Surviving Jaredite Names in Mesoamerica

Mesenja

Well-known member
Wikipedia

Linda Schele (October 30, 1942 – April 18, 1998) was an American Mesoamerican archaeologist who was an expert in the field of Maya epigraphy and iconography. She played an invaluable role in the decipherment of much of the Maya hieroglyphs. She produced a massive volume of drawings of stelae and inscriptions, which, following her wishes, are free for use to scholars. In 1978, she founded the annual Maya Meetings at The University of Texas at Austin.


Her doctoral dissertation, "Maya Glyphs: the Verbs" was published in 1982 and won "The Most Creative and Innovative Project in Professional and Scholarly Publication" an award given by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers. The Blood of Kings was awarded the Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award of the College Art Association for the best exhibition catalogue of 1986. She was awarded diplomas of recognition of the Museo Popol Vuh and the Universidad Francisco Marroquin by the government of Guatemala in March 1998.
 
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Magdalena

Well-known member
Wikipedia

Linda Schele (October 30, 1942 – April 18, 1998) was an American Mesoamerican archaeologist who was an expert in the field of Maya epigraphy and iconography. She played an invaluable role in the decipherment of much of the Maya hieroglyphs. She produced a massive volume of drawings of stelae and inscriptions, which, following her wishes, are free for use to scholars. In 1978, she founded the annual Maya Meetings at The University of Texas at Austin.


Her doctoral dissertation, "Maya Glyphs: the Verbs" was published in 1982 and won "The Most Creative and Innovative Project in Professional and Scholarly Publication" an award given by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers. The Blood of Kings was awarded the Alfred H. Barr Jr. Award of the College Art Association for the best exhibition catalogue of 1986. She was awarded diplomas of recognition of the Museo Popol Vuh and the Universidad Francisco Marroquin by the government of Guatemala in March 1998.
Ok. She was already a trained artist and art teacher. Then she went on vacation to Mexico and got interested in Mayan archeology. She said she read everything she could get her hands on, and worked with archeologists there. Then did a doctoral dissertation. She was mostly self taught, because her other degrees didn’t have anything to do with Mayan culture.
 

Mesenja

Well-known member
While touring Palenque,Schele met the famed artist and photographer of Maya ruins,Merle Green Robertson,who became Schele’s most important mentor during the early stages of her new vocation. The association with Robertson quickly drew Schele into the world of the ancient Maya,their art and their system of hieroglyphic writing. In 1973,Robertson organized the first Mesa Redonda de Palenque,a small conference whose goal was deciphering Maya writing,a hieroglyphic system,at that time not fully understood. Participating in that conference,and working with Peter Matthews,Schele used her knowledge,vision and a compilation of recent epigraphic breakthroughs to decipher a major section of the Palenque king list. This achievement became the stimulus that led to many later discoveries by Schele and other scholars.


In 1975-76,Schele was a fellow in pre-Columbian studies at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington,D.C. During this time frame,Schele,working in conjunction with other scholars,further accelerated the process of Maya hieroglyphic decipherment through major studies of the word order in Maya inscriptions. In 1980,Schele was awarded a Ph.D. in Latin American Studies,and her dissertation,Maya Glyphs: the Verbs,published in 1982, won “The Most Creative and Innovative Project in Professional and Scholarly Publication,” an award given by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers.





 
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Bonnie

Super Member
Would the poster be so foolish as to trust a medical professional who practiced using this sort of "logic"?

Of course not! Doesn't everyone not see that the "arm" is an ADDITION to the glyph? The poster is preposterously claiming that the amorphous "arm" is NOT part of the original drawing?

Dude if you do not want to be humiliated by the responses you get from other posters, stop posting crap like that!

But hey, if you want to continue humiliating yourself, none of us will try to stop you. :rolleyes:
That armor certainly doesn't look much like the stuff ancient Middle Eastern warriors wore...breastplates would be pretty ubiquitous among various cultures all over the world. So breastplates in the Mayan picture proves nothing. Honestly, just more desperation on the part of Mormons, to convince themselves the BoM is true. Sad, really. Reminds me of that Mormon 2 boards ago who tried to convince us the LIDAR images of Central America somehow "proved" the BoM narrative was true. It was really pathetic. Remember that, John? But here is a link to FAMSI to a page showing a warrior:

http://research.famsi.org/uploads/schele/hires/01/IMG0019.jpg.

Notice the resemblance of the warrior on the right to pictures of warriors from the ancient Middle East....:rolleyes:

As for "It came ro pass" that appears just to be the choice of words the translators used to translate a glyph:

www.famsi.org › reports
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File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat
Sep 10, 2002 ... expression "u-ti" equivalent to "then it happens" or "it came to pass". These expressions of time serve to open the statements in the steps and to ...

Drat, the link is not working correctly. The sentence above was in the search engine on the famsi search engine page..It is found in a pdf file labeled "01098FahsenInterim.pdf". I tried cutting and pasting something from the file when I opened it up, but it would not allow me to.

But "then it happens" or "now it happens/happened" is just as valid a translation as "and it came to pass." So these glyphs prove absolutely nothing about Jaredites in the New World.
 
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brotherofJared

Well-known member
Not weak at all. How did he copy large portions of the King James Bible word for word by looking at a rock in his hat?
Yea. Exactly. 🙄 Nice dodge. So, do u have an answer or r u going to continue tap dancing and acting as if u made a valid point?

Smith learned to read by using the Bible. He was not stupid. But he was a con artist.
Hmmm. Ur opinion is noted. Now about those chiasmus...
 

Bonnie

Super Member
It is evidence and according to some people on this board, evidence is proof. So, it is proof of the Book of Mormon. 😉
No, it isn't at all evidence. I just showed from the archaeologist that the phrase can be translated as "now it happened/happens"--not just "and it came to pass."

Also, the Mayan Indians are of Mongolian race descent. People from the middle east, like Jews and Arabs, are Caucasians.

that phrase is found in the Bible and that is where Smith got it from. He used it and overused it in the BoM--I think I once counted it 5 times in 2 paragraphs.
 

Mesenja

Well-known member

This Used To Count As Home Teaching

Some of Joseph Smith’s (Lesser Known) Big, Beautiful Bullseyes​

August 19, 2018

(excerpt)


An Ancient American City Named Bountiful

Now jumping into the Book of Mormon. It’s about some ancient Israelites that fled from Jerusalem. In the old world,before they boarded any boats,they found an Oasis in the desert and called it Bountiful. Then they built,boarded and sailed in ships. When they landed on the American continent,eventually they found another sweet spot and called it Bountiful as well. Lehi’s descendants used the name Bountiful twice. (1st Nephi 17:5 & Alma 22:29) If it ain't broke - am I right?
Now fast forward to Mayan times. Pre-Columbian Mayan times:

“Here is one of the most important surviving works of pre-Columbian civilization,Rabinal Achi,a Mayan drama set a century before the arrival of the Spanish,produced by the translator of the best selling Popol Vuh. The first direct translation into English from Quiche Maya, based on the original text, Rabinal Achi is the story of city-states,war,and nobility….”

(https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/542161.Rabinal_Achi)

And here is an excerpt from the book form of Rabinal Achi. It’s a map with depicted Mayan cities:

EDITED BY MODERATOR--IMAGE VIOLATION. ONLY SUPER MEMBERS CAN POST IMAGES.

That doesn’t mean it is the Bountiful,of course. That is not the argument here at all. It just means Bountiful was definitely used as a city name in ancient America. Of all the possible city names that could have been used – Joseph Smith 'chose' Bountiful as the one to slip into that verse taking place in that time.
 
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Mesenja

Well-known member
“Some of the passages in the Book of Mormon do not read as good English, (however many have been changed in later editions of the Book of Mormon to make the English read better) but they are accepted usage for Hebrew. One of these is on page 351 in the first edition.

“"and he went forth among the people, waving the rent of his garment" When the word "rent" is used as a noun in English it refers to the hole in the garment caused by rending… not the portion of rent cloth. This has contributed to the fact that in subsequent editions of the Book of Mormon it is changed to read "rent part" (Alma 46:19) But the Hebrew would, in this instance,use but one word, qera, 'rent (part),'coming from qara,'he rent,tore,' for nouns,in Hebrew, are derived from roots -- as are Hebrew verbs -- by the addition of certain vowel patterns that distinguish them from other parts of speech.”

(http://www.lightplanet.com/response/idioms.htm)
 
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RiJoRi

Well-known member
"nouns,in Hebrew, are derived from roots -- as are Hebrew verbs -- by the addition of certain vowel patterns that distinguish them from other parts of speech.”

I worked with a guy from Israel, making an alarm display using Hebrew. A large problem was in trying to abbreviate Hebrew words because they dn't hv vwls!
So, I'm wondering how they managed to get "vowel patterns."
 

RiJoRi

Well-known member
When I am able to reinstall Britannica, I will look.

Meanwhile do a web search on "Hebrew Vowels"
I did. The markings were introduced in "the last half of the first century" by the Masoretes. Rather a long time after the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar.
 

Bonnie

Super Member
"nouns,in Hebrew, are derived from roots -- as are Hebrew verbs -- by the addition of certain vowel patterns that distinguish them from other parts of speech.”

I worked with a guy from Israel, making an alarm display using Hebrew. A large problem was in trying to abbreviate Hebrew words because they dn't hv vwls!
So, I'm wondering how they managed to get "vowel patterns."
Another problem is that the verb form of "rent" is "rend", to tear, often violently, and comes from Old Friesian "renda", according to my English dictionary. Not from Hebrew. And it says that "rent" is a variation of "rend."

So I do not see how this "rent" thing in post no. 78 somehow is evidence for the BoM. Plus, Smith could very easily have copied writing patterns from the Bible, mimicking it.

Again, no evidence whatsoever that the BoM is true.
 
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