Surviving Jaredite Names in Mesoamerica

John t

Super Member
Linda Schele was an American Mesoamerican archaeologist who was an expert in the field of Maya epigraphy and iconography. She played an invaluable role in the decipherment of much of the Maya hieroglyphs.

I am SURE that is all that.

However, that does substantiate your thesis about a fictitious people group having a "language that has "sounds" such as are in the Mayan language.

Don't you guys grow tired of posting such balderdash that is so preposterous that a first grader is not fooled? I could come up with a more apt analogy; however it would be against the rules here to do so.
 

brotherofJared

Well-known member
But Jesus talked about Moses.
That's not historical evidence. Jesus also talked about Lazarus and the rich man, but neither one of them nor the events which he described ever took place, historically. Jesus also talked about 3 people who were each given different talents and the one who was given only one talent buried it and so the master who gave him the talent buried him. That never actually happened either. He also told a story of the owner of a vineyard sent his son to check on the vineyard and the keepers of the vineyard killed him, thinking if they got rid of the heir, the vineyard would be theirs. That didn't actually happen either.

Jesus' job wasn't to correct history.
I believe Jesus. Don't you?
Sure, It doesn't change the fact that there is no historical evidence that Moses ever existed.
But while there is no archeological evidence for EVERYONE mentioned in the Bible, there is SOME evidence for SOME people mentioned in the Bible.
There is SOME evidence of SOME people mentioned in the Book of Mormon. In fact, the central figure of the Book of Mormon is a historical figure. There is evidence that his mother was Mary and that He lived in Israel and taught there. Was killed on a cross and was resurrected and there is evidence that a being like Jesus appeared to the people in the American continent around 2000 years ago. That's enough for me. ;)

Sadly, nothing will be enough for you all. As I said, how many times does an accidentally correct "guess" have to be correct before one understands that it's no accident.

The point being made, the moral of the story for those who aren't able to get it, is that historical fact is not the basis of faith. And I might add that faith is also not based on everyone else agreeing with the belief.
 

brotherofJared

Well-known member
Two reasons, mainly:

1) I know how to do a "Google" search;

2) The poster eventually came clean and gave the CITATION for his plagiarism.

(That's kind of the giveaway, don't you think?)
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
I think it's funny that rather than address the points being made, you all made it about plagiarism. The points are still valid. But misdirection is a tactic used by our critics mostly because they aren't able to address the issues.
 

brotherofJared

Well-known member
We’ve talked quite a bit about chiasmus here in the past. It can be found just about everywhere, even in ancient Chinese writings.
that's so weak. What are the chances that Joseph Smith could form a Chiasmus, long and complex ones, by looking at a stone in a hat? Well, we don't know, do we? But I suspect that it wasn't very likely.
 

Theo1689

Well-known member
I think it's funny that rather than address the points being made, you all made it about plagiarism. The points are still valid. But misdirection is a tactic used by our critics mostly because they aren't able to address the issues.

So you think it's "Funny" because a Mormon got caught plagiarizing, since (1) it is academic dishonesty EVERYWHERE, and (2) it is an EXPLICIT transgression of CARM rules?

Thank you for demonstrating so clearly that Mormons don't care about authority, and they think they are above the rules.
 

Magdalena

Well-known member
that's so weak. What are the chances that Joseph Smith could form a Chiasmus, long and complex ones, by looking at a stone in a hat? Well, we don't know, do we? But I suspect that it wasn't very likely.
Not weak at all. How did he copy large portions of the King James Bible word for word by looking at a rock in his hat? Where did the word “adieu” come from.

Smith learned to read by using the Bible. He was not stupid. But he was a con artist.
 
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Magdalena

Well-known member
Adieu is a French word meaning "goodbye" that is commonly used in English.

lehitraot
"Goodbye for now, see you again soon" (JPS) "see you later."

Yes, I know. That was my point. It’s not a Hebrew word. It’s not something ancient Hebrews could have used. So why did Smith put it in the Book of Mormon, if it was supposed to be from ancient records? Clue: it wasn’t. He made it up.
 

Mesenja

Active member
Alma 43:19 And when the armies of the Lamanites saw that the people of Nephi, or that Moroni, had prepared his people with breastplates and with arm-shields, yea, and also shields to defend their heads, and also they were dressed with thick clothing.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
I am SURE that is all that.

However, that does substantiate your thesis about a fictitious people group having a "language that has "sounds" such as are in the Mayan language.

Don't you guys grow tired of posting such balderdash that is so preposterous that a first grader is not fooled? I could come up with a more apt analogy; however it would be against the rules here to do so.
That glyph in Mayan language is no proof of the BoM. Only those closing their eyes to the truth of that can fail to see that.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
Snip

This is ridiculous. The "armor" in this Mayan picture is no proof of the BoM peoples and cities existed. Honestly, talk about desperation!
 

John t

Super Member
"Mayan “arm shield”, from Stela 17, Dos Pilas, Tetexbatun, Guatemala, Around A.D. 733"; from William J. Hamblin, “Armor in the Book of Mormon", p. 415; in Warfare in the Book of Mormon, edited by Stephen D. Ricks & William J. Hamblin, (Provo, Utah: Deseret Book Co. and FARMS, 1990). Note that this image post-dates the Nephite period.

Would the poster be so foolish as to trust a medical professional who practiced using this sort of "logic"?

Of course not! Doesn't everyone not see that the "arm" is an ADDITION to the glyph? The poster is preposterously claiming that the amorphous "arm" is NOT part of the original drawing?

Dude if you do not want to be humiliated by the responses you get from other posters, stop posting crap like that!

But hey, if you want to continue humiliating yourself, none of us will try to stop you. :rolleyes:
 
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Magdalena

Well-known member
Linda Schele was an American Mesoamerican archaeologist who was an expert in the field of Maya epigraphy and iconography. She played an invaluable role in the decipherment of much of the Maya hieroglyphs.
She was a Mormon, wasn’t she? I know she was an art teacher, with no formal training in Mayan archeology or languages.
 

Mesenja

Active member
Alma 49:4

4 But behold, how great was their disappointment; for behold, the Nephites had dug up a aridge of earth round about them, which was so high that the Lamanites could not cast their stones and their arrows at them that they might take effect, neither could they come upon them save it was by their place of entrance.



THROWING ARROWS?
By Mark F. Cheney

The ancient Americans (Aztecs, Maya, etc.) used a 'thrower' or an 'atlatl' to throw spears, darts and arrows, and possibly even stones.*
 
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