Spirits in Prison

The Prophet

Member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



Let us get cracking with the interpretation.



I.- Context



First of all, how about a little bit of context? Peter –history’s most famous fisherman- pens his first epistle for the suffering saints in Asia Minor (an area you and I know as Turkey) in the sixties of the first century.



The letter kicks off 1) proclaiming the Gospel (1:1-12) then 2) majoring upon sanctification (1:13-2:10) and 3) submission as the hallmark of God’s chosen people (2:11-3:12). The fourth key theme of the book is persecution (3:13-4:19). And it is in this fourth section where our verses appear.



Before reaching 3:19-20, Peter is trying to help persecuted believers to overcome the dread of persecution. So in vv. 14-15 he reminds them of their blessed hope and of their need to fear the Lord more than their enemies. And in vv. 16-17 he explains the need of a having their conscience in peace with the Lord.



Then, in vv. 18-20, Peter proceeds to use two examples of suffering in days of persecution, namely, Christ and Noah. To this thorny subject we now turn.



II.- Verse 19



“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison”.



Let’s go step by step.



The first two words –“by which” or “in which”- to what are they alluding? They reference back to the subject of the final clause of the previous verse (v. 18), namely, the Holy Spirit. The whole clause reads, “Being put to death in the flesh, but quickened (or made alive) by the Spirit: by which also He went...”







1 Peter 3:19-20 is one of the most difficult passages in New Testament studies.



So the “by which” or the “in which” would be best translated as “by whom” or “in whom” given the personal nature of the Spirit of God. Jesus, according to v. 19, “went and preached” by the Spirit of God or in the Spirit of God.



So far, so good! But now the problems start. Jesus went and preached in the Spirit unto “the spirits in prison”. What is Peter talking about here? We’ll have to fast forward to verse 20.



III.- Verse 20



“Which sometime (in another time) were disobedient, when once the longsuffering (patience) of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



So, “the spirits in prison” in v. 19 were those who were “disobedient” in the days of Noah. Who was disobedient in the days of Noah? Everybody except for the eight folk that were saved in the ark! Noah preached the Word of God unto them as a good old-fashioned “preacher of righteousness” but no-one listened.



What happened to the disobedient? They were drowned in the great deluge that the Lord sent.



Peter’s first epistle is written a few thousand years after the flood. Those who disobeyed the Word of God in Noah’s day were no longer alive in the flesh. Therefore, Peter –in the first century AD- has no qualms in speaking of them as “the spirits in prison”.



The disobedient once walked the earth in their human bodies; but now, as they await the great Final Day of the resurrection of the just and the unjust, they are bound and abide under the hot wrath of the Almighty.



But how could Jesus go and preach to them if they had died thousands of years before His incarnation?



Well, Peter never says that Christ preached in the flesh. He states the Lord did so by means of the Spirit. According to 1 Peter 1:11, the Spirit of Christ announced, “beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glory that should follow”. In other words, Christ spoke through the prophets by means of His Spirit.



2 Peter 1:21 tells us the same story: “The prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Ghost”.







The natural reading of the text would be that Jesus preached to the sinners in Noah's day by means of the Spirit of God.



In each case, Peter is telling us that although Jesus had not yet come to earth in physical form, He spoke repeatedly by means of the prophets. And this is exactly what is happening in our verse (v. 20). How did Jesus speak to the disobedient men and women in the days of the ark? By means of Noah, of course! Noah was the mouthpiece of the Spirit of God.



“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3). Perhaps this text means that the Lord used Noah to preach repentance for 120 years before sending the flood. But what is crystal clear is that the Spirit of the Lord was at work in the days of Noah the prophet.



A natural way to interpret these couple of verses, then, would be that the Lord Jesus preached through Noah to the sinners before the flood came.



All this makes sense when we hop back into the immediate context of the verses. Peter is encouraging persecuted saints to be strong in the Lord. By means of the example of Noah, the people of God in Asia Minor could understand that their tough situation was by no means new. They were not the first folk on earth to suffer for preaching the Word of God.



God’s people are always a remnant. Only eight were saved in Noah’s day. And so it should come as no surprise to true Christians to realize that the vast majority of Adam’s children are going to reject the Word of the Lord.



IV.- Conclusion



Once read in its persecution-related context, 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t all that difficult to understand. There is no inkling of Christ visiting a mysterious Purgatory-like underworld. What Peter is saying is that Christ’s disciples should be bold because it forms part of the package of Christian faith to be rejected and ostracized by the world at large.



As Christ preached His Word through the mouth of Noah in Genesis, so He spoke powerfully through Peter to guide and uplift His afflicted church. And even to this very day, the Lord still desires to speak through His redeemed people so that many more sinners can come into the ark of salvation.



Maybe 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t that tough after all...



 

zerinus

Member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



Let us get cracking with the interpretation.



I.- Context



First of all, how about a little bit of context? Peter –history’s most famous fisherman- pens his first epistle for the suffering saints in Asia Minor (an area you and I know as Turkey) in the sixties of the first century.



The letter kicks off 1) proclaiming the Gospel (1:1-12) then 2) majoring upon sanctification (1:13-2:10) and 3) submission as the hallmark of God’s chosen people (2:11-3:12). The fourth key theme of the book is persecution (3:13-4:19). And it is in this fourth section where our verses appear.



Before reaching 3:19-20, Peter is trying to help persecuted believers to overcome the dread of persecution. So in vv. 14-15 he reminds them of their blessed hope and of their need to fear the Lord more than their enemies. And in vv. 16-17 he explains the need of a having their conscience in peace with the Lord.



Then, in vv. 18-20, Peter proceeds to use two examples of suffering in days of persecution, namely, Christ and Noah. To this thorny subject we now turn.



II.- Verse 19



“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison”.



Let’s go step by step.



The first two words –“by which” or “in which”- to what are they alluding? They reference back to the subject of the final clause of the previous verse (v. 18), namely, the Holy Spirit. The whole clause reads, “Being put to death in the flesh, but quickened (or made alive) by the Spirit: by which also He went...”







1 Peter 3:19-20 is one of the most difficult passages in New Testament studies.



So the “by which” or the “in which” would be best translated as “by whom” or “in whom” given the personal nature of the Spirit of God. Jesus, according to v. 19, “went and preached” by the Spirit of God or in the Spirit of God.



So far, so good! But now the problems start. Jesus went and preached in the Spirit unto “the spirits in prison”. What is Peter talking about here? We’ll have to fast forward to verse 20.



III.- Verse 20



“Which sometime (in another time) were disobedient, when once the longsuffering (patience) of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



So, “the spirits in prison” in v. 19 were those who were “disobedient” in the days of Noah. Who was disobedient in the days of Noah? Everybody except for the eight folk that were saved in the ark! Noah preached the Word of God unto them as a good old-fashioned “preacher of righteousness” but no-one listened.



What happened to the disobedient? They were drowned in the great deluge that the Lord sent.



Peter’s first epistle is written a few thousand years after the flood. Those who disobeyed the Word of God in Noah’s day were no longer alive in the flesh. Therefore, Peter –in the first century AD- has no qualms in speaking of them as “the spirits in prison”.



The disobedient once walked the earth in their human bodies; but now, as they await the great Final Day of the resurrection of the just and the unjust, they are bound and abide under the hot wrath of the Almighty.



But how could Jesus go and preach to them if they had died thousands of years before His incarnation?



Well, Peter never says that Christ preached in the flesh. He states the Lord did so by means of the Spirit. According to 1 Peter 1:11, the Spirit of Christ announced, “beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glory that should follow”. In other words, Christ spoke through the prophets by means of His Spirit.



2 Peter 1:21 tells us the same story: “The prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Ghost”.







The natural reading of the text would be that Jesus preached to the sinners in Noah's day by means of the Spirit of God.



In each case, Peter is telling us that although Jesus had not yet come to earth in physical form, He spoke repeatedly by means of the prophets. And this is exactly what is happening in our verse (v. 20). How did Jesus speak to the disobedient men and women in the days of the ark? By means of Noah, of course! Noah was the mouthpiece of the Spirit of God.



“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3). Perhaps this text means that the Lord used Noah to preach repentance for 120 years before sending the flood. But what is crystal clear is that the Spirit of the Lord was at work in the days of Noah the prophet.



A natural way to interpret these couple of verses, then, would be that the Lord Jesus preached through Noah to the sinners before the flood came.



All this makes sense when we hop back into the immediate context of the verses. Peter is encouraging persecuted saints to be strong in the Lord. By means of the example of Noah, the people of God in Asia Minor could understand that their tough situation was by no means new. They were not the first folk on earth to suffer for preaching the Word of God.



God’s people are always a remnant. Only eight were saved in Noah’s day. And so it should come as no surprise to true Christians to realize that the vast majority of Adam’s children are going to reject the Word of the Lord.



IV.- Conclusion



Once read in its persecution-related context, 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t all that difficult to understand. There is no inkling of Christ visiting a mysterious Purgatory-like underworld. What Peter is saying is that Christ’s disciples should be bold because it forms part of the package of Christian faith to be rejected and ostracized by the world at large.



As Christ preached His Word through the mouth of Noah in Genesis, so He spoke powerfully through Peter to guide and uplift His afflicted church. And even to this very day, the Lord still desires to speak through His redeemed people so that many more sinners can come into the ark of salvation.



Maybe 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t that tough after all...



What a load of convoluted nonsense. I read the first few lines, got bored, and gave up. No wonder nobody else has replied.
 

Shoonra

New member
"He preached to imprisoned spirits" is commonly used as the prooftext for the Harrowing of Hell, the doctrine (or folklore) that Jesus, presumably after being crucified, visited Hell and possibly rescued some pre-Christians and took them to Heaven.
 

Aaron32

Active member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



Let us get cracking with the interpretation.



I.- Context



First of all, how about a little bit of context? Peter –history’s most famous fisherman- pens his first epistle for the suffering saints in Asia Minor (an area you and I know as Turkey) in the sixties of the first century.



The letter kicks off 1) proclaiming the Gospel (1:1-12) then 2) majoring upon sanctification (1:13-2:10) and 3) submission as the hallmark of God’s chosen people (2:11-3:12). The fourth key theme of the book is persecution (3:13-4:19). And it is in this fourth section where our verses appear.



Before reaching 3:19-20, Peter is trying to help persecuted believers to overcome the dread of persecution. So in vv. 14-15 he reminds them of their blessed hope and of their need to fear the Lord more than their enemies. And in vv. 16-17 he explains the need of a having their conscience in peace with the Lord.



Then, in vv. 18-20, Peter proceeds to use two examples of suffering in days of persecution, namely, Christ and Noah. To this thorny subject we now turn.



II.- Verse 19



“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison”.



Let’s go step by step.



The first two words –“by which” or “in which”- to what are they alluding? They reference back to the subject of the final clause of the previous verse (v. 18), namely, the Holy Spirit. The whole clause reads, “Being put to death in the flesh, but quickened (or made alive) by the Spirit: by which also He went...”







1 Peter 3:19-20 is one of the most difficult passages in New Testament studies.



So the “by which” or the “in which” would be best translated as “by whom” or “in whom” given the personal nature of the Spirit of God. Jesus, according to v. 19, “went and preached” by the Spirit of God or in the Spirit of God.



So far, so good! But now the problems start. Jesus went and preached in the Spirit unto “the spirits in prison”. What is Peter talking about here? We’ll have to fast forward to verse 20.



III.- Verse 20



“Which sometime (in another time) were disobedient, when once the longsuffering (patience) of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



So, “the spirits in prison” in v. 19 were those who were “disobedient” in the days of Noah. Who was disobedient in the days of Noah? Everybody except for the eight folk that were saved in the ark! Noah preached the Word of God unto them as a good old-fashioned “preacher of righteousness” but no-one listened.



What happened to the disobedient? They were drowned in the great deluge that the Lord sent.



Peter’s first epistle is written a few thousand years after the flood. Those who disobeyed the Word of God in Noah’s day were no longer alive in the flesh. Therefore, Peter –in the first century AD- has no qualms in speaking of them as “the spirits in prison”.



The disobedient once walked the earth in their human bodies; but now, as they await the great Final Day of the resurrection of the just and the unjust, they are bound and abide under the hot wrath of the Almighty.



But how could Jesus go and preach to them if they had died thousands of years before His incarnation?



Well, Peter never says that Christ preached in the flesh. He states the Lord did so by means of the Spirit. According to 1 Peter 1:11, the Spirit of Christ announced, “beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glory that should follow”. In other words, Christ spoke through the prophets by means of His Spirit.



2 Peter 1:21 tells us the same story: “The prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Ghost”.







The natural reading of the text would be that Jesus preached to the sinners in Noah's day by means of the Spirit of God.



In each case, Peter is telling us that although Jesus had not yet come to earth in physical form, He spoke repeatedly by means of the prophets. And this is exactly what is happening in our verse (v. 20). How did Jesus speak to the disobedient men and women in the days of the ark? By means of Noah, of course! Noah was the mouthpiece of the Spirit of God.



“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3). Perhaps this text means that the Lord used Noah to preach repentance for 120 years before sending the flood. But what is crystal clear is that the Spirit of the Lord was at work in the days of Noah the prophet.



A natural way to interpret these couple of verses, then, would be that the Lord Jesus preached through Noah to the sinners before the flood came.



All this makes sense when we hop back into the immediate context of the verses. Peter is encouraging persecuted saints to be strong in the Lord. By means of the example of Noah, the people of God in Asia Minor could understand that their tough situation was by no means new. They were not the first folk on earth to suffer for preaching the Word of God.



God’s people are always a remnant. Only eight were saved in Noah’s day. And so it should come as no surprise to true Christians to realize that the vast majority of Adam’s children are going to reject the Word of the Lord.



IV.- Conclusion



Once read in its persecution-related context, 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t all that difficult to understand. There is no inkling of Christ visiting a mysterious Purgatory-like underworld. What Peter is saying is that Christ’s disciples should be bold because it forms part of the package of Christian faith to be rejected and ostracized by the world at large.



As Christ preached His Word through the mouth of Noah in Genesis, so He spoke powerfully through Peter to guide and uplift His afflicted church. And even to this very day, the Lord still desires to speak through His redeemed people so that many more sinners can come into the ark of salvation.



Maybe 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t that tough after all...



So far, so good (IMO) take us the rest of the distance down to 1 Peter 4:6.
For what cause is the gospel preached to the dead?
 

Aaron32

Active member
Not referring to physical dead but spiritual dead
“6 For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.”

Who is “they” referring to? The dead?
 

The Prophet

Member
“6 For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.”

Who is “they” referring to? The dead?
A non-believer is dead in his sins
 

Aaron32

Active member
I said you preach to the Non believer
Ok. Let’s switch out “they” for “ the Non believer” and let’s see how that looks:

1 Peter 4:6 For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are [the Non believers], that [the Non believers] might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.

So, your claiming the Non-believers live according to God in the Spirit?
 

e v e

Active member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



Let us get cracking with the interpretation.



I.- Context



First of all, how about a little bit of context? Peter –history’s most famous fisherman- pens his first epistle for the suffering saints in Asia Minor (an area you and I know as Turkey) in the sixties of the first century.



The letter kicks off 1) proclaiming the Gospel (1:1-12) then 2) majoring upon sanctification (1:13-2:10) and 3) submission as the hallmark of God’s chosen people (2:11-3:12). The fourth key theme of the book is persecution (3:13-4:19). And it is in this fourth section where our verses appear.



Before reaching 3:19-20, Peter is trying to help persecuted believers to overcome the dread of persecution. So in vv. 14-15 he reminds them of their blessed hope and of their need to fear the Lord more than their enemies. And in vv. 16-17 he explains the need of a having their conscience in peace with the Lord.



Then, in vv. 18-20, Peter proceeds to use two examples of suffering in days of persecution, namely, Christ and Noah. To this thorny subject we now turn.



II.- Verse 19



“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison”.



Let’s go step by step.



The first two words –“by which” or “in which”- to what are they alluding? They reference back to the subject of the final clause of the previous verse (v. 18), namely, the Holy Spirit. The whole clause reads, “Being put to death in the flesh, but quickened (or made alive) by the Spirit: by which also He went...”







1 Peter 3:19-20 is one of the most difficult passages in New Testament studies.



So the “by which” or the “in which” would be best translated as “by whom” or “in whom” given the personal nature of the Spirit of God. Jesus, according to v. 19, “went and preached” by the Spirit of God or in the Spirit of God.



So far, so good! But now the problems start. Jesus went and preached in the Spirit unto “the spirits in prison”. What is Peter talking about here? We’ll have to fast forward to verse 20.



III.- Verse 20



“Which sometime (in another time) were disobedient, when once the longsuffering (patience) of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.



So, “the spirits in prison” in v. 19 were those who were “disobedient” in the days of Noah. Who was disobedient in the days of Noah? Everybody except for the eight folk that were saved in the ark! Noah preached the Word of God unto them as a good old-fashioned “preacher of righteousness” but no-one listened.



What happened to the disobedient? They were drowned in the great deluge that the Lord sent.



Peter’s first epistle is written a few thousand years after the flood. Those who disobeyed the Word of God in Noah’s day were no longer alive in the flesh. Therefore, Peter –in the first century AD- has no qualms in speaking of them as “the spirits in prison”.



The disobedient once walked the earth in their human bodies; but now, as they await the great Final Day of the resurrection of the just and the unjust, they are bound and abide under the hot wrath of the Almighty.



But how could Jesus go and preach to them if they had died thousands of years before His incarnation?



Well, Peter never says that Christ preached in the flesh. He states the Lord did so by means of the Spirit. According to 1 Peter 1:11, the Spirit of Christ announced, “beforehand the sufferings of Christ and the glory that should follow”. In other words, Christ spoke through the prophets by means of His Spirit.



2 Peter 1:21 tells us the same story: “The prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Ghost”.







The natural reading of the text would be that Jesus preached to the sinners in Noah's day by means of the Spirit of God.



In each case, Peter is telling us that although Jesus had not yet come to earth in physical form, He spoke repeatedly by means of the prophets. And this is exactly what is happening in our verse (v. 20). How did Jesus speak to the disobedient men and women in the days of the ark? By means of Noah, of course! Noah was the mouthpiece of the Spirit of God.



“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3). Perhaps this text means that the Lord used Noah to preach repentance for 120 years before sending the flood. But what is crystal clear is that the Spirit of the Lord was at work in the days of Noah the prophet.



A natural way to interpret these couple of verses, then, would be that the Lord Jesus preached through Noah to the sinners before the flood came.



All this makes sense when we hop back into the immediate context of the verses. Peter is encouraging persecuted saints to be strong in the Lord. By means of the example of Noah, the people of God in Asia Minor could understand that their tough situation was by no means new. They were not the first folk on earth to suffer for preaching the Word of God.



God’s people are always a remnant. Only eight were saved in Noah’s day. And so it should come as no surprise to true Christians to realize that the vast majority of Adam’s children are going to reject the Word of the Lord.



IV.- Conclusion



Once read in its persecution-related context, 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t all that difficult to understand. There is no inkling of Christ visiting a mysterious Purgatory-like underworld. What Peter is saying is that Christ’s disciples should be bold because it forms part of the package of Christian faith to be rejected and ostracized by the world at large.



As Christ preached His Word through the mouth of Noah in Genesis, so He spoke powerfully through Peter to guide and uplift His afflicted church. And even to this very day, the Lord still desires to speak through His redeemed people so that many more sinners can come into the ark of salvation.



Maybe 1 Peter 3:19-20 isn’t that tough after all...



you could post that in apologetics. It’s not mormon related and I could reply.
 

Gary Mac

Member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.

It is easy, the prison he preached to are those sitting in a pew week after week having a form of godliness but have no idea what it is to be like the Father of Heaven and in His same image, which simply is Love. Love will drive one from those pews and hit the streets, prisons' giving up the right to self to help another in need. ,
 

Slyzr

Member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.
/

“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3). Perhaps this text means that the Lord used Noah to preach repentance for 120 years before sending the flood. But what is crystal clear is that the Spirit of the Lord was at work in the days of Noah the prophet.
/


“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3).


Context is key on this one.

Why the demotion?

sr
 

GeneZ

Member
One of the toughest New Testament texts to interpret is 1 Peter 3:19-20.

What does it say?

It reads:

“By which (or in which) also He went and preached unto the spirits in prison; which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water”.


Those "spirits" speaks of the offspring that took place when angels and human women procreated just before the flood. God could not give those hybrid bodies souls like men are.
 

Base12

Member
From Wikipedia...

Modern Christian interpretations
Wayne Grudem (1988) identifies five commonly held views on the interpretation of this verse:
  • "View 1: When Noah was building the ark, Christ 'in spirit' was in Noah preaching repentance and righteousness through him to unbelievers who were on the earth then but are now 'spirits in prison' (people in Hell)."
  • "View 2: After Christ died, he went and preached to people in Hell, offering them a second chance of salvation."
  • "View 3: After Christ died, he went and preached to people in Hell, proclaiming to them that he had triumphed over them and their condemnation was final."
  • "View 4: After Christ died, he proclaimed release to people who had repented just before they died in the flood, and led them out of their imprisonment (in Purgatory) into Heaven."
  • "View 5: After Christ died (or: after he rose but before he ascended into Heaven), he travelled to Hell and proclaimed triumph over the fallen angels who had sinned by marrying human women before the flood."
These views revolve around the identity of the spirits in prison, the time in which the preaching took place, and the content of the preaching.
 

Gary Mac

Member
“And the Lord said: My Spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be 120 years” (Genesis 6:3).


Context is key on this one.

Why the demotion?

sr
Because man in his own beliefs of a god they have formed laws to regulate their beliefs for Him be in their image has made Him what they would have Him be. These are called denominations.

The Spirit of God has no room in these houses for enterprise. How many of these do you know who actually have the Spirit of God as their own disposition and is perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect as He commands of us? How many walk as He walks in His same light with the same signs following? How many are holy pure and without sin as He comes and takes away the sins of this world?

These have a form of godliness by their laws to govern their beliefs but hasnt a clue what it is to receive Gods Spirit as Jesus did in Matt 3:16 where all of heaven would be opened to them as well as He did in Jesus?

That is why His Spirit is not always with men because they flat our reject Him to be like Him and creed to a denomination instead.
 

Gary Mac

Member
From Wikipedia...

Modern Christian interpretations
Wayne Grudem (1988) identifies five commonly held views on the interpretation of this verse:
  • "View 1: When Noah was building the ark, Christ 'in spirit' was in Noah preaching repentance and righteousness through him to unbelievers who were on the earth then but are now 'spirits in prison' (people in Hell)."
  • "View 2: After Christ died, he went and preached to people in Hell, offering them a second chance of salvation."
  • "View 3: After Christ died, he went and preached to people in Hell, proclaiming to them that he had triumphed over them and their condemnation was final."
  • "View 4: After Christ died, he proclaimed release to people who had repented just before they died in the flood, and led them out of their imprisonment (in Purgatory) into Heaven."
  • "View 5: After Christ died (or: after he rose but before he ascended into Heaven), he travelled to Hell and proclaimed triumph over the fallen angels who had sinned by marrying human women before the flood."
These views revolve around the identity of the spirits in prison, the time in which the preaching took place, and the content of the preaching.
Give me your definition of the Christ.
 

GeneZ

Member
So far, so good (IMO) take us the rest of the distance down to 1 Peter 4:6.
For what cause is the gospel preached to the dead?


To the spirits in prison. Men are not spirits. Angels are spirits. Angels fornicated with human women in Genesis 6. A hybrid creature was produced as a result. Giants were in the land. Consisting of hybrid bodies and spirits instead of souls as what would have been found if they were men.

Sine their biological father was an angel? God sovereignly chose to make those bodies in the image of angels. That is? Not body and soul. But, body and spirit.

120 years of Noah's preaching was given.

Those spirits refused to repent and turn to God after hearing Noah's preaching.

In the mean while.

The best insight I ever heard into what took place was that Satan observed that certain angels saw that the women were beautiful and tempted them with a proposition. That if they took these women sexually (which they had been resisting, but wanted to do).That the promised seed of the woman promised in Genesis 3:15 could not take place! For the hybrid genes would not allow for the messiah to be born as a true man. And, keep in mind. Lucifer before the fall of angels was deeply loved by the angels. So much so, that one third of them preferred Lucifer over the Lord!

Long story short. The angels who wanted to sin bought the idea with hopes that their friends (Lucifer and his angels) would be restored back into the family of angels since no Messiah could be born to crush the head of Satan. Yep... those sinning angels were the equivalent of turn coat politicians who turn against their own party when they claimed to be loyal to the party.

Now...as we know. This plan of Satan failed to stop the seed of the Messiah from being born as a man.

In the mean while. While all these spirits of the offspring born of the angels and women were locked up. They kept encouraging each other. They idolized Lucifer and thought that the genius of Satan would deliver them.

Well? Jesus did make it to the Cross! He did die as a man, for all men! He went below to announce that Satan's brilliant plan had failed. In doing so, the Lord removed their false confidence and encouragement in thinking Satan was superior to the Lord.

grace and peace......
 
Top