Seminary - what should one look for?

For those of you who have been to seminary:
1. Which seminary did you go to?
2. Would you go to that same seminary again, or a different one? Why?
3. What did you like or dislike about that seminary?
 

SteveB

Well-known member
For those of you who have been to seminary:
1. Which seminary did you go to?
I didn't.

2. Would you go to that same seminary again, or a different one?
Since I didn't, no.

Why?
There are numerous seminaries available. Many online now.

I'd attend the Calvary Chapel University.


They have a great reputation for excellent hermeneutics, and excellent teachers.



3. What did you like or dislike about that seminary?
It's had a long-standing reputation as a great bible teaching school.
 

Woody50

Member
For those of you who have been to seminary:
1. Which seminary did you go to?
2. Would you go to that same seminary again, or a different one? Why?
3. What did you like or dislike about that seminary?
I didn't go, but I'd like to suggest you reach out to a former CARM member from a LONG time ago. I'm not sure if this contact info is till valid, but his name is John Stevenson. He got is Bachelors, Master's, and PhD in Theology. When I thought about going to seminary, he said, "That's great! Just remember that I went to Seminary, and had to spend the rest of my life unlearning what I learned there." Or something to that effect. He obviously values it...but with caution. It's his advice that turned me to getting my M.Ed.

I don't mean to scare you off. Here's his web page (and it's old, so the info might not be current): https://www.angelfire.com/nt/theology/js.html

Other than that, I'd say that you should just start researching and calling Seminaries. Find out their beliefs, philosophy of education, etc. Talk to them. You'll get a good idea from that alone.

Oh...and pray (obviously). He knows better than anyone.
 

SteveB

Well-known member
I didn't go, but I'd like to suggest you reach out to a former CARM member from a LONG time ago. I'm not sure if this contact info is till valid, but his name is John Stevenson. He got is Bachelors, Master's, and PhD in Theology. When I thought about going to seminary, he said, "That's great! Just remember that I went to Seminary, and had to spend the rest of my life unlearning what I learned there." Or something to that effect. He obviously values it...but with caution. It's his advice that turned me to getting my M.Ed.

I don't mean to scare you off. Here's his web page (and it's old, so the info might not be current): https://www.angelfire.com/nt/theology/js.html

Other than that, I'd say that you should just start researching and calling Seminaries. Find out their beliefs, philosophy of education, etc. Talk to them. You'll get a good idea from that alone.

Oh...and pray (obviously). He knows better than anyone.
never heard of him, and don't know who he is, but he is still teaching, and his present page is---

 

Woody50

Member
never heard of him, and don't know who he is, but he is still teaching, and his present page is---

I appreciate that. I know that page, though.

Seminary degrees for all three. He still was skeptical about them, so I appreciated his advice to me so many years ago. I'd say that the desire to go to Seminary is misguided. Get involved in a church family. Help out there. Get a job there. THEN, you can talk to that body of Christ about further learning.
 

SteveB

Well-known member
I appreciate that. I know that page, though.

Seminary degrees for all three. He still was skeptical about them, so I appreciated his advice to me so many years ago. I'd say that the desire to go to Seminary is misguided. Get involved in a church family. Help out there. Get a job there. THEN, you can talk to that body of Christ about further learning.
As a long-time attendee of the Calvary Chapel church community, they've generally downplayed seminary, but most of their pastors are college educated to some extent or another.
I know they've had their own bible school and it's now become a university.

I think it's easier to get lost in the studies because there's an aire of if I get an education in this, I'll know how to know God and it'll be easier than just reading the bible.

The problem I see is that we still have to learn to actually follow Jesus. And no scholastic education will teach us how to do that.

We will still have to work through the process and we will still need to believe and obey the word, and pay attention to the Holy Spirit in service.
 

SteveB

Well-known member
I appreciate that. I know that page, though.

Seminary degrees for all three. He still was skeptical about them, so I appreciated his advice to me so many years ago. I'd say that the desire to go to Seminary is misguided. Get involved in a church family. Help out there. Get a job there. THEN, you can talk to that body of Christ about further learning.
As a long-time attendee of the Calvary Chapel church community, they've generally downplayed seminary, but most of their pastors are college educated to some extent or another.
I know they've had their own bible school and it's now become a university.

I think it's easier to get lost in the studies because there's an aire of if I get an education in this, I'll know how to know God and it'll be easier than just reading the bible.

The problem I see is that we still have to learn to actually follow Jesus. And no scholastic education will teach us how to do that.

We will still have to work through the process and we will still need to believe and obey the word, and pay attention to the Holy Spirit in service.
 

John t

Active member
squirrelyguy said:

For those of you who have been to seminary:
1. Which seminary did you go to?
2. Would you go to that same seminary again, or a different one? Why?
3. What did you like or dislike about that seminary?

I went to Biblical Theological Seminary in Hatfield Pennsylvania, but graduated from Reformed Episcopal, then in Philadelphia. Both were Bible believing, Reformed in theology and Evangelical with strong emphasis on the languages of the Bible, Hebrew and Greek. If you plan to go to the East coast, they are two you may look up. The students there called RE, "the poor man's Westminster" (which also is nearby, just outside of Philadelphia.

One thing setting RE apart (when I went there) is that you do not need to go college first. All students must take the same courses, but those without a bachelors could earn theirs after graduation, come back to RE, and earn an accredited M. Div after doing a thesis.

The adage "God does not call the equipped; rather He equips those He called" is good to keep in mind. People should go to seminary to get equipped for the way God called them to serve. That is a giant paradigm shift in the way that we earn the letters after our names. They become instruments for services rather than milestones of achievements.

In both, I sat under world-known scholars, some as professors and some as lecturers. One was the Curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, and he really brought archeology to life!

Thus, I urge you to pray, and listen to the answer God gives you. If you are to become a pastor, that is a prerequisite, and it is good to cultivate that practice so that later on, it becomes second nature. Nor to be afraid to directly ask God to have Holy Spirit tell you what He wants for you.

In 1 John , we are told to test every spirit, so this advice is a "spiritual warfare test" . Pray over this, and do not hesitate to ask God for a confirmation of His will. Remember Gideon who asked, and was never reprimanded for asking. That has not changed.
 

Chuckz

Member
I might get in trouble if I mention names but one college had ONLY two Bible classes and the rest were secular while they advertised on secular radio stations and called themselves a Christian liberal arts college. And then one of my friends told me a story about how her friend complained about her room mate doing things with her boyfriend in her dorm and how my friend helped her friend wash her car off because it had human excrement smeared all over it. That is what could happen if you go to a worldly Christian college.

Other schools have Bible in all of their classes and do not specifically invite the world in. I remember looking at the application and you had to have a recommendation from your Church's pastor. I know people from the world who ask me how to become a pastor and they curse when I say that because they didn't walk the walk.

I think you should really back up and ask what is a healthy and balanced church and ask what is a Christian.

There are also colleges which don't really require you to be Christian in my opinion.

If you haven't read the Bible all the way through several times and if you haven't written your own essays on essential Christian doctrine, it could be hard.

The real question is, "Why are you going?" and what do you expect to put into it?

I have Christian reference books that those who went to Bible college say, "yuck" to. So why do people go if they don't want it?
 
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