Seven Days

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
I'll keep it simple to start with the ball in the court of the Bible critic. One misconception of many they have is that the Bible says the heavens and earth were created in 6 literal days (144 hours) followed by a literal day of rest, is this correct? Let's begin to explore that by asking them to explain why they think that is the case.
 

SteveB

Well-known member
I'll keep it simple to start with the ball in the court of the Bible critic. One misconception of many they have is that the Bible says the heavens and earth were created in 6 literal days (144 hours) followed by a literal day of rest, is this correct? Let's begin to explore that by asking them to explain why they think that is the case.
Easy.
The word selected by the writer is yom.

Yom means day.

Yomim is the plural of day, days.

A comprehensive study of the word yom, and yomim always gets translated as day(s).

It always refers to a single day.

Next...

The passages state-- the evening and the morning were ...... day....

It doesn't say anything about plural mornings or plural evenings. It's always a single evening and a single morning.

The words in Hebrew for morning is boker.
Evening is erev.
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
I'll keep it simple to start with the ball in the court of the Bible critic. One misconception of many they have is that the Bible says the heavens and earth were created in 6 literal days (144 hours) followed by a literal day of rest, is this correct? Let's begin to explore that by asking them to explain why they think that is the case.
Because it says that.
 

SteveB

Well-known member
I'll keep it simple to start with the ball in the court of the Bible critic. One misconception of many they have is that the Bible says the heavens and earth were created in 6 literal days (144 hours) followed by a literal day of rest, is this correct? Let's begin to explore that by asking them to explain why they think that is the case.



To further my point previously about boker, the plural of boker, which is morning, becomes mornings, is bkarim, or bokrie.

Erev, is evening.
The plural of erev is avarim or avrie

We then have the usages of the word yom, and yomim in Noah's flood. He waited 150 yomim.... days... for the flood to subside.

Male children are to be circumcised on the 8th day.... yom.

In doing a word search for the word yom, and its variations, there are 2304 instances of the word. The Hebrew strong's number is H3117.




Here's an article that delves into it further than I will.


 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
Because it says that.

It doesn't matter what it says, what does it mean? The seventh day continues to this day thousands of years later, Judgement day is a thousand years, it also says that all six days were one, which was it? 1 or 6? It says both. In the Bible yohm can mean any time from a few hours to time indefinate. That's what the English word day means. Watch, I'll show you. In those days I worked the day shift 7 days a week.
 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
Easy.
The word selected by the writer is yom.

Yom means day.

Yomim is the plural of day, days.

Okay. So? What does day mean?

A comprehensive study of the word yom, and yomim always gets translated as day(s).

:rolleyes: Am I to understand you've undertaken this comprehensive study of which you speak?

It always refers to a single day.

Genesis 2:4 - This is the history of the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that Yahweh God made the earth and the heavens.

Next...

The passages state-- the evening and the morning were ...... day....

It doesn't say anything about plural mornings or plural evenings. It's always a single evening and a single morning.

The words in Hebrew for morning is boker.
Evening is erev.

And you suppose each of those strictly adhere to a literal 24 hour period? Even given Genesis 2:4 mentioned above?
 

docphin5

Well-known member
It doesn't matter what it says, what does it mean?
Keep in mind that what it means to you may not be what it meant to those who wrote it.
The seventh day continues to this day thousands of years later, Judgement day is a thousand years, it also says that all six days were one, which was it? 1 or 6? It says both. In the Bible yohm can mean any time from a few hours to time indefinate. That's what the English word day means. Watch, I'll show you. In those days I worked the day shift 7 days a week.
Your explanations could be meaningless if the original author meant something entirely different. His symbols, metaphors, and figures may have meant something different to him than it does to the modern mind.
 

Eightcrackers

Well-known member
In the Bible yohm can mean any time from a few hours to time indefinate. That's what the English word day means. Watch, I'll show you. In those days I worked the day shift 7 days a week.
The moment you put a number in front of it, the word days ceases to be an indefinite time period.

"In those six days, I worked the day shift"

means something completely different from - and far more specific than -

"In those days, I worked the day shift".
 

CrowCross

Super Member
I'll keep it simple to start with the ball in the court of the Bible critic. One misconception of many they have is that the Bible says the heavens and earth were created in 6 literal days (144 hours) followed by a literal day of rest, is this correct? Let's begin to explore that by asking them to explain why they think that is the case.
Several reasons....SteveB mentioned "yom"...24 hours....But I'll move on from that truth and present a scientific truth.

Halos....polonium halos....They show the hot magma didn't slowly cooled over millions of years...it was pretty much instant. As we all know polonium halos are embedded in granites around the world...they would not be there uness they formed quickly. Their half life is way to quick and must have been caught in an instant. Kinda like dropping an aka-seltzer into a glass of water and freezing the bubbles....the freeze must be quick or the bubbles like the radioactive decaying isotope....go away and would never form halos.

Simple enough?
 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
Keep in mind that what it means to you may not be what it meant to those who wrote it.

But I didn't say what I mean I said what it means.

Your explanations could be meaningless if the original author meant something entirely different. His symbols, metaphors, and figures may have meant something different to him than it does to the modern mind.

I've shown modern to be exactly the same as his.
 

SteveB

Well-known member
Okay. So? What does day mean?
Day.
:rolleyes: Am I to understand you've undertaken this comprehensive study of which you speak?
Genesis 2:4 - This is the history of the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that Yahweh God made the earth and the heavens.



And you suppose each of those strictly adhere to a literal 24 hour period? Even given Genesis 2:4 mentioned above?
Yep.
I'm not the One who breathed the scriptures into existence.

So, if YHVH says that each day is the evening and the morning, that sounds like it's the evening and the morning that days a day.

But, if you actually want it to mean millions or even billions of years for a single day, then perhaps you can explain the age of a child who is to be circumcised on the 8th day. Or how old Noah and his family were after spending 150 days in the ark, for the flood.
 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
The moment you put a number in front of it, the word days ceases to be an indefinite time period.

"In those six days, I worked the day shift"

means something completely different from - and far more specific than -

"In those days, I worked the day shift".

Genesis 1:5: The question of when the first day began, according to the Bible, would depend upon the context. Since the heavens had been created at Genesis 1:1 the Earth would have been rotating on its axis an indeterminate time prior to the first creative period or "day." The Hebrew word yohm (or yom), like the English word day has various applications. In the creation account itself the word is used in three different ways; the daylight hours, the stellar day (23 hours 56 minutes and 4.09 seconds) and all six of the creation periods ("days") combined. (Genesis 1:3, 5; 2:4 - compare translations of Genesis 2:4) Like saying "in his day he worked the day shift 5 days a week."

In Genesis 1:4 Jehovah divides the light from the dark bringing about the first day as opposed to night. The progressive action indicated in the imperfect state throughout the "days" of creation suggests a gradual process, possibly from the dissipation of the surrounding band of cosmic debris apparently encircling the Earth which obscured the light in the earlier stages. (Job 38:4, 9). Just for fun; to be really specific some factors to consider are that the ancient Hebrew day began and ended on the evenings, but for practical purposes they did also refer to the morning as the beginning as we would. (Leviticus 23:32; 7:15) Further hair splitting there is the day length fluctuations but, thankfully, we don't need to go there.

Do we?
 

The Pixie

Well-known member
It doesn't matter what it says, what does it mean?
Of course it matters what it says! That is not to say what it means does not matter too, but the way I use a text is I use what it says to determine what it means.

The seventh day continues to this day thousands of years later, Judgement day is a thousand years, it also says that all six days were one, which was it? 1 or 6? It says both.
Where does it say seventh day continues to this day? That is certainly not how I read the text. Where does it say judgement day is a thousand years? And why should I imagine the author of Genesis had even heard of judgement day?

In the Bible yohm can mean any time from a few hours to time indefinate. That's what the English word day means. Watch, I'll show you. In those days I worked the day shift 7 days a week.
And it can mean a 24-hour period. Genesis 1:5 in particular seems to indicate that is how it is being used, as it also mentions evening, morning, the day/night cycle and the first day.

Can you tell me why you think it means a longer period of time in Genesis 1? My guess is because you have decided that the process took longer, and you are forcing your beliefs on the text.
 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
Day.


Yep.
I'm not the One who breathed the scriptures into existence.

No, you're the one that [expletive] it up in your comprehensive study.

So, if YHVH says that each day is the evening and the morning, that sounds like it's the evening and the morning that days a day.

That a literal 24 hour period? I figure about half. From our reckoning you still have afternoon and night, the ancient Hebrew speaking people such as Moses had a bit more to it but about the same. How much time was a watch in the night in Hebrew and Greek?

But, if you actually want it to mean millions or even billions of years for a single day, then perhaps you can explain the age of a child who is to be circumcised on the 8th day. Or how old Noah and his family were after spending 150 days in the ark, for the flood.

You think that's necessary? How long is a day to God?
 

SteveB

Well-known member
No, you're the one that [expletive] it up in your comprehensive study.
Wow. Really? If that's the case then why did you ask the question in the first place?

That a literal 24 hour period?
Yep.

From our reckoning you still have afternoon and night, the ancient Hebrew speaking people such as Moses had a bit more to it but about the same.
Oh, well, since you need to be nitpicky about it, Roman soldiers did eight three hour shifts, so I'd say you can indeed do whatever you want.
It's pretty clear that you just want what you think should be true, and to hades with the actual truth.


How much time was a watch in the night in Hebrew and Greek?
Ask them.

You think that's necessary?
Oh absolutely! You just made it clear that unless what I think agrees with you, I should expletive myself.

How long is a day to God?
Considering that he's been alive for eternity, his perspective of time is far more profound than ours. From what I read in the bible, in several trillion eons, we'll feel the same about time.
Especially when we read that there will be no more sun or moon, because the Lamb will be the light we dwell in.

Rev 22:5 WEB There will be no night, and they need no lamp light or sun light; for the Lord God will illuminate them. They will reign forever and ever.


I have a novel idea.

Instead of trying to figure out how to force fit the bible to match your ideas, why not let your ideas become transformed by the Word of God. Exactly as described in Romans 12.

Rom 12:1-3 WEB 1 Therefore I urge you, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your spiritual service. 2 Don’t be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what is the good, well-pleasing, and perfect will of God. 3 For I say through the grace that was given me, to everyone who is among you, not to think of yourself more highly than you ought to think; but to think reasonably, as God has apportioned to each person a measure of faith.

I agree that it's not easy, but it's imperative for the followers of Jesus to do this.
 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
Several reasons....SteveB mentioned "yom"...24 hours....But I'll move on from that truth and present a scientific truth.

Think that's a good move on your part?

Halos....polonium halos....They show the hot magma didn't slowly cooled over millions of years...it was pretty much instant. As we all know polonium halos are embedded in granites around the world...they would not be there uness they formed quickly. Their half life is way to quick and must have been caught in an instant. Kinda like dropping an aka-seltzer into a glass of water and freezing the bubbles....the freeze must be quick or the bubbles like the radioactive decaying isotope....go away and would never form halos.

Simple enough?

No. Not for me. How about this . . . how long does it take light to get here from Eagle Nebula? 7,000 years.
 

Semmelweis Reflex

Active member
The moment you put a number in front of it, the word days ceases to be an indefinite time period.

"In those six days, I worked the day shift"

means something completely different from - and far more specific than -

"In those days, I worked the day shift".

How does this relate to the subject?
 
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