden. What this ignores, of course, is that it was a snake in Eden, not Satan. I would say, however, that this is a hyperbolic metaphor.

The text is about the King of Tyre, who lived in a palace so wonderful it was comparable to Eden. How do we know this? Well, from the context. Not least of all, verse 2, which explicitly states this is directed at the King of Tyre:

Ezekiel 28:1 The word of the Lord came again to me, saying, 2 “Son of man, say to the [a]leader of Tyre, ‘The Lord God says this:

“Because your heart is haughty
And you have said, ‘I am a god,
I sit in the seat of [c]gods
In the heart of the seas’;
Yet you are a mortal and not God,
Although you make your heart like the heart of God—

But perhaps we need to look at the greater context. Let us go back to Ezekiel 25... This is a judgement on various gentile nations; Ammon, Moab, Edom and Philistia. Then in Ezekiel 26 we get to Tyre. And we know it is about Tyre, because it says it is.

Ezekiel 26:1 Now in the eleventh year, on the first of the month, the word of the Lord came to me, saying, 2 “Son of man, because Tyre has said in regard to Jerusalem, ‘Aha! The gateway of the peoples is broken; it has [a]opened to me. I shall be filled, now that she is laid waste,’ 3 therefore this is what the Lord God says: ‘Behold, I am against you, Tyre, and I will bring up many nations against you, as the sea brings up its waves. 4 They will destroy the walls of Tyre and tear down her towers; and I will sweep her debris away from her and make her a bare rock. 5 She will become a dry place for the spreading of nets in the midst of the sea, for I have spoken,’ declares the Lord God; ‘and she will become plunder for the nations. 6 Also her daughters who are [c]on the mainland will be killed by the sword, and they will know that I am the Lord.’”

7 For the Lord God says this: “Behold, I am going to bring upon Tyre from the north Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, king of kings, with horses, chariots, cavalry, and [d]a great army. 8 He will kill your daughters [e]on the mainland with the sword; and he will make siege walls against you, pile up an assault ramp against you, and raise up a large shield against you.

This was an actual historical event, a thirteen year siege mentioned by Josephus, dated to around 585 to 573 BC.

Chapters 27 and 28 - including the verses quotes above - are a scornful lament to sing to the king of Tyre, Ithobaal III, for when the city eventually fell.

It also includes this prediction that Tyre would fall, and be utterly destroyed:

Ezekiel 27:36 The merchants among the peoples hiss at you;
You have become [r]terrified
And you will cease to be forever.’”’”

In fact, the city survived the siege, as Ezekiel 29:18 indicates.

Ezekiel 29:17 Now in the twenty-seventh year, in the first month, on the first of the month, the word of the Lord came to me, saying, 18 “Son of man, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made his army labor [r]hard against Tyre; every head had a bald spot and every shoulder was rubbed raw. But he and his army acquired no wages from Tyre for the labor that he had [t]performed against it.” 19 Therefore this is what the Lord God says: “Behold, I am going to give the land of Egypt to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon. And he will carry off her wealth and capture her spoils and seize her plunder; and it will be wages for his army. 20 I have given him the land of Egypt for his labor which he performed, because they acted for Me,” declares the Lord God.

I guess this was written at a slightly later date. Ezekiel had likely lived through the Babylonians besieging Jerusalem twice, and knew full well the might of their army. Chapters 26 to 28 were probably written when the siege of Tyre was underway, and it seemed a safe bet the city would fall. Thus Ezekiel has God bring judgement on Tyre. A few years later, the Babylonians gave up the siege, and turned their attentions to Egypt instead. So now Ezekiel decides God will not be smiting Tyre, despite all he said in chapters 26 to 28, and rather God is giving Egypt to the Babylonians.

Tyre is still around today, despite Ezekiel proclaiming "you will cease to be forever", and is noted in Wiki as "one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world". But I am sure its doom must have seemed imminent to Ezekiel.

The point here is that over chapters 26, 27, 28 and 29 the prophet Ezekiel is talking about the city of Tyre and the king of Tyre. It does not say Satan at all in Ezekiel, and there really is no reason to suppose six verses in the middle of that text are suddenly about a fallen angel.

 

The Pixie

Well-known member

Isaiah​

Isaiah is a little different, as it actually mentions Lucifer:

Isaiah 14:12 How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! how art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!

Or does it?

In fact, modern translations do not say "Lucifer". This page at Bible Hub allows us to compare modern translations (which I take to be twentieth century or later) against traditional translations. There are fifteen modern translations, and the word "lucifer" is absent from them all.

Here is the NASB translation:

Isaiah 14:12 How you have fallen from heaven,
You [g]star of the morning, son of the dawn!
You have been cut down to the earth,
You who defeated the nations!

It turns out that "lucifer" is really just a sarcastic taunt. Oh look at you, so high and might, like a star, see how far you have fallen now. As with Ezekiel, there is no actual mention of Satan here.

So what is it about? Let us look at the context. Chapter 13 gives a useful introduction to this section of Isaiah.

Isaiah 13:1 The pronouncement concerning Babylon which Isaiah the son of Amoz saw:
2 Lift up a flag on the [a]bare hill,
Raise your voice to them,
Wave the hand that they may enter the doors of the nobles.
3 I have commanded My consecrated ones,
I have also called for My warriors
Who boast in My eminence,
To execute My anger.

This leaves us in no doubt that this is about Babylon. It says it right there in the text. When it was written, the Hebrews were in captivity, living in exile in Babylon, and this is Isaiah prophesising how the Babylonians will come to their doom:

Isaiah 13:17Behold, I am going to stir up the Medes against them,
Who will not value silver or take pleasure in gold.
18 And their bows will [e]mow down the young men,
They will not even have compassion on the fruit of the womb,
Nor will their eye pity [f]children.

Chapter 14 is looking forward to that happy time:

Isaiah 14:1 When the Lord has compassion on Jacob and again chooses Israel, and settles them on their own land, then strangers will join them and attach themselves to the house of Jacob. 2 The peoples will take them along and bring them to their place, and the house of Israel will make them their own possession in the land of the Lord as male and female servants; and [a]they will take their captors captive and will rule over their oppressors.

It then goes on to say exactly how the Hebrews were to taunt the king of Babylon, when this happened.

3 And it will be on the day when the Lord gives you rest from your hardship, your turmoil, and from the harsh service in which you have been enslaved, 4 that you will take up this taunt against the king of Babylon, and say,

“How the oppressor has ceased,
And how the [c]onslaught has ceased!
5 The Lord has broken the staff of the wicked,
The scepter of rulers,
6 Which used to strike the peoples in fury with unceasing strokes,
Which [d]subdued the nations in anger with unrestrained persecution.
...
11 Your pride and the music of your harps
Have been brought down to Sheol;
Maggots are spread out as your bed beneath you
And worms are your covering.’
12 How you have fallen from heaven,
You [g]star of the morning, son of the dawn!
You have been cut down to the earth,
You who defeated the nations!
...


This, then, is a taunt to be used against the king of Babylon, and not anything to do with Satan.

This section of Isaiah ends:

Isaiah 14:22 “I will rise up against them,” declares the Lord of armies, “and eliminate from Babylon name and survivors, offspring and descendants,” declares the Lord. 23 “I will also make it the property of the hedgehog and swamps of water, and I will sweep it away with the broom of destruction,” declares the Lord of armies.

Again, this is explicitly directed at Babylon, making it clear that this is not about Satan. The entire passage from Isaiah 13:1 to Isaiah 14:23 is about Babylon. To suppose that a few verses in the middle of that are talking about a fallen angel is just nonsense.
 

5wize

Well-known member
Good stuff. In fact, the mythological satan was sprinkled into this backwards looking report of history (not prophesy) in the second temple period when the concept of the Zoroastrian "adversary" was imported home after the exile. Until then, Jews had no concept of a supernatural power other than their single monotheistic God. To conceive of such was blasphemy and you see many of the stories of the Torah attempting to cleave the legitimacy of their God away from the rest that were imported home.

This period was rich with literary invention in order to congeal a culture around history and myth. Many of the patriarchs were invented in this era as well, such as the creation myths from Greece, Abraham being from Ur, a Jew named Moses from Egypt, and a flood as often happened in the Tigris/Euphrates valley - all lands where dispersed Jews eventually returned from with their local cultural fables all incorporated to build something that was missing for them - missing for the Habiru - the dirty wanderer - the cultureless conglomeration - the people not of a single land or history - but of a "book" - a book being congealed right before their eyes and in their time (the second temple period) and not from the beginning of creation.
 
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5wize

Well-known member
Just takes a little education on the subject matter of what it means to be a Christian - the roots of a belief system... ironically something we find many Christians just not interested in or capable of.
 

Furion

Well-known member
Just takes a little education on the subject matter of what it means to be a Christian - the roots of a belief system... ironically something we find many Christians just not interested in or capable of.
Goodness, atheists trying to learn me on what it means to be a Christian.

The audacity is impressive, I will give you that.

Nope, where were you when my wife lay dying? Where were you when I was broke? Where were you when I had no job? Where was the Lord? He was with me, but where were you?

I am fairly certain you have no idea the heartache and the heartbreak of being a Christian, even if you study and study it.

But I have no issue with you thinking you are the gatekeeper to who is the proper christian. I've seen many climb over the fence before, but there is only one gate, and it's not a gate, it's Jesus Christ. The root is Christ.

So as you think your rudimentary psychological treatises on men from two thousand years ago informs you of something, actual christians are like the wind, you hear it's sound but you don't know where it came from or where it's going.
 

5wize

Well-known member
So as you think your rudimentary psychological treatises on men from two thousand years ago informs you of something, actual christians are like the wind, you hear it's sound but you don't know where it came from or where it's going.
Problem is is that neither do they.
 

stiggy wiggy

Well-known member
Christianity insists that both Ezekiel and Isaiah talk about Satan, and use both to contrive the narrative of Satan falling from heaven. The reality, I suggest, is that both passages are about earthly kings.

In further news, some literary critics claim that the story of Aslan is about Jesus. The reality, idiots suggest, is that it's only about a lion.
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
In further news, some literary critics claim that the story of Aslan is about Jesus. The reality, idiots suggest, is that it's only about a lion.
We can be pretty sure Lewis meant Aslan to stand for Jesus because he said so. Why should we suppose Ezekiel or Isaiah had Satan in mind when they were writing?
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
No one is asking YOU to suppose anything.
Right. This is apologetics; it is about circling the wagons and protecting the faithful from reality.

You want your fellow Christians to suppose that Ezekiel and Isaiah had Satan in mind when they were writing, on the basis that that is what they want to believe. Argument by wishful thinking, so try to keep the atheists out of it.

My guess is you will just snip the rest of this post from your reply, because you know as well as I do that Christianity has no answers to these questions, and the best you will be able to do is contrive some excuse for why they are not worth bothering with:
  • Just how much of Ezekiel do you think is about Satan? Chapter 26 mentions the king of Tyre a few times. Is that about Satan? What about in chapter 29? Still about Satan there?
  • In this supposed story about Satan, who or what is Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, analogous to? Another angel? God?
  • It is kind of sad the king of Tyre - or Satan as you would have us believe - actually prevails. If this is really about Satan, then it is describing Satan being under siege for a very long time, but ultimately surviving the siege!
  • And what about Ezekiel 25, where there is a judgement on various gentile nations; Ammon, Moab, Edom and Philistia. Are they other fallen angels? Or is it only an analogy when you want it to be; when it is convenient for Christianity's twisting of the story?

But if you do just ignore them, you will be telling the world that your beliefs here are based purely on what Christianity has told you to believe, and not on what the Bible actually says, and furthermore that you just accept those beliefs without actually thinking for yourself. And of course that is fine for you - live your life how you want - but it certainly puts every claim you make on CARM in a certain light.
 

stiggy wiggy

Well-known member
My guess is you will just snip the rest of this post from your reply,

Not exactly Nostradamus, are you? Not even a Miss Cleo.
Just how much of Ezekiel do you think is about Satan? .

A lot of it. Read it. Lots of evil. Guess who likes to perpetrate evil.

Chapter 26 mentions the king of Tyre a few times. Is that about Satan?

Yep.

What about in chapter 29? Still about Satan there?

Yep.


  • In this supposed story about Satan, who or what is Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, analogous to? Another angel? God?

Satan.


  • It is kind of sad the king of Tyre - or Satan as you would have us believe - actually prevails. If this is really about Satan, then it is describing Satan being under siege for a very long time, but ultimately surviving the siege!
But not for long. Guess you haven't got to Revelation yet. Keep reading.

  • And what about Ezekiel 25, where there is a judgement on various gentile nations; Ammon, Moab, Edom and Philistia. Are they other fallen angels?
I believe so. See Michael Heiser's "The Unseen Realm."
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
Wow, looks like I was wrong about that. That is quite a surprise.

I just want to pick up on one of your replies, as it is especially interesting.
I earlier said:
In this supposed story about Satan, who or what is Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, analogous to? Another angel? God?
What is interesting is that according to Ezekiel, Nebuchadnezzar is doing the Lord's work. See here:

Ezekiel 26:7 For the Lord God says this: “Behold, I am going to bring upon Tyre from the north Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, king of kings, with horses, chariots, cavalry, and [d]a great army. 8 He will kill your daughters [e]on the mainland with the sword; and he will make siege walls against you, pile up an assault ramp against you, and raise up a large shield against you. 9 And he will direct the blow of his battering rams against your walls, and he will tear down your towers with his [f]axes.

And furthermore, God gives Nebuchadnezzar - or Satan as you insist - a reward. God gives Egypt to Satan!

Ezekiel 29:19 Therefore this is what the Lord God says: “Behold, I am going to give the land of Egypt to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon. And he will carry off her wealth and capture her spoils and seize her plunder; and it will be wages for his army. 20 I have given him the land of Egypt for his labor which he performed, because they acted for Me,” declares the Lord God.

Now what makes that even more strange, is that this is God's reward to Satan for laying siege to Satan!

Ezekiel 26:7 For the Lord God says this: “Behold, I am going to bring upon Tyre from the north Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, king of kings, with horses, chariots, cavalry, and [d]a great army. 8 He will kill your daughters [e]on the mainland with the sword; and he will make siege walls against you, pile up an assault ramp against you, and raise up a large shield against you. 9 And he will direct the blow of his battering rams against your walls, and he will tear down your towers with his [f]axes.

How very odd. So yes, I am most surprised that you replied, but I am so delighted that you did. Suddenly we can see Christian mythology in all its glory. Bit I am sure that all that makes perfect sense to you stiggy.
 

stiggy wiggy

Well-known member
Wow, looks like I was wrong about that. That is quite a surprise.

Why are you surprised? You're always wrong.

What is interesting is that according to Ezekiel, Nebuchadnezzar is doing the Lord's work.

So did Satan at Calvary on a grand scale, and on a smaller scale by giving Paul a thorn in the flesh.

And furthermore, God gives Nebuchadnezzar - or Satan as you insist - a reward. God gives Egypt to Satan,

WRONG! He gave it to Nebuchadnezzar. Egypt is a type of the world. Satan is ruler of this fallen world. More typology.
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
So did Satan at Calvary on a grand scale, and on a smaller scale by giving Paul a thorn in the flesh.
Okay.

WRONG! He gave it to Nebuchadnezzar. Egypt is a type of the world. Satan is ruler of this fallen world. More typology.
When I asked you who Nebuchadnezzar was analogous to, you said Satan. I am just going off what you said.

So explain the analogy. After the supposed fall of satan in chapter 28, we read this.

Ezekiel 29:19 Therefore this is what the Lord God says: “Behold, I am going to give the land of Egypt to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon. And he will carry off her wealth and capture her spoils and seize her plunder; and it will be wages for his army. 20 I have given him the land of Egypt for his labor which he performed, because they acted for Me,” declares the Lord God.

You already said Nebuchadnezzar is analogous to Satan, so what is analogous to Egypt - what reward did God give Satan?

Or have you changed your mind about that?
 

stiggy wiggy

Well-known member
Okay.


When I asked you who Nebuchadnezzar was analogous to, you said Satan.

Correct.

So explain the analogy. After the supposed fall of satan in chapter 28, we read this.

Ezekiel 29:19 Therefore this is what the Lord God says: “Behold, I am going to give the land of Egypt to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon. And he will carry off her wealth and capture her spoils and seize her plunder; and it will be wages for his army. 20 I have given him the land of Egypt for his labor which he performed, because they acted for Me,” declares the Lord God.

You already said Nebuchadnezzar is analogous to Satan, so what is analogous to - what Egypt?

The world. Satan is ruler of this world. Why must I repeat myself? And types are not synonymous with analogies.

Or have you changed your mind about that?

Nope.
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
Correct.

The world. Satan is ruler of this world. Why must I repeat myself? And types are not synonymous with analogies.

Nope.
Great. So we are quite clear that the narrative in Ezekiel is an analogy of God setting Satan to besige the fallen Satan, and when the siege failed in history, it not fail in the analogy and Satan defeated Satan, and so Satan and his was reward for defeating and also not defeating Satan.

Glad that is cleared up. Makes as much sense as the rest of Christianity.
 

stiggy wiggy

Well-known member
Great. So we are quite clear that the narrative in Ezekiel is an analogy of God setting Satan to besige the fallen Satan..

Say WHAT? Where does it say the King of Tyre besiges (sic) himself?

Glad that is cleared up.

About as cleared up as the pimply face of a 13 year old boy on a diet of Moon Pies and RC Colas.
 

docphin5

Well-known member
Christianity insists that both Ezekiel and Isaiah talk about Satan, and use both to contrive the narrative of Satan falling from heaven. The reality, I suggest, is that both passages are about earthly kings.

The account of Satan's fall from heaven was invented out of these texts, so naturally these texts match the account.

Ezekiel​

This is the text that is supposedly about Satan.

Ezekiel 28:13 You were in Eden, the garden of God;
Every precious stone was your covering:
The ruby, the topaz and the diamond;
The beryl, the onyx and the jasper;
The lapis lazuli, the turquoise and the emerald;
And the gold, the workmanship of your [f]settings and [g]sockets,
Was in you.
On the day that you were created
They were prepared.
14 You were the anointed cherub who [h]covers,
And I placed you there.
You were on the holy mountain of God;
You walked in the midst of the stones of fire.
15 You were blameless in your ways
From the day you were created
Until unrighteousness was found in you.
16 By the abundance of your trade
You were internally filled with violence,

And you sinned;
Therefore I have cast you as profane
From the mountain of God.
And I have destroyed you, you [j]covering cherub,
From the midst of the stones of fire.
17 Your heart was haughty because of your beauty;
You corrupted your wisdom by reason of your splendor.
I threw you to the ground;
I put you before kings,
That they may see you.
18 By the multitude of your wrongdoings,
In the unrighteousness of your trade
You profaned your sanctuaries.
Therefore I have brought fire from the midst of you;
It has consumed you,
And I have turned you to ashes on the earth
In the eyes of all who see you.

The rationale for it being about Satan is that it says the person discussed was in Eden. What this ignores, of course, is that it was a snake in Eden, not Satan. I would say, however, that this is a hyperbolic metaphor.

The text is about the King of Tyre, who lived in a palace so wonderful it was comparable to Eden. How do we know this? Well, from the context. Not least of all, verse 2, which explicitly states this is directed at the King of Tyre:

Ezekiel 28:1 The word of the Lord came again to me, saying, 2 “Son of man, say to the [a]leader of Tyre, ‘The Lord God says this:

“Because your heart is haughty
And you have said, ‘I am a god,
I sit in the seat of [c]gods
In the heart of the seas’;
Yet you are a mortal and not God,
Although you make your heart like the heart of God—

But perhaps we need to look at the greater context. Let us go back to Ezekiel 25... This is a judgement on various gentile nations; Ammon, Moab, Edom and Philistia. Then in Ezekiel 26 we get to Tyre. And we know it is about Tyre, because it says it is.

Ezekiel 26:1 Now in the eleventh year, on the first of the month, the word of the Lord came to me, saying, 2 “Son of man, because Tyre has said in regard to Jerusalem, ‘Aha! The gateway of the peoples is broken; it has [a]opened to me. I shall be filled, now that she is laid waste,’ 3 therefore this is what the Lord God says: ‘Behold, I am against you, Tyre, and I will bring up many nations against you, as the sea brings up its waves. 4 They will destroy the walls of Tyre and tear down her towers; and I will sweep her debris away from her and make her a bare rock. 5 She will become a dry place for the spreading of nets in the midst of the sea, for I have spoken,’ declares the Lord God; ‘and she will become plunder for the nations. 6 Also her daughters who are [c]on the mainland will be killed by the sword, and they will know that I am the Lord.’”

7 For the Lord God says this: “Behold, I am going to bring upon Tyre from the north Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, king of kings, with horses, chariots, cavalry, and [d]a great army. 8 He will kill your daughters [e]on the mainland with the sword; and he will make siege walls against you, pile up an assault ramp against you, and raise up a large shield against you.

This was an actual historical event, a thirteen year siege mentioned by Josephus, dated to around 585 to 573 BC.

Chapters 27 and 28 - including the verses quotes above - are a scornful lament to sing to the king of Tyre, Ithobaal III, for when the city eventually fell.

It also includes this prediction that Tyre would fall, and be utterly destroyed:

Ezekiel 27:36 The merchants among the peoples hiss at you;
You have become [r]terrified
And you will cease to be forever.’”’”

In fact, the city survived the siege, as Ezekiel 29:18 indicates.

Ezekiel 29:17 Now in the twenty-seventh year, in the first month, on the first of the month, the word of the Lord came to me, saying, 18 “Son of man, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made his army labor [r]hard against Tyre; every head had a bald spot and every shoulder was rubbed raw. But he and his army acquired no wages from Tyre for the labor that he had [t]performed against it.” 19 Therefore this is what the Lord God says: “Behold, I am going to give the land of Egypt to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon. And he will carry off her wealth and capture her spoils and seize her plunder; and it will be wages for his army. 20 I have given him the land of Egypt for his labor which he performed, because they acted for Me,” declares the Lord God.

I guess this was written at a slightly later date. Ezekiel had likely lived through the Babylonians besieging Jerusalem twice, and knew full well the might of their army. Chapters 26 to 28 were probably written when the siege of Tyre was underway, and it seemed a safe bet the city would fall. Thus Ezekiel has God bring judgement on Tyre. A few years later, the Babylonians gave up the siege, and turned their attentions to Egypt instead. So now Ezekiel decides God will not be smiting Tyre, despite all he said in chapters 26 to 28, and rather God is giving Egypt to the Babylonians.

Tyre is still around today, despite Ezekiel proclaiming "you will cease to be forever", and is noted in Wiki as "one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world". But I am sure its doom must have seemed imminent to Ezekiel.

The point here is that over chapters 26, 27, 28 and 29 the prophet Ezekiel is talking about the city of Tyre and the king of Tyre. It does not say Satan at all in Ezekiel, and there really is no reason to suppose six verses in the middle of that text are suddenly about a fallen angel.

That is a very good question: How could the King of Tyre be associated with Satan? One logical answer is that every human is associated with the Adversary through the elements identified (back then) as: earth, fire, water, and air; with earth forming the body (Genesis 2:7). Therefore, although Ezekiel names the King of Tyre, he could be addressing the King’s nature common to all humans descended from the Adam (Man) in Eden, that is, the body formed of earth.

”In the same way we also, when we were children, were enslaved to the elementary principles of the world.” (Galatians 4:3)

”Wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death?” (Romans 7:24)

It would be like me talking about Michael Jordan then digressing into the origins of basketball. The question would be why did Ezekiel fill the need to digress from the King to the origins of the King’s nature. I don’t know for certain but maybe he is digressing from the earthly war to the spiritual war being fought by the inner man. The one between flesh and spirit.

By the way, I wouldn’t be surprised if his cosmology and formation of matter from cosmic powers is syncretic with Chaldean, Persian, or Egyptian ideas since those were the dominant religions at that time. Judaism was a minor player in that region and likely absorbing ideas from its neighbors. Just like we discovered in the Dead Sea Scrolls that the Essenes were dualistic maybe Ezekiel was a dualist Too. Dualists can believe in “the God Most High” just as Essenes did.
 
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