Scripture readings for 3rd Sunday of Easter

LifeIn

Well-known member
The first reading at today's mass is from Acts 3. Starting in verse 13 we see Peter telling the people who were complicit in the death of Jesus that, after all they have done in pressuring Pilate when Pilate was going to release Jesus, that even now there is hope for them if them but repent and have those sins wiped away. Peter is in no position to act very self-righteous because he knows very well all the times when he has failed Jesus - in trying to dissuade him from going to Jerusalem (when Jesus called him Satan), when denying Jesus before the bystanders during Jesus' trial. Peter knows he has been given a second chance (and the third and fourth and fifth chance..) by Jesus. Therefore he tries to extend the same mercy to those that are responsible for his death.

The second reading is from the beginning of 1 John 2. After exhorting believers not to sin, he returns to a theme from the first chapter, that forgiveness of sins is made possible by the blood of Jesus, and that his offering was not only for the sins of their community, but for the whole world.

The Gospel for today comes from Luke 24:35-48. This one of the many "after resurrection reports" in the New Testament. In a way these reports read more like "breaking news" stories. They tell the same story from different angles, sometimes with minor differences in details as more information becomes available. In today's reading we hear again about the two disciples on the road to Emmaus. While those two disciples were telling their story (probably not for the first time that day), we then have an appearance of the risen Christ. As usual, the first words of Jesus are "Peace be with you!" He goes on to assure them that he is flesh and bones, not a ghost, and even eats some baked fish in their presence. Some time after that, after the initial excitement and disbelief had died down, Jesus proceeded to "open their minds" to the scriptures and how they relate to him. This is similar to how he "opened the minds" of those two disciples on the road to Emmaus.

Any other reflections on these readings?
 

leonard03782

Well-known member
The first reading at today's mass is from Acts 3. Starting in verse 13 we see Peter telling the people who were complicit in the death of Jesus that, after all they have done in pressuring Pilate when Pilate was going to release Jesus, that even now there is hope for them if them but repent and have those sins wiped away. Peter is in no position to act very self-righteous because he knows very well all the times when he has failed Jesus - in trying to dissuade him from going to Jerusalem (when Jesus called him Satan), when denying Jesus before the bystanders during Jesus' trial. Peter knows he has been given a second chance (and the third and fourth and fifth chance..) by Jesus. Therefore he tries to extend the same mercy to those that are responsible for his death.

The second reading is from the beginning of 1 John 2. After exhorting believers not to sin, he returns to a theme from the first chapter, that forgiveness of sins is made possible by the blood of Jesus, and that his offering was not only for the sins of their community, but for the whole world.

The Gospel for today comes from Luke 24:35-48. This one of the many "after resurrection reports" in the New Testament. In a way these reports read more like "breaking news" stories. They tell the same story from different angles, sometimes with minor differences in details as more information becomes available. In today's reading we hear again about the two disciples on the road to Emmaus. While those two disciples were telling their story (probably not for the first time that day), we then have an appearance of the risen Christ. As usual, the first words of Jesus are "Peace be with you!" He goes on to assure them that he is flesh and bones, not a ghost, and even eats some baked fish in their presence. Some time after that, after the initial excitement and disbelief had died down, Jesus proceeded to "open their minds" to the scriptures and how they relate to him. This is similar to how he "opened the minds" of those two disciples on the road to Emmaus.

Any other reflections on these readings?
This sounds like your interpretation of what the readings were. I thought that responsibility belonged the magisterium alone. Or......., is that another teaching of their religion that rc's can choose to take or leave?
 

pilgrim

Well-known member
The first reading at today's mass is from Acts 3. Starting in verse 13 we see Peter telling the people who were complicit in the death of Jesus that, after all they have done in pressuring Pilate when Pilate was going to release Jesus, that even now there is hope for them if them but repent and have those sins wiped away. Peter is in no position to act very self-righteous because he knows very well all the times when he has failed Jesus - in trying to dissuade him from going to Jerusalem (when Jesus called him Satan), when denying Jesus before the bystanders during Jesus' trial. Peter knows he has been given a second chance (and the third and fourth and fifth chance..) by Jesus. Therefore he tries to extend the same mercy to those that are responsible for his death.

The second reading is from the beginning of 1 John 2. After exhorting believers not to sin, he returns to a theme from the first chapter, that forgiveness of sins is made possible by the blood of Jesus, and that his offering was not only for the sins of their community, but for the whole world.

The Gospel for today comes from Luke 24:35-48. This one of the many "after resurrection reports" in the New Testament. In a way these reports read more like "breaking news" stories. They tell the same story from different angles, sometimes with minor differences in details as more information becomes available. In today's reading we hear again about the two disciples on the road to Emmaus. While those two disciples were telling their story (probably not for the first time that day), we then have an appearance of the risen Christ. As usual, the first words of Jesus are "Peace be with you!" He goes on to assure them that he is flesh and bones, not a ghost, and even eats some baked fish in their presence. Some time after that, after the initial excitement and disbelief had died down, Jesus proceeded to "open their minds" to the scriptures and how they relate to him. This is similar to how he "opened the minds" of those two disciples on the road to Emmaus.

Any other reflections on these readings?
"Jesus proceeded to 'open their minds' to the Scriptures". Jesus taught with authority. He did not say, "Search the Scriptures and decide for yourself if what I say is true." Jesus passed this authority to the Church to teach and to baptize, which is how they were to make disciples of all nations.
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
"Jesus proceeded to 'open their minds' to the Scriptures". Jesus taught with authority. He did not say, "Search the Scriptures and decide for yourself if what I say is true." Jesus passed this authority to the Church to teach and to baptize, which is how they were to make disciples of all nations.
Jesus passed the authority to his inspired word, not to RCC's uninspired Tradition.

John 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
 

balshan

Well-known member
"Jesus proceeded to 'open their minds' to the Scriptures". Jesus taught with authority. He did not say, "Search the Scriptures and decide for yourself if what I say is true." Jesus passed this authority to the Church to teach and to baptize, which is how they were to make disciples of all nations.
Your church shows by its fruit that it does not have Jesus' authority at all. Nowhere does Jesus say force people to be my disciples.
 

mica

Well-known member
"Jesus proceeded to 'open their minds' to the Scriptures". Jesus taught with authority.
it does not say 'to open their minds to the words of false teachers'. It doesn't mention the RCC or a pope.

He taught with authority - because He is the authority, not man. He taught specific men who would later pen those teachings (under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit) for all future generations to read, know and live by. He did not teach and those men did not write the teachings of the RCC.

Whose words do catholics read, know and live by, those of Him or those of the men of the RCC? Catholics don't open their minds to what is written in scripture. They open their minds to the words taught by the RCC, like those found in the ccc.

He did not say, "Search the Scriptures and decide for yourself if what I say is true."
no He didn't, so why do catholics decide His words aren't true? They do that because they don't read, study, know and believe His word.

why do catholics decide that the words of the RCC men are true? They do that because it is what they've been taught by men, not by reading or studying God's written word. They don't check God's word to find out if what the RCC teaches them is His truth. It takes more than finding a word in scripture that matches a word in a catholic teaching - such as water, baptism, confess etc to align what the RCC teaches with scripture. It isn't a 'word match' game.

Jesus passed this authority to the Church to teach and to baptize, which is how they were to make disciples of all nations.
He did not pass on authority to change His words, to make up new words or to make up new beliefs or doctrines, which is what the RCC does.

The RCC does not teach His words. Those who do believe His words and teach them are making disciples in all nations. The RCC is not. It makes disciples of the RCC, not of Christ.

Baptism - changed (matt 3.11). read the words of JTB. Much changed with His death and resurrection and with the coming gift of the Holy Spirit to those who do believe in and follow Him. The RCC doesn't appear to know or teach that.
 

pilgrim

Well-known member
Jesus passed the authority to his inspired word, not to RCC's uninspired Tradition.

John 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
39 You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that testify about me, 40 yet you refuse to come to me to have life.

Who is "you" in the verse above?

The Jews. ( see verse 10)

So what Scriptures does Jesus refer to? The Old Testament.

If Jesus passed His authority to the Old Testament, wouldn't we still be under the Old Covenant?
 

RiJoRi

Well-known member
In today's reading we hear again about the two disciples on the road to Emmaus. While those two disciples were telling their story (probably not for the first time that day), we then have an appearance of the risen Christ. As usual, the first words of Jesus are "Peace be with you!" He goes on to assure them that he is flesh and bones, not a ghost, and even eats some baked fish in their presence. Some time after that, after the initial excitement and disbelief had died down, Jesus proceeded to "open their minds" to the scriptures and how they relate to him. This is similar to how he "opened the minds" of those two disciples on the road to Emmaus.

Any other reflections on these readings?
Comment: Please read Luke 24:13-32. The author seems to have conflated several post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus.

--Rich
 

Bonnie

Super Member
"Jesus proceeded to 'open their minds' to the Scriptures". Jesus taught with authority. He did not say, "Search the Scriptures and decide for yourself if what I say is true." Jesus passed this authority to the Church to teach and to baptize, which is how they were to make disciples of all nations.
Jesus actually QUOTED Scriptures to prove to the 2 men that the Messiah needed to suffer and die, and be raised again on the third day. He used ACTUAL SCRIPTURE. Not man-made doctrines. He did NOT give His church permission to add man-made teachings or to "teach for doctrine the commandments of men" as your church has so shamefully done.
 
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mica

Well-known member
PeanutGallery said:
Jesus passed the authority to his inspired word, not to RCC's uninspired Tradition.

John 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
39 You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that testify about me, 40 yet you refuse to come to me to have life.

Who is "you" in the verse above?

The Jews. ( see verse 10)
yes, His ministry on earth was to the Jews only - with a few exceptions. (matt 10, Matt 15 and I think Luke 2)

So what Scriptures does Jesus refer to? The Old Testament.
of course, Jesus was a Jew, teaching to Jews - still in OT time.

If Jesus passed His authority to the Old Testament, wouldn't we still be under the Old Covenant?
Was He an authority in OT time?

Are we living in OT time now? When did the NC start?

Believers aren't living in OT time. Some people think they are, and some people try to straddle both.
 

PeanutGallery

Well-known member
39 You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that testify about me, 40 yet you refuse to come to me to have life.

Who is "you" in the verse above?

The Jews. ( see verse 10)

So what Scriptures does Jesus refer to? The Old Testament.

If Jesus passed His authority to the Old Testament, wouldn't we still be under the Old Covenant?
And your point? We are to search OT/NT scripture today as did the Jews search in the OT scripture.
 

LifeIn

Well-known member
yes, His ministry on earth was to the Jews only - with a few exceptions. (matt 10, Matt 15 and I think Luke 2)

of course, Jesus was a Jew, teaching to Jews - still in OT time.

Was He an authority in OT time?
I don't know what you are getting at here. Of course Jesus was and is an authority for all time. He is God. But then I suspect you already knew that, so I must be misunderstanding you here.
 

4Him

Administrator
Staff member
"Jesus proceeded to 'open their minds' to the Scriptures". Jesus taught with authority. He did not say, "Search the Scriptures and decide for yourself if what I say is true." Jesus passed this authority to the Church to teach and to baptize, which is how they were to make disciples of all nations.

We are the church, not an apostate religious organization like the RCC.
 

LifeIn

Well-known member
catholic beliefs don't support that.
Oh, I see. You were pretending to speak like you thought a Catholic would speak. I suggest that before you make pronouncements on what Catholic beliefs do and do not support that you find out what Catholic beliefs actually are. Otherwise you would be just building a straw man to argue against.
 

mica

Well-known member
Oh, I see. You were pretending to speak like you thought a Catholic would speak.
I was? is what I posted something that you think a catholic might say?

I suggest that before you make pronouncements on what Catholic beliefs do and do not support that you find out what Catholic beliefs actually are. Otherwise you would be just building a straw man to argue against.
I know lots of them. I was raised catholic and spent lots of years in catholic schools. that was mostly prior to Vat II. A lot of my family is still catholic and most of my old school friends still are also. the RCC changed some things but God's word doesn't change.
 

LifeIn

Well-known member
I know lots of them. I was raised catholic and spent lots of years in catholic schools. that was mostly prior to Vat II. A lot of my family is still catholic and most of my old school friends still are also.
Do you still read the bible? Even though you already read it before? Of course you do. And why do you do that? Isn't it because you think there is always more to learn - that you can improve your understanding of scripture? What if you came across someone who said "I read the bible 50 years ago. I don't need to read it again."? Wouldn't you think that odd? Well, that is just like someone who say "I went to Catholic school 50 years ago and I know some people who are Catholic, so I know everything there is to know about Catholic beliefs, so much so that I can say for certain that Catholics do not believe that Jesus is the authority of all time." That is, by way, a ludicrous claim as anyone who knows the Catholic faith will tell you.
 

mica

Well-known member
Do you still read the bible? Even though you already read it before? Of course you do. And why do you do that? Isn't it because you think there is always more to learn - that you can improve your understanding of scripture? What if you came across someone who said "I read the bible 50 years ago. I don't need to read it again."? Wouldn't you think that odd?
how long have you been reading the bible? in catholic school we were told we didn't need to read it, that they'd teach us what we needed to know. Did you go to catholic schools growing up?

I certainly would if they claimed to be a believer. Otherwise I wouldn't think it odd. That'd be the reply of most unbelievers.


Well, that is just like someone who say "I went to Catholic school 50 years ago and I know some people who are Catholic, so I know everything there is to know about Catholic beliefs, so much so that I can say for certain that Catholics do not believe that Jesus is the authority of all time."
please post where I said that. give me the post #.

catholics themselves tell us that on here. Whose words do catholics believe in and follow - those of God (scripture) or those of the RCC (ccc, pope etc)?

That is, by way, a ludicrous claim as anyone who knows the Catholic faith will tell you.
according to a catholic who believes the words of the RCC over those of scripture, but

any former catholic who has been born again and is out of the 'babe in Christ' stage (has had time to read and study actual scripture) will not say that.
 

RayneBeau

Well-known member
Jesus passed the authority to his inspired word, not to RCC's uninspired Tradition.

John 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
But RCC 'Tradition' is a whole different thing altogether. The RCC says that if anyone wants to understand their 'Tradition' that they must look to the Roman Catholic Church, for 'Tradition,' says Rome, lives within the [Roman Catholic ] Church. 'It is a living thing, the life experience of the Roman Catholic people.' And their Catechism says that it is "written principally in the [Roman Catholic] Church's heart rather than in documents and records."
 
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