Symbolic?

dberrie2020

Well-known member
Magdalena said:
But you think the white robes being washed in Christ’s blood are not symbolic.

I have an observation here.

Of course the white robes are symbolic. That does not mean they aren't real, physical white robes, or the saints wearing them are imaginary. Some here seem to believe whenever something is symbolic--it annuls the fact it's real. I wear a ring on my finger which is symbolic of the covenants I made with my wife in marriage. It's a real, physical object. It stands for something important to me. The temple itself is symbolic. Most everything the LDS do in the temples is symbolic. We partake of the sacrament on Sunday--which is symbolic. Much of physical life is symbolic of something, IMO.

Relegating something to symbolic won't make it go away, during the time it's symbolic. That's a false belief, and an ineffective approach.

What else do you have?
 

brotherofJared

Well-known member
Not to mention, the robes are real, people are wearing them. There's not much symbolism in this statement "These in white robes", he asked "who are they and where have they come from?" He observed something that was real to him so there can be little doubt that they were, in fact, people wearing white robes..

The statement that has great symbolic significance is the angel's answer, "These are the ones who have come out of great tribulation; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the lamb..." It is doubtful that anyone can wash anything in blood and make it white. This is something I've related many times, that symbolism can be seen when the verbiage isn't possible. Lamb's blood doesn't make robes white. It never will. Obviously, the blood of the Lamb is symbolic of Christ's atonement, his sacrifice for sin, being white means pure and cleansed from sin, and washing indicates baptism. So, these are they who choose to take Christ's name upon them through baptism - Note - They made them white" by their choice.

It should be obvious to the casual observer that the people and the white robes are real and not only symbolic. The angel's answer symbolically asserts that they are worthy and made clean through repentance and receiving Christ.
 

Magdalena

Well-known member
Not to mention, the robes are real, people are wearing them. There's not much symbolism in this statement "These in white robes", he asked "who are they and where have they come from?" He observed something that was real to him so there can be little doubt that they were, in fact, people wearing white robes..

The statement that has great symbolic significance is the angel's answer, "These are the ones who have come out of great tribulation; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the lamb..." It is doubtful that anyone can wash anything in blood and make it white. This is something I've related many times, that symbolism can be seen when the verbiage isn't possible. Lamb's blood doesn't make robes white. It never will. Obviously, the blood of the Lamb is symbolic of Christ's atonement, his sacrifice for sin, being way tribulation. white means pure and cleansed from sin, and washing indicates baptism. So, these are they who choose to take Christ's name upon them through baptism - Note - They made them white" by their choice.

It should be obvious to the casual observer that the people and the white robes are real and not only symbolic. The angel's answer symbolically asserts that they are worthy and made clean through repentance and receiving Christ.
After the great tribulation.
 

Aaron32

Well-known member
I have an observation here.

Of course the white robes are symbolic. That does not mean they aren't real, physical white robes, or the saints wearing them are imaginary. Some here seem to believe whenever something is symbolic--it annuls the fact it's real. I wear a ring on my finger which is symbolic of the covenants I made with my wife in marriage. It's a real, physical object. It stands for something important to me. The temple itself is symbolic. Most everything the LDS do in the temples is symbolic. We partake of the sacrament on Sunday--which is symbolic. Much of physical life is symbolic of something, IMO.

Relegating something to symbolic won't make it go away, during the time it's symbolic. That's a false belief, and an ineffective approach.

What else do you have?
Personally, I hope we wear more than just white robes for eternity. I like purity and all, but I think only white for eternity would get rather depressing.
 

brotherofJared

Well-known member
Personally, I hope we wear more than just white robes for eternity. I like purity and all, but I think only white for eternity would get rather depressing.
LOL. I'm sure you can wear whatever you want. After all, there will be black, yellow and red - as well as white people in heaven so I'm sure there will be a choice of colors in the clothing we wear as well. However, I'm sure that when you officiate in temple ordinances for those who have yet to live the celestial law, you'll be wearing white.
 

Magdalena

Well-known member
LOL. I'm sure you can wear whatever you want. After all, there will be black, yellow and red - as well as white people in heaven so I'm sure there will be a choice of colors in the clothing we wear as well. However, I'm sure that when you officiate in temple ordinances for those who have yet to live the celestial law, you'll be wearing white.
What makes you think there will be different skin colors? Is that Mormon doctrine? Or just your own.
 

dberrie2020

Well-known member
Not to mention, the robes are real, people are wearing them. There's not much symbolism in this statement "These in white robes", he asked "who are they and where have they come from?" He observed something that was real to him so there can be little doubt that they were, in fact, people wearing white robes..

I agree--but that leaves those who haven't a temple, nor anyone dressed in white--in the corner. That sets up the denial statements, and the "symbolic" accusations.

It patterns the LDS temple, and that connection has to be erased.

Yet--the LDS temple remains, and still patterns the temple description found in Revelation7:14-15.
 

dberrie2020

Well-known member
I agree--but that leaves those who haven't a temple, nor anyone dressed in white--in the corner. That sets up the denial statements, and the "symbolic" accusations.

It patterns the LDS temple, and that connection has to be erased.

Yet--the LDS temple remains, and still patterns the temple description found in Revelation7:14-15.

Anyone care to engage this?
 
Top